I have noticed very poor performance when using iterrows from pandas.

Is this something that is experienced by others? Is it specific to iterrows and should this function be avoided for data of a certain size (I'm working with 2-3 million rows)?

This discussion on GitHub led me to believe it is caused when mixing dtypes in the dataframe, however the simple example below shows it is there even when using one dtype (float64). This takes 36 seconds on my machine:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import time

s1 = np.random.randn(2000000)
s2 = np.random.randn(2000000)
dfa = pd.DataFrame({'s1': s1, 's2': s2})

start = time.time()
i=0
for rowindex, row in dfa.iterrows():
    i+=1
end = time.time()
print end - start

Why are vectorized operations like apply so much quicker? I imagine there must be some row by row iteration going on there too.

I cannot figure out how to not use iterrows in my case (this I'll save for a future question). Therefore I would appreciate hearing if you have consistently been able to avoid this iteration. I'm making calculations based on data in separate dataframes. Thank you!

---Edit: simplified version of what I want to run has been added below---

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

#%% Create the original tables
t1 = {'letter':['a','b'],
      'number1':[50,-10]}

t2 = {'letter':['a','a','b','b'],
      'number2':[0.2,0.5,0.1,0.4]}

table1 = pd.DataFrame(t1)
table2 = pd.DataFrame(t2)

#%% Create the body of the new table
table3 = pd.DataFrame(np.nan, columns=['letter','number2'], index=[0])

#%% Iterate through filtering relevant data, optimizing, returning info
for row_index, row in table1.iterrows():   
    t2info = table2[table2.letter == row['letter']].reset_index()
    table3.ix[row_index,] = optimize(t2info,row['number1'])

#%% Define optimization
def optimize(t2info, t1info):
    calculation = []
    for index, r in t2info.iterrows():
        calculation.append(r['number2']*t1info)
    maxrow = calculation.index(max(calculation))
    return t2info.ix[maxrow]
  • 4
    apply is NOT vectorized. iterrows is even worse as it boxes everything (that' the perf diff with apply). You should only use iterrows in very very few situations. IMHO never. Show what you are actually doing with iterrows. – Jeff Jul 21 '14 at 17:22
  • 2
    The issue you linked to instead has to do with the boxing of a DatetimeIndex into Timestamps (was implemented in python space), and this has been much improved in master. – Jeff Jul 21 '14 at 17:24
  • 1
    See this issue for a more full discussion: github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/7194. – Jeff Jul 21 '14 at 17:28
  • Thanks for those clarifications Jeff. I'm glad to see you say iterrows can be avoided. I've added an example of how I use it above and I'd love to see how to never use it again :) – KieranPC Jul 21 '14 at 17:34
  • 2
    You will be better off asking a new question for the example (so it will be specific to that). This is more of a general question now. Be sure that your sample runs when copy-pasted (it will not as posed). Provide sample output (expected output) as well. – Jeff Jul 21 '14 at 17:45
up vote 100 down vote accepted

Generally, iterrows should only be used in very very specific cases. This is the general order of precedence for performance of various operations:

1) vectorization
2) using a custom cython routine
3) apply
    a) reductions that can be performed in cython
    b) iteration in python space
4) itertuples
5) iterrows
6) updating an empty frame (e.g. using loc one-row-at-a-time)

Using a custom cython routine is usually too complicated, so let's skip that for now.

1) Vectorization is ALWAYS ALWAYS the first and best choice. However, there are a small set of cases which cannot be vectorized in obvious ways (mostly involving a recurrence). Further, on a smallish frame, it may be faster to do other methods.

3) Apply involves can usually be done by an iterator in Cython space (this is done internally in pandas) (this is a) case.

This is dependent on what is going on inside the apply expression. e.g. df.apply(lambda x: np.sum(x)) will be executed pretty swiftly (of course df.sum(1) is even better). However something like: df.apply(lambda x: x['b'] + 1) will be executed in python space, and consequently is slower.

4) itertuples does not box the data into a Series, just returns it as a tuple

5) iterrows DOES box the data into a Series. Unless you really need this, use another method.

6) updating an empty frame a-single-row-at-a-time. I have seen this method used WAY too much. It is by far the slowest. It is probably common place (and reasonably fast for some python structures), but a DataFrame does a fair number of checks on indexing, so this will always be very slow to update a row at a time. Much better to create new structures and concat.

  • Yes, I used number 6 (and 5). I've got some learning to do. It seems like the obvious choice to a relative beginner. – KieranPC Jul 21 '14 at 17:53
  • 3
    In my experience, the difference between 3, 4, and 5 is limited depending on the use case. – IanS Mar 9 '16 at 10:46
  • 4
    I've tried to check the runtimes in this notebook. Somehow itertuples is faster than apply :( – Dimgold Jul 6 '17 at 10:48
  • pd.DataFrame.apply is often slower than itertuples. In addition, it's worth considering list comprehensions, map, the poorly named np.vectorize and numba (in no particular order) for non-vectorisable calculations, e.g. see this answer. – jpp 2 days ago

Vector operations in Numpy and pandas are much faster than scalar operations in vanilla Python for several reasons:

Amortized type lookup

Python is a dynamically typed language, so there is runtime overhead for each element in an array. However, Numpy (and thus pandas) perform calculations in C (often via Cython). The type of the array is determined only at the start of the iteration; this savings alone is one of the biggest wins.

