12

I have, what I think is, a very simple and basic setup for locally running a Spring Boot webapp with some authentication.

I would expect that when I run this application through Spring Boot, that my custom security settings would override the default behavior when I specify the local profile.

mvn -Dspring.profiles.active="local" spring-boot:run

Maybe I'm specifying the profiles.active wrong, but when the app runs, it still spits out a generated password to use, and doesn't seem to allow any access to the /login path without said authentication.

I'm also not seeing the active profiles under /env either, which may be a little telling.

I have a WebSecurityConfigurer overridden like so:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
@Profile("local")
@Order(SecurityProperties.ACCESS_OVERRIDE_ORDER)
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.authorizeRequests().anyRequest().fullyAuthenticated().and().formLogin().permitAll();
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
        auth.inMemoryAuthentication().withUser("admin").password("admin").roles("ADMIN", "USER")
        .and().withUser("user").password("user").roles("USER");

    }
}

My main @Configuration class is your standard Spring Java-style base config:

@Configuration
@ComponentScan
@EnableAutoConfiguration
public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(Application.class, args);
    }
}

3 Answers 3

21

I think I ran into the same issue. I wanted to use Spring profiles to select between none, basic, form, etc. auth. However, if I put the @Profile, @Configuration, and @EnableWebMvcSecurity on the public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter class, like they show in the examples, basic auth was active at times when I wanted no auth. (This is with @SpringBootApplication on my Application class.

I achieved what I wanted with making beans out of WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter, instead of @Configurations (code snippet is in Groovy):

@Configuration
@EnableWebMvcSecurity
class SecurityConfig {
    @Bean
    @Profile('no-auth')
    WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter noAuth() {
        new WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter() {
            @Override
            void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
                http.authorizeRequests().anyRequest().permitAll()
            }
        }
    }

    @Bean
    @Profile('default')
    WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter basic() {
        new WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter() {
            @Override
            void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
                http
                    .authorizeRequests()
                        .antMatchers('/').permitAll()
                        .anyRequest().authenticated()
                        .and()
                    .httpBasic()
            }

            @Override
            public void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
                auth
                    .inMemoryAuthentication()
                        .withUser("user").password("password").roles("USER");
            }
        }
    }
}
1
  • absolutely amazing
    – mvb13
    Nov 1, 2018 at 15:02
7

Second attempt to provide better control of security settings. What's the high level options for controlling security auto configuration:

  • Switch off security completely and permanently:
    • remove Spring Security from the classpath
    • or exlude security auto config - @EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude = SecurityAutoConfiguration.class)
  • Switch off default basic auth security by setting security.basic.enabled=false

It is pretty easy to control different security settings if you have a total control of how security settings, security auto configuration and spring profiles are used.

@Configuration
@ComponentScan
public class Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Throwable {
        SpringApplication.run(Application.class, args);
    }
}

@Configuration
public class WebSecurityConfig {

    @Configuration
    @EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude = SecurityAutoConfiguration.class)
    @ConditionalOnExpression("!${my.security.enabled:false}")
    protected static class DefaultWebSecurityConfig {
    }

    @Configuration
    @EnableAutoConfiguration
    @EnableWebMvcSecurity
    @Profile("local")
    @ConditionalOnExpression("${my.security.enabled:false}")
    protected static class LocalWebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            http
                .authorizeRequests()
                    .antMatchers("/", "/home").permitAll()
                    .anyRequest().authenticated();
            http
                .formLogin().loginPage("/login").permitAll().and()
                .logout().permitAll();
        }

        @Override
        protected void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
            auth
                .inMemoryAuthentication()
                    .withUser("user").password("password").roles("USER");
        }
    }

}

In above classes I basically removed @EnableAutoConfiguration from Application class order to use it conditionally. Created two config classes, DefaultWebSecurityConfig and LocalWebSecurityConfig which are chosen by my.security.enabled flag using a Boot @ConditionalOnExpression.

First config simply excludes SecurityAutoConfiguration if my security is not enabled. Second one enabled security and uses local profile. By creating yet another config with a different profile you can control what happens with different profiles. Then you could choose if security is enabled and which profile is used:

#java -jar build/libs/gs-securing-web-0.1.0.jar
#java -jar build/libs/gs-securing-web-0.1.0.jar --spring.profiles.active=local --my.security.enabled=true

If you have an option to use application.yml, different settings could be automatically applied per profile still defining a default values. This would be good if you just want to disable default basic authentication enabled by default security auto config.

security:
    basic:
        enabled: false
---
spring:
    profiles: local
security:
    basic:
        enabled: true
---

There are probably a million different ways to do these and it's always case by case which works best for current use case.

2
  • This is exactly what I'm looking for, thanks for taking the time to look into this!
    – bvulaj
    Jul 21, 2014 at 18:15
  • should the second @ConditionalOnExpression("${my.security.enabled:false}") actually be true?
    – Neil
    Jul 8, 2016 at 20:03
1

maven will spawn a new process to run a boot app and it doesn't inherit your -Dspring.profiles.active="local" which you passed to mvn command itself.

Why don't you just build the boot fat jar and then run it manually as an executable jar and then you can control what command line parameters you pass to your program.

Other than that, Spring Boot reference doc mentions in a security chapter:

If Spring Security is on the classpath then web applications will be secure by default with “basic” authentication on all HTTP endpoints.

So I just tried this with Securing a Web Application Guide and if I added what you wrote in your question, app defaults to basic authentication when using a profile which is not active.

@EnableAutoConfiguration allows you to define excludes for autoconfiguration classes, but you need to find a way to disable this together with a profile. So possibly wrapping @EnableAutoConfiguration in two different @Configuration classes enabled by different profiles so that other would exclude security auto-configuration.

What we do (in more sophisticated way) in framework itself is a usage of @Conditional which provides better way to enable/disable parts of auto-configuration.

5
  • Is this also the case when I specify @ActiveProfiles or spring.profiles.active in application.properties? The same problem persists with those set as well.
    – bvulaj
    Jul 18, 2014 at 17:44
  • Did update my answer, so let us know what you think. You could also tell what you're chasing here in terms of functionality so that we could help better ;) Jul 18, 2014 at 18:36
  • I think at the end of the day I'm just trying to add some additional settings to the basic auth when ran locally (like formLogin and other things specified above). However, I would want to utilize a different profile with different security settings for running in non-local systems (dev/qa/staging/prod). I'm not sure if that part is important. Am I going down the right path here? Thanks so far!
    – bvulaj
    Jul 18, 2014 at 18:41
  • I actually went ahead and completely disabled the basic auth provided with Boot, and it now works as expected it seems. Was this the correct way to accomplish this?
    – bvulaj
    Jul 18, 2014 at 19:32
  • 1
    Give me some time on this. I was actually doing some boot security stuff yesterday to prepare some other stuff in Spring Hadoop for security. I actually have a similar issue so I'm just consulting my security/boot Spring ninjas. Jul 18, 2014 at 19:58

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