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This question already has an answer here:

I was looking at the JavaScript console in Chrome and noticed something strange, even though they appear the same, obj and JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)) are not the same. Why is that?

var obj = {test:'this is a test', another: {omg:'ay dios mio', check:true}};
console.log(obj, JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)));
console.log(obj == JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)));

They look identical but return false when you check equality. Why is that?

marked as duplicate by Lix, Álvaro González, Satish Sharma, kapa javascript Jul 21 '14 at 12:17

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  • 1
    Not really a duplicate, but the answer there answers your question too. – Lix Jul 20 '14 at 11:37
  • 1
    If you convert both to strings JSON.stringify() then you'll see their values are equal. – Lix Jul 20 '14 at 11:38
  • 3
    MDN: Equality operators [...]If both operands are objects, then JavaScript compares internal references which are equal when operands refer to the same object in memory. – t.niese Jul 20 '14 at 11:39
8

They're not equal for the same reason this returns false:

({omg:'ay dios mio', check:true}) == ({omg:'ay dios mio', check:true})

You're not comparing the values inside the object, but the object references. They'll be different.

4

The objects are testing for REFERENCES.

While primitives are testing for VALUE.

4

Because the obj does not reference the parsed object in memory. So these are 2 different declarations. If you do this:

var a = [ 10 ],
    b = [ 10 ];

Then there are 2 instances of arrays with the same values, but that doesn't make them the same array. So a != b, even though 10 == 10. You can increase the value of a[0] to 15, but that doesn't change the value of b[0] to 15.

Therefore, if you want to compare objects, you have to loop through them and check if the values of the objects are the same.

A function to compare (borrowed from jQuery object equality )

$.fn.equals = function(compareTo) {
  if (!compareTo || this.length != compareTo.length) {
    return false;
  }
  for (var i = 0; i < this.length; ++i) {
    if (this[i] !== compareTo[i]) {
      return false;
    }
  }
  return true;
};
  • But the way they reference are the same, I could have made it objects with just 1 property. That's true. – Niels Jul 20 '14 at 11:40
  • Yes (because arrays are objects). It's just, introducing further non-relevant factors tends to obscure the explanation... – T.J. Crowder Jul 20 '14 at 11:41

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