4

I'm looking for a python equivalent to this curl command:

 curl --referer "https://myreferer" --insecure --form "myparam=1234" https://myurl

which results in the following request (taken from httpbin.org/post):

{
  "args": {}, 
  "data": "", 
  "files": {}, 
  "form": {
    "myparam": "1234"
  }, 
  "headers": {
    "Accept": "*/*", 
    "Connection": "close", 
    "Content-Length": "142", 
    "Content-Type": "multipart/form-data; boundary=----------------------------29a1ce32cc53", 
    "Host": "httpbin.org", 
    "Referer": "https://speedport.ip/hcti_start_passwort.stm", 
    "User-Agent": "curl/7.22.0 (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu) libcurl/7.22.0 OpenSSL/1.0.1 zlib/1.2.3.4 libidn/1.23 librtmp/2.3", 
    "X-Request-Id": "c67c4461-89d2-4c9f-a9f4-ebfe312c026c"
  }, 
...

As you can see, the data "myparam" is delivered in a "form" parameter.

I tried to construct such a request via pythons requests module and came close with this code:

import requests
payload={'myparam':'1234'}
url="http://httpbin.org/post"
headers={'User-Agent': 'Mozilla 5.0','referer':'https://myreferer'}
r = requests.post(url, files=payload, headers=headers,verify=False)

But the requests library puts the data in the "files" parameter. So the resulting request looks like this:

{
  "args": {}, 
  "data": "", 
  "files": {
    "pws": "1234"
  }, 
  "form": {}, 
  "headers": {
    "Accept": "*/*", 
    "Accept-Encoding": "gzip, deflate", 
    "Connection": "close", 
    "Content-Length": "143", 
    "Content-Type": "multipart/form-data; boundary=a878ad29e28d47ffb00e0631319ed0e2", 
    "Host": "httpbin.org", 
    "Referer": "https://myreferer", 
    "User-Agent": "Mozilla 5.0", 
    "X-Request-Id": "60f5d65e-789a-47fe-bba3-dab88f9bbb65"
...

So the data is delivered in the wrong place, namely within the "files" parameter, which makes Apache choke with a "501 Not Implemented" response.

Can somebody suggest how to do such a request in Python? (I know I could just call curl as a subprocess but since I want to do many of these requests I'd like to have a python-only soulution (which is hopefully more performant)).

And, as you may have noted, I also need to accept a self-signed certificate and send a referer header.

I would be glad if anybody could suggest an easy way to solve this.

Thanks!

Edit: I already tried using the "data"-param of the requests.post command but this results in a different content type header (application/x-www-form-urlencoded). Please note the content type header of the curl request.

Edit: What I probably need is to simply sending the right Content-Type header, multipart/form-data, via the headers param of the requests.post command. But I would also have to calculate the "boundary"-part of the multipart/form-data header string. I suppose there must be an easer way than manually constructing the header and calculating boundaries.

3

Using file-like object for files results in multipart/form-data content type

Let us prepare all what we need for the call, starting with "usual" stuff:

>>> import requests
>>> data = {"myparam": "1234"}
>>> headers = {'User-Agent': 'Mozilla 5.0','referer':'https://myreferer'}

The trick to force requests to use "multipart/form-data" is to give it at leas one file-like object.

>>> from StringIO import StringIO
>>> buff = StringIO("")

buff is now the file-like object we can pass in as value of files argument.

>>> req = requests.post(url, data=data, headers=headers, stream=True, files=buff)
>>> print req.text
{
  "args": {}, 
  "data": "", 
  "files": {}, 
  "form": {
    "myparam": "1234"
  }, 
  "headers": {
    "Accept": "*/*", 
    "Accept-Encoding": "gzip, deflate", 
    "Connection": "close", 
    "Content-Length": "130", 
    "Content-Type": "multipart/form-data; boundary=0b3bbec1f5c844a1b7377aacfe701f02", 
    "Host": "httpbin.org", 
    "Referer": "https://myreferer", 
    "User-Agent": "Mozilla 5.0", 
    "X-Request-Id": "988a0467-1c32-45aa-a75c-fba5aa8d632e"
  }, 
  "json": null, 
  "origin": "85.160.45.204", 
  "url": "http://httpbin.org/post"
}

If you would communicate with https using self-signed certificate, use verify=False:

>>> req = requests.post(url, data=data, headers=headers, stream=True, files=buff, verify=False)

Help for requests.request also notes, that value of verify could be "A CA_BUNDLE path", so you could explicitly make sure, that the server is using the self-signed certificate you expect. But with this I have never experimented.

  • No, this is not a solution since it results in a different Content-Type header. I already tried this, maybe I should have mentioned. I will edit my post. – Michael Helwig Jul 19 '14 at 6:47
  • @MichaelHelwig Check my modified answer. Now it uses multipart/form-data content type. The trick was to pass in some file-like object. – Jan Vlcinsky Jul 20 '14 at 9:06
  • Thanks, tested it and it works. Nice! – Michael Helwig Jul 21 '14 at 8:40
  • Given that this is undocumented (and I can guarantee, unintentional) behaviour, I would not rely on it, as there's a high likelihood that it may break in future releases of requests. If it does break, bug reports will likely not be considered valid. – Ian Stapleton Cordasco Jul 21 '14 at 12:35
2

Unfortunately if you don't want to send the data as a file, you have to use a third party library -- requests_toolbelt. Once you pip install requests-toolbelt, you can then do

from requests_toolbelt import MultipartEncoder
import requests

payload = MultipartEncoder({'myparam': '1234'})
r = requests.post(url, data=payload, headers={'Content-Type': payload.content_type})

Naturally you can also have the other headers set as well, this is just a quick example of using the toolbelt to your needs.

If you want to validate the certificate, you can pass a string with the full path to the PEM file, e.g.,

r = requests.get('https://somesite.com', verify='/Users/mhelwig/certificate.pem')
  • This is also a valid and working answer, thank you! I didn't know about requests_toolbelt, it seems very helpful for this kind of stuff. – Michael Helwig Jul 21 '14 at 8:41
  • @sigmavirus24 As seen in my answer, you can trick requests with empty buffer. Anyway, +1 for pointing to nice package requests_toolbelt and for showing the use of verify with path to *.pem file. – Jan Vlcinsky Jul 21 '14 at 10:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.