5

Suppose I have a column in a data frame as colors say c("Red", "Blue", "Blue", "Orange"). I would like to get it as c(1,2,2,3).

Red as 1
Blue as 2
Orange as 3

Is there a simpler way of doing this other than the obvious if/else or switch functions?

1
  • 3
    See match(x, unique(x)) or, on a more formal note, as.integer(factor(x, levels = unique(x)))
    – alexis_laz
    Jul 20, 2014 at 10:50

4 Answers 4

11

Set up a named vector, describing the link between colour and integers (i.e. specifically how the strings map to the integers):

colors=c(1,2,3)
names(colors)=c("Red", "Blue", "Orange")

Now use the named vector to generate a list of numbers associated with the colours in your data frame:

>colors[c("Red","Blue","Blue","Orange")]
   Red   Blue   Blue Orange 
     1      2      2      3 

UPDATE to address questions below. Here's an example of what I think you're trying to do.

dataframe=data.frame(Gender=c("F","F","M","F","F","M"))
strings=sort(unique(dataframe$Gender))
colors=1:length(strings)
names(colors)=strings
dataframe$Colours=colors[dataframe$Gender]

Can have a look at the result:

> dataframe
  Gender Colours
1      F      1
2      F      1
3      M      2
4      F      1
5      F      1
6      M      2

Note that this example assumes that you have no specific mapping between Gender and Colours in mind. If this is really the case, then it might be simpler to just follow the comment from @alexis_laz instead.

8
  • The thing is the number of rows in my data frame runs in the thousands
    – freakyhat
    Jul 20, 2014 at 11:23
  • @user2500781. You could modify CnrL solution to setNames(1:3,unique(dat$colors))[dat$colors] Red Blue Blue Orange 1 2 2 3
    – akrun
    Jul 20, 2014 at 12:01
  • I don't see why this is a problem: thousands=sample(c("Red", "Blue", "Orange"),2000,replace=TRUE); colors[thousands]
    – CnrL
    Jul 20, 2014 at 13:48
  • Maybe you need to clarify the question. Do you have thousands of unique strings or thousands of rows in your column of strings that you need to map to integers, or both?
    – CnrL
    Jul 20, 2014 at 13:53
  • I'll try this out it sounds promising. And I have about a hundred unique strings in the column.
    – freakyhat
    Jul 20, 2014 at 14:37
4

I must be missing something, but this method would work I believe. Having coerced your column with words (below, "names") to a factor, you revalue them by your numbers in "colors".

require(plyr)

colors <- c("1","2","3")
names <- c("Red", "Blue", "Orange")
df <- data.frame(names, colors)
df$names <- as.factor(df$names)
df$names <- revalue(x = df$names, c("Red" = 1, "Blue" = 2, "Orange" = 3))
5
  • "Error in .helpForCall(topicExpr, parent.frame()) : no methods for ‘revalue’ and no documentation for it as a function"
    – freakyhat
    Jul 21, 2014 at 18:15
  • Thank you for the comment. I added require(plyr)
    – lawyeR
    Jul 21, 2014 at 21:44
  • Ah. Thanks for your solution.
    – freakyhat
    Jul 27, 2014 at 3:16
  • If you like it, you can give it a plus, with the up arrow over the 0.
    – lawyeR
    Jul 27, 2014 at 13:02
  • Thanks. The official doc is not clear about whether it mutates the frame or returns a new column and your example resolved my issue. Jul 2, 2022 at 4:50
1

Using car::recode() function:

library(car)

recode(x, "'Red'=1; 'Blue'=2; 'Orange'=3;")
# [1] 1 2 2 3
0

Here is a function based on previous code:

# Recode 'string' into 'integer'
recode_str_int <- function(df, feature) {

  # 1. Unique values

  # 1.1. 'string' values
  list_str <- sort(unique(df[, feature]))

  # 1.2. 'integer' values
  list_int <- 1:length(list_str)

  # 2. Create new feature

  # 2.1. Names
  names(list_int) = list_str
  df$feature_new = list_int[df[, feature]]

  # 3. Result
  df$feature_new

} # recode_str_int

Call it like:

 df$new_feature <- recode_str_int(df, "feature")

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