1

How can I turn this:

.btn-primary {
  .open .dropdown-toggle.btn-primary { ... }
}

into

.btn-primary {
  .open .dropdown-toggle& { ... }
}

I keep getting invalid selector after .dropdown-toggle

  • What do you expect from .dropdown-toggle& ? as I know the right term to use & is like &:.class_name.. – Bla... Jul 19 '14 at 14:45
6

If you read the complete error, it should say this:

"&" may only be used at the beginning of a compound selector.

However, .dropdown-toggle.btn-primary is the same as .btn-primary.dropdown-toggle. So place the parent selector at the beginning:

.btn-primary {
  .open &.dropdown-toggle { color: blue; }
}

As of Sass 3.4, you can do that like this:

.btn-primary {
  .open .dropdown-toggle#{&} { color: blue; }
}
  • Thanks. I read the error. But just didn't think of your solution. – Bradford Jul 19 '14 at 14:53
  • The Sass 3.4 addition appears to be the only solution if the nested rule contains a type selector and you want to concatenate that with a class - since a type selector may only appear in the beginning of a compound selector, which means prior to 3.4 this might not have been possible with a nested type selector at all. – BoltClock Apr 14 '15 at 11:42
0

No offense, but I'm not sure you understand what is & used for.. Just in case I'm right here is the explanation:

Sometimes it’s useful to use a nested rule’s parent selector in other ways than the default. For instance, you might want to have special styles for when that selector is hovered over or for when the body element has a certain class. In these cases, you can explicitly specify where the parent selector should be inserted using the & character.

Example:

p{
    background: red;

    &:hover{
        background: blue;
    }

    &:active {
       background: blue; 
    }
} 

Which will be converted to this:

p {
    background:red;
}

p:hover {
    background:red;
}

p:active {
    background:red;
}

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