4

I frequently deal with "binary" protocols that exchange information using some type of COMMAND|LENGTH|PARAMETERS structure where PARAMETERS is any number of TAG|LENGTH|VALUE tuples. Erlang makes short work of extracting values in the message with pattern matching, like:

M = <<1, 4, 1, 2, 16#abcd:16>>. <<1,4,1,2,171,205>>

With the M bitstring (a message following the COMMAND|LENGTH|PARAMETERS format), I can utilize Erlang pattern matching to extract the Command, Length, Parameters:

<<Command:8,Length:8,Parameters/binary>> = M. <<1,4,1,2,171,205>> Parameters. <<1,2,171,205>>

For managing "bit-nibble-byte"-oriented protocols this is invaluable!

Do any other languages come close to supporting syntax like this, even through an add-on library?

4

Something like https://pypi.python.org/pypi/bitstring/3.1.3 for python allows you to do a lot of work at this same level.

From your example:

from bitstring import BitStream
M = BitStream('0x01040102abcd')
[Command, Length, Parameters] = M.readlist('hex:8, hex:8, bits')

gives Parameters as BitStream('0x0102abcd').

| improve this answer | |
  • Looks promising, it's the pattern matching extraction that is key; glancing at the link it wasn't apparent how to map the bit string to variables but I will try it out. – Joe Jul 20 '14 at 16:49
  • Answer will be accepted, I edited it to provide an example of BitStream that mirrors the Erlang. – Joe Jul 20 '14 at 19:19
0

OCaml does, via the bitstring camlp4 extension: https://code.google.com/p/bitstring/

  let bits = Bitstring.bitstring_of_file "image.gif" in
  bitmatch bits with
  | { ("GIF87a"|"GIF89a") : 6*8 : string; (* GIF magic. *)
      width : 16 : littleendian;
      height : 16 : littleendian } ->
      printf "%s: GIF image is %d x %d pixels" filename width height
  | { _ } ->
      eprintf "%s: Not a GIF image\n" filename

Another OCaml library that's not quite as bit-oriented but permits mapping of C values is cstruct: https://github.com/mirage/ocaml-cstruct

This lets you write code inline such as:

cstruct pcap_header {
  uint32_t magic_number;   (* magic number *)
  uint16_t version_major;  (* major version number *)
  uint16_t version_minor;  (* minor version number *)
  uint32_t thiszone;       (* GMT to local correction *)
  uint32_t sigfigs;        (* accuracy of timestamps *)
  uint32_t snaplen;        (* max length of captured packets, in octets *)
  uint32_t network         (* data link type *)
} as little_endian

(see the README of both projects for more information)

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks! Another language to look into, I haven't worked with OCaml before! – Joe Jul 24 '14 at 4:35
0

C of course has a relatively unknown feature of bit fields. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit_field

| improve this answer | |
0

Beyond the already mentioned (Ocaml, Erlang, Python, C) I count at least Racket [1], SmallTalk / Squeak [2], JavaScript [3], Elixr [4] (I realize this is a runs on the Erlang BEAM VM, but I didnt see it mentioned), and Haskell [5]

Also the paper "Applications, Implementation and Performance Evaluation of BitStream Programming in Erlang" by Gustafsson and Sagonas[6] has a short (3 page) section entitled 'Implementation' that covers details on implementing this system as well as efficient abstractions, so you could bring it to a new language with not too much trouble.

1: https://docs.racket-lang.org/bitsyntax/index.html

2: https://eighty-twenty.org/2020/10/07/bit-syntax-for-smalltalk

3: https://github.com/squaremo/bitsyntax-js

4: https://gist.github.com/matthewphilyaw/7898f6cb6444246756cd

5: https://hackage.haskell.org/package/BitSyntax-0.3.2.1/docs/Data-BitSyntax.html

6: https://www.it.uu.se/research/group/hipe/papers/padl07.pdf

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-1

Why do you say it is not valuable?

1> M = <<1, 4, 1, 2, 16#abcd:16>>.                       
<<1,4,1,2,171,205>>
2> <<Command:8,Length:8,Parameters/bitstring>> = M.      
<<1,4,1,2,171,205>>
3> <<Bit:1,Nible:4,Byte:8,Rest/bitstring>> = Parameters.
<<1,2,171,205>>
4> Bit.                                                 
0
5> Nible.                                               
0
6> Byte.                                                
32
7> Rest.                                                
<<85,121,5:3>>
8>
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Invaluable means "extremely useful; indispensable." – Joe Jul 20 '14 at 19:12
  • So it is a new "bad friend" I have to add to my list beside hazard, control... :o) – Pascal Jul 20 '14 at 19:53

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