130

I'm trying to do a Bitcoin payment from within Python. In bash I would normally do this:

bitcoin sendtoaddress <bitcoin address> <amount>

So for example:

bitcoin sendtoaddress 1HoCUcbK9RbVnuaGQwiyaJGGAG6xrTPC9y 1.4214

If it is successful I get a transaction id as output, but if I try to transfer an amount larger than my bitcoin balance, I get the following output:

error: {"code":-4,"message":"Insufficient funds"}

In my Python program I now try to do the payment as follows:

import subprocess

try:
    output = subprocess.check_output(['bitcoin', 'sendtoaddress', address, str(amount)])
except:
    print "Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()

If there's enough balance it works fine, but if there's not enough balance sys.exc_info() prints out this:

(<class 'subprocess.CalledProcessError'>, CalledProcessError(), <traceback object at 0x7f339599ac68>)

It doesn't include the error which I get on the command line though. So my question is; how can I get the outputted error ({"code":-4,"message":"Insufficient funds"}) from within Python?

0

10 Answers 10

183

According to the subprocess.check_output() docs, the exception raised on error has an output attribute that you can use to access the error details:

try:
    subprocess.check_output(...)
except subprocess.CalledProcessError as e:
    print(e.output)

You should then be able to analyse this string and parse the error details with the json module:

if e.output.startswith('error: {'):
    error = json.loads(e.output[7:]) # Skip "error: "
    print(error['code'])
    print(error['message'])
4
  • I'm calling a program that outputs something to stdout and then returns 1, but check_output is not capturing it
    – JorgeeFG
    Commented Apr 21, 2016 at 17:39
  • @JorgeeFG Then I guess there is something wrong with your program. Please note that the comments section is not the right place to ask new questions. If you need help with your particular problem, click the big "Ask Question" button on the top-right of the page. Commented Apr 22, 2016 at 7:32
  • 7
    In Python 3.5+ you can use e.stderr and e.stdout instead of e.output.
    – user3064538
    Commented Apr 9, 2021 at 14:13
  • The output attribute returns everything from the child process. How can we get only a raised error thrown in the child process to return, without all the output? Commented Sep 29, 2022 at 13:40
63

I don't think the accepted solution handles the case where the error text is reported on stderr. From my testing the exception's output attribute did not contain the results from stderr and the docs warn against using stderr=PIPE in check_output(). Instead, I would suggest one small improvement to J.F Sebastian's solution by adding stderr support. We are, after all, trying to handle errors and stderr is where they are often reported.

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

p = Popen(['bitcoin', 'sendtoaddress', ..], stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)
output, error = p.communicate()
if p.returncode != 0: 
   print("bitcoin failed %d %s %s" % (p.returncode, output, error))
8
  • I agree that the stderr output is very relevant here. An alternative solution would be to use the run() function instead (see the check_output docs how to replace). Because then you can use e.stderr from the exception in your error reporting.
    – Sebastian
    Commented May 24, 2017 at 14:04
  • 3
    This should be at the top.
    – Oleg
    Commented Oct 8, 2017 at 17:23
  • 1
    to preserve the apparent order of the output, you could use stderr=STDOUT (to merge both streams).
    – jfs
    Commented May 23, 2018 at 11:38
  • 1
    I think it's good to point out that if you do not call .communicate then the .returncode output will be empty (None) Commented May 24, 2019 at 7:54
  • 2
    In Python 3.5+ you can use .stderr and .stdout instead of .output in the accepted answer.
    – user3064538
    Commented Apr 9, 2021 at 14:12
19

As mentioned by @Sebastian the default solution should aim to use run(): https://docs.python.org/3/library/subprocess.html#subprocess.run

Here a convenient implementation (feel free to change the log class with print statements or what ever other logging functionality you are using):

import subprocess

def _run_command(command):
    log.debug("Command: {}".format(command))
    result = subprocess.run(command, shell=True, capture_output=True)
    if result.stderr:
        raise subprocess.CalledProcessError(
                returncode = result.returncode,
                cmd = result.args,
                stderr = result.stderr
                )
    if result.stdout:
        log.debug("Command Result: {}".format(result.stdout.decode('utf-8')))
    return result

And sample usage (code is unrelated, but I think it serves as example of how readable and easy to work with errors it is with this simple implementation):

try:
    # Unlock PIN Card
    _run_command(
        "sudo qmicli --device=/dev/cdc-wdm0 -p --uim-verify-pin=PIN1,{}"
        .format(pin)
    )

except subprocess.CalledProcessError as error:
    if "couldn't verify PIN" in error.stderr.decode("utf-8"):
        log.error(
                "SIM card could not be unlocked. "
                "Either the PIN is wrong or the card is not properly connected. "
                "Resetting module..."
                )
        _reset_4g_hat()
        return
2
  • 1
    because result.stderr contains bytes, should it rather be if result.stderr.decode('utf-8')?
    – Bendemann
    Commented Sep 4, 2021 at 16:43
  • Finally, this correctly captures those error messages that get printed on the terminal.
    – Vitalis
    Commented Feb 7, 2022 at 6:07
12

Trying to "transfer an amount larger than my bitcoin balance" is not an unexpected error. You could use Popen.communicate() directly instead of check_output() to avoid raising an exception unnecessarily:

