We are developing an application based on sockets. To communicate with server we are using Terminal based on vt320.

We are using some ANSI escape characters to clear screen, start print, end print, for example.

.[H, .[4i, .[5i

Now we are searching how to change the window title of the TE, but without success until now.

Someone could help me?

  • You're using a terminal emulator (TE) running on Windows and you want to change the title of the TE's windows with an escape sequence? If it's possible, then it would be specific to the TE you're using. The concept wouldn't exist for a physical VT320. – HABO Jul 18 '14 at 20:35
  • So, there is no pattern to do this on TE? I mean there is no a default way to change window title using escape sequences? – Marcelo Dias Jul 18 '14 at 21:46
  • A physical VT320 doesn't have a window to put a title on, so DEC would not have created an escape sequence to set the title. A TE could, just like it could let you redefine the keyboard, assign a function to a right mouse click, or replace the bell with a ringtone. If you can find the documentation for the TE that you're using then you might find an answer. – HABO Jul 19 '14 at 3:06
  • I'd suggest you to write your last comment as an answer. That'l allow me to set it as correct answer. – Marcelo Dias Jul 23 '14 at 20:23
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A physical VT320 doesn't have a window to put a title on, so DEC would not have created an escape sequence to set the title. A TE could, just like it could let you redefine the keyboard, assign a function to a right mouse click, or replace the bell with a ringtone. If you can find the documentation for the TE that you're using then you might find an answer.

For example, a vintage NCDware document describes the sequences to configure icon and window titles here. (The feature is apparently common among X-terminals, but not VT terminal emulators.) Another variation on the theme is here.

  • The NCDware document (despite the title) is describing xterm, as one may note from the description of control sequences (see "Use normal/alternate screen buffer" for example). – Thomas Dickey Mar 20 '15 at 9:32

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