2

This question already has an answer here:

Is it possible to store a function in PHP object's properties like this:

class testing {
    public $testvars;
    function __construct(){
        $this->testvars = function(){
            return "Test String";
        };
    }
}

If it's possible, how do you call it?

I have been trying to call it like this:

$main = new testing();
$main->testvars();

But it throws an error:

Fatal error: Call to undefined method testing::testvars()

marked as duplicate by Martin Tournoij, Eric, FuzzyTree, Antony, Alma Do Jul 21 '14 at 6:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    check out this answer it has all the details you need stackoverflow.com/questions/4535330/… – Klemen Jul 21 '14 at 6:21
  • try this - $obj = new testing(); echo call_user_func($obj->testvars); – Sougata Bose Jul 21 '14 at 6:26
  • thank you Klemen, that link is helpful.. – Forkiki Jul 21 '14 at 6:38
  • $main->testvars->__invoke(); – FuzzyTree Jul 21 '14 at 6:40
2

Try to call like

$this->testvars();

Considering that you are calling this function in the same class.And if you are calling this in another class you need to add this _call() function

public function __call($method, $args) {
   if(isset($this->$method) && is_callable($this->$method)) {
       return call_user_func_array(
           $this->$method, 
           $args
       );
   }
}

to your new class and you can call it as

$main->testvars();
  • how could it be possible outside the class? – Royal Bg Jul 21 '14 at 6:18
  • Consider my edit – Gautam3164 Jul 21 '14 at 6:23
  • 1
    thank you Gautam3164, it work like a charm.. – Forkiki Jul 21 '14 at 6:39
  • @Forkiki good question too :-) – Gautam3164 Jul 21 '14 at 6:40
  • Question is why to store a closure if you wan't to access it afterwards like a real method of the class instance. Why not just write out the method then? – TiMESPLiNTER Jul 21 '14 at 6:43
1

The real problem is: yes, PHP syntax has lack of support fur such situation. Neither {..} nor (..) may help you. The only way to access the property (without __call() magic) is:

class testing {
    public $testvars;
    function __construct(){
        $this->testvars = function(){
            return "Test String";
        };
    }
}

$obj = new testing();

echo call_user_func_array($obj->testvars, []);

So to pass your callback into call_user_func_array(). Note big difference with passing of [$obj, 'testvars'] (which won't work here, obviously) - since your property contains a callback, but not class contains such method. You may also use call_user_func() of course.

As for syntax support, there is an RFC which is proposed by Nikita Popov and which will allow you to resolve the issue with syntax only - so no additional function calls would be needed (Fortunately, that RFC was accepted and has real chances to be implemented in newer PHP versions).

  • this solution works. I never heard of call_user_func() before. Thank you for pointing it out – user3522371 Jul 21 '14 at 6:28
  • So PHP searches only for valid member methods from object context instead of callables? +1 for the answer – Royal Bg Jul 21 '14 at 6:29
  • The answer depends of what are you meaning with "searches". With -> syntax? Yes. It's method de-reference syntax and PHP will search within current scope for method. That, however, may be "tweaked" for arrays, for example, but not for such situation – Alma Do Jul 21 '14 at 6:30
  • Wow. Then why is the same solution needed for static properties. For example if you assign ot self::$x a closure. Then PHP should be aware of Test::$x() is not a method (to be honest, the error is different - function name must be a string). Shouldn't be all the same as $x() from procedural context? – Royal Bg Jul 21 '14 at 6:35
  • No, it is almost same. PHP won't be aware if it's method or property which you're trying to access (because of syntax, yes). Internally, btw, static methods and usual methods are almost same in byte-code, the difference is just flag (sort of). – Alma Do Jul 21 '14 at 6:37
0

You have to call your closure using call_user_func() or call_user_func_array().

So you can do the following:

$testing = new testing();
echo call_user_func($testing->testvars);

To call your closure outside of the class itself.

  • I run PHP 5.5 and still got the same error. – Royal Bg Jul 21 '14 at 6:20
  • See my updated answer – TiMESPLiNTER Jul 21 '14 at 6:24
  • thank you TiMESPLiNTER, i appreciate your answer.. – Forkiki Jul 21 '14 at 6:41

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