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

p = Popen(['bitcoin', 'sendtoaddress', ..], stdout=PIPE)
output = p.communicate()[0]
if p.returncode != 0: 
   print("bitcoin failed %d %s" % (p.returncode, output))
7
  • Python encourages an EAFP programming style (Easier to ask for forgiveness than permission), preferring exception handling over 'if' checks in situations like these. Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 5:45
  • 9
    @FerdinandBeyer: EAFP does not apply in this case: you are not making any calls that you wouldn't make otherwise. The code does not have the LBYL structure: if check(): do() that you could have replaced with EAFP try: do() except Error: handle_error(). The code in the answer inlines check_output() function and avoids raising an exception in the if p.returncode branch only to catch it at the same level. Avoid cargo-cult programming, think
    – jfs
    Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 11:48
  • 2
    We can also do: p = Popen(['bitcoin', 'sendtoaddress', ..], stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE) and capture the error message as: output, error = p.communicate().
    – alper
    Commented Sep 13, 2018 at 11:59
  • How could I do this also for the commands that are using pipe? @jfs
    – alper
    Commented Sep 2, 2019 at 11:40
  • @alper pass the command as a string and add shell=True argument: p = Popen("a | b", shell=True, ..)
    – jfs
    Commented Sep 6, 2019 at 18:30
12

Since Python 3.5, subprocess.run() supports check argument:

If check is true, and the process exits with a non-zero exit code, a CalledProcessError exception will be raised. Attributes of that exception hold the arguments, the exit code, and stdout and stderr if they were captured.

A simple example that will raise and print out CalledProcessError:

import subprocess
try:
    subprocess.run("exit 1", shell=True, check=True, timeout=15, capture_output=True)
except subprocess.CalledProcessError as e:
    print(e)  # Output: Command 'exit 1' returned non-zero exit status 1.
1
  • 1
    all of these are also available: e.cmd e.returncode e.output e.stdout e.stderr Commented Feb 24, 2022 at 5:43
8

This did the trick for me. It captures stdout and stderr output from the subprocess(For python 3.8):

from subprocess import check_output, STDOUT
cmd = "Your Command goes here"
try:
    cmd_stdout = check_output(cmd, stderr=STDOUT, shell=True).decode()
except Exception as e:
    print(e.output.decode()) # print out the stdout messages up to the exception
    print(e) # To print out the exception message
5

There are good answers here, but in these answers, there has not been an answer that comes up with the text from the stack-trace output, which is the default behavior of an exception.

If you wish to use that formatted traceback information, you might wish to:

import traceback

try:
    check_call( args )
except CalledProcessError:
    tb = traceback.format_exc()
    tb = tb.replace(passwd, "******")
    print(tb)
    exit(1)

As you might be able to tell, the above is useful in case you have a password in the check_call( args ) that you wish to prevent from displaying.

1
  • important to be mindful of logging secrets ^
    – mistakeNot
    Commented Apr 1, 2021 at 12:59
2

I think most of previous answers are correct, in my case I needed to do this on Windows server and command was a Powershell, for that this worked really nicely for me:

    try:
        
    
        print("inpgoress")           

        cmd_exec="Get-Date"
        print(cmd_aws)

        subprocess.run(['powershell', '-Command', cmd_exec],shell=False,check=True,capture_output=True,text=True,encoding="utf-8")

        

    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
        print("ERROR: something went wrong executing powershell command")
        raise e  
1

Based on the answer of @macetw I print the exception directly to stderr in a decorator.

Python 3

from functools import wraps
from sys import stderr
from traceback import format_exc
from typing import Callable, Collection, Any, Mapping


def force_error_output(func: Callable):
    @wraps(func)
    def forced_error_output(*args: Collection[Any], **kwargs: Mapping[str, Any]):
        nonlocal func

        try:
            func(*args, **kwargs)
        except Exception as exception:
            stderr.write(format_exc())
            stderr.write("\n")
            stderr.flush()

            raise exception

    return forced_error_output

Python 2

from functools import wraps
from sys import stderr
from traceback import format_exc


def force_error_output(func):
    @wraps(func)
    def forced_error_output(*args, **kwargs):
        try:
            func(*args, **kwargs)
        except Exception as exception:
            stderr.write(format_exc())
            stderr.write("\n")
            stderr.flush()

            raise exception

    return forced_error_output

Then in your worker just use the decorator

@force_error_output
def da_worker(arg1: int, arg2: str):
    pass
-1

The subprocess invoked needs to be told to capture the output in the invoked program and raise the exception. It's simple to do it.

Firstly, Use

subprocess.run() instead of subprocess.call()

Let's assume u wanna python script called "Vijay.py". For raising the exception, use the following;

subprocess.run("py vijay.py", check=True, capture_output=True, shell=True)

The above method then can be put in try and except block to immediately raise the error or can use sys.exit(1) :any non-zero exit is fine

try:
    subprocess.call("py vijay.py", check=True, capture_output=True, shell=True)
except Exception as e:
    print("Exception raised: ", e)

and body of vijay.py can be as follows;

vijay.py

try:
    Your code is here...
except Exception as e:
    sys.exit(1) // or can even use raise Exception("ur own exception to raise:)
enter code here

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