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I have an index with something like 60-100 Million documents. We almost always query these documents (in addition to other filter queries and field queries, etc) on a foreign key id, to scope the query to a specific parent object.

So, for example: /solr/q=*:*&fq=parent_id_s:42

Yes, that _s means this is currently a solr.StrField field type.

My question is: should I change this to a TrieIntField? Would that speed up performance? And if so, what would be the ideal precisionStep and positionIncrementGap values, given that I know that I will always be querying for a single specific value, and that the cardinality of that parent_id is in the 10,000-100,000 (maximum) order of magnitude?


Edit for aditional detail (from comment on an answer below): The way our system is used, it turns out that we end up using that same fq for many queries in a row. And when the cache is populated, the system runs blazing fast. When the cache gets dumped because of a commit, this query (even a test case with ONLY this fq) can take up to 20 seconds. So I'm trying to figure out how to speed up that initial query that populates the cache.


Second Edit:

I apologize, after further testing it turns out that the above poor performance only happens when there are also facet fields being returned (e.g. stuff like &facet=true&facet.field=resolved_facet_facet). With a dozen or so of these fields, that's when the query takes up to 20-30 seconds sometimes, but only with a fresh searcher. It's instant when the cache is populated. So maybe my problem is the facet fields, not the parent_id field.

  • Lots of ideas. Have you thought of sharding your index with SolrCloud? This would help spread the burden of building/maintaining the filter cache. How frequently do you commit? Do you prewarm your caches after commits? Have you looked into other hierarchical search solutions like SirenDB? – Doug T. Jul 24 '14 at 2:12
  • (1) We had a solr coach, from his experience he advised to limit an index to ~10 million docs. Keeping that figure in mind you could split your index into 10 shards. (2) the other thing, did you consider an SSD for index storage? – cheffe Jul 24 '14 at 5:45
  • Reacting to your second edit: How are these field types of that facet fields? Are they anything different from plain strings? If so, could you post the definition of their field type from your schema.xml? – cheffe Jul 25 '14 at 6:20
  • @cheffe Good thought. I just checked the schema and they are just normal strings with no analyzers (they are multivalued though). Some of them are boolean or "Yes"/"no" and stuff, so I changed all those that have 2-4 possible values to use the facet.method=enum in the default params for the searcher. Seems to be a minor improvement but it seems like turning on and then tweaking the autowarming may be the best I can do... – Jeff Gran Jul 25 '14 at 18:36
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TrieIntField with a precisionStep is optimized for range queries. As you're only searching for a specific value your field type is optimal.

Have you looked at autowarming queries? These run whenever a new IndexSearcher is being created (on startup, on an index commit for example), so that it becomes available with some cache already in place. Depending on your requirements, you can also set useColdSearcher flag to true, so that the new Searcher is only available when the cache has been warmed. For more details have a look here: https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/solr/Query+Settings+in+SolrConfig#QuerySettingsinSolrConfig-Query-RelatedListeners

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  • I think you may be on the right track. I am not using any autowarming currently. One of my requirements is that any additions or updates to any documents are instantly available. If I use autowarming, and leave on "use cold searcher", will that do what I need? Will the old searcher still use the up-to-date soft-committed documents until the new searcher is warmed? – Jeff Gran Jul 24 '14 at 20:06
  • Also, please see my second edit to the question: does this apply to the facet cache as well? Which cache do I need to auto-warm for that type of query? – Jeff Gran Jul 24 '14 at 20:07
  • I believe that there will be some delay when you introduce autowarming with cold searcher turned off, but you can experiment to find a good balance between the two. Additionally, you might want to enable cache autowarm, esp. for filters: (see wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrCaching#autowarmCount for more details) – spyk Jul 25 '14 at 7:40
  • Regarding your second edit, I think your case is similar to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/21565988/…, which also points at auto-warming. – spyk Jul 25 '14 at 7:40
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It sounds like you probably aren't getting much benefit from the caching of result sets from the filter. One of the more important features of filters is that they cache their result sets. This makes the first run of a certain filter take longer while a cache is built, but subsequent uses of the same filter are much faster.

With the cardinality you've described, you are probably just wasting cycles, and polluting the filter cache, by building caches without them ever being of use. You can turn off caching of a filter query like:

/solr/q=*:*&fq={!cache=false}parent_id_s:42
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  • if I understand correctly, I presume there aren't that many unique parent_id? if so, caching it would make total sense. Given the size of the index, I guess he has appropriate amount of memory available. Anyway @Jeff Gran, just give us the hit ratio you have (and the number of filters you are caching right now) to have better information. – Persimmonium Jul 20 '14 at 7:53
  • @femtoRgon That's a good thought but that doesn't apply for my case. The way our system is used, it turns out that we end up using that same fq for many queries in a row. And when the cache is populated, the system runs blazing fast. When the cache gets dumped because of a commit, this query (even a test case with ONLY this fq) can take up to 20 seconds. So I'm trying to figure out how to speed up that initial query that populates the cache. – Jeff Gran Jul 20 '14 at 15:58
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I also think filter query doesn't help in this case. q=parent_id_s:42 is to query the index by the term "parent_id_s:42" and get a set of document ids. Since the postings (document ids) are indexed by the term, and assuming you have enough memory to hold this (either in JVM or OS cache), then this lookup should be pretty fast.

Assuming filter cache is already warmed up and you have 100% hit ratio, which one of the following is faster?

q=parent_id_s:42
fq=parent_id_s:42

I think they are very close. But I could be wrong. Anyone knows? Any know ran performance test for this?

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