Better caching

Iterating over a C array is cache-friendly and thus very fast. A pandas DataFrame is a "column-oriented table", which means that each column is really just an array. So the native actions you can perform on a DataFrame (like summing all the elements in a column) are going to have few cache misses.

More opportunities for parallelism

A simple C array can be operated on via SIMD instructions. Some parts of Numpy enable SIMD, depending on your CPU and installation process. The benefits to parallelism won't be as dramatic as the static typing and better caching, but they're still a solid win.

Moral of the story: use the vector operations in Numpy and pandas. They are faster than scalar operations in Python for the simple reason that these operations are exactly what a C programmer would have written by hand anyway. (Except that the array notion is much easier to read than explicit loops with embedded SIMD instructions.)

Here's the way to do your problem. This is all vectorized.

In [58]: df = table1.merge(table2,on='letter')

In [59]: df['calc'] = df['number1']*df['number2']

In [60]: df
Out[60]: 
  letter  number1  number2  calc
0      a       50      0.2    10
1      a       50      0.5    25
2      b      -10      0.1    -1
3      b      -10      0.4    -4

In [61]: df.groupby('letter')['calc'].max()
Out[61]: 
letter
a         25
b         -1
Name: calc, dtype: float64

In [62]: df.groupby('letter')['calc'].idxmax()
Out[62]: 
letter
a         1
b         2
Name: calc, dtype: int64

In [63]: df.loc[df.groupby('letter')['calc'].idxmax()]
Out[63]: 
  letter  number1  number2  calc
1      a       50      0.5    25
2      b      -10      0.1    -1
  • Very clear answer thanks. I will try merging but I have doubts as I will then have 5 billion rows (2.5million*2000). In order to keep this Q general I've created a specific Q. I'd be happy to see an alternative to avoid this giant table, if you know of one: here:stackoverflow.com/questions/24875096/… – KieranPC Jul 21 '14 at 21:34
  • this does not create the Cartesian product - it is a compressed space and is pretty memory efficient. what you are doing is a very standard problem. give a try. (your linked question has a very similar soln) – Jeff Jul 22 '14 at 0:15

Another option is to use to_records(), which is faster than both itertuples and iterrows.

But for your case, there is much room for other types of improvements.

Here's my final optimized version

def iterthrough():
    ret = []
    grouped = table2.groupby('letter', sort=False)
    t2info = table2.to_records()
    for index, letter, n1 in table1.to_records():
        t2 = t2info[grouped.groups[letter].values]
        # np.multiply is in general faster than "x * y"
        maxrow = np.multiply(t2.number2, n1).argmax()
        # `[1:]`  removes the index column
        ret.append(t2[maxrow].tolist()[1:])
    global table3
    table3 = pd.DataFrame(ret, columns=('letter', 'number2'))

Benchmark test:

-- iterrows() --
100 loops, best of 3: 12.7 ms per loop
  letter  number2
0      a      0.5
1      b      0.1
2      c      5.0
3      d      4.0

-- itertuple() --
100 loops, best of 3: 12.3 ms per loop

-- to_records() --
100 loops, best of 3: 7.29 ms per loop

-- Use group by --
100 loops, best of 3: 4.07 ms per loop
  letter  number2
1      a      0.5
2      b      0.1
4      c      5.0
5      d      4.0

-- Avoid multiplication --
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.39 ms per loop
  letter  number2
0      a      0.5
1      b      0.1
2      c      5.0
3      d      4.0

Full code:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

#%% Create the original tables
t1 = {'letter':['a','b','c','d'],
      'number1':[50,-10,.5,3]}

t2 = {'letter':['a','a','b','b','c','d','c'],
      'number2':[0.2,0.5,0.1,0.4,5,4,1]}

table1 = pd.DataFrame(t1)
table2 = pd.DataFrame(t2)

#%% Create the body of the new table
table3 = pd.DataFrame(np.nan, columns=['letter','number2'], index=table1.index)


print('\n-- iterrows() --')

def optimize(t2info, t1info):
    calculation = []
    for index, r in t2info.iterrows():
        calculation.append(r['number2'] * t1info)
    maxrow_in_t2 = calculation.index(max(calculation))
    return t2info.loc[maxrow_in_t2]

#%% Iterate through filtering relevant data, optimizing, returning info
def iterthrough():
    for row_index, row in table1.iterrows():   
        t2info = table2[table2.letter == row['letter']].reset_index()
        table3.iloc[row_index,:] = optimize(t2info, row['number1'])

%timeit iterthrough()
print(table3)

print('\n-- itertuple() --')
def optimize(t2info, n1):
    calculation = []
    for index, letter, n2 in t2info.itertuples():
        calculation.append(n2 * n1)
    maxrow = calculation.index(max(calculation))
    return t2info.iloc[maxrow]

def iterthrough():
    for row_index, letter, n1 in table1.itertuples():   
        t2info = table2[table2.letter == letter]
        table3.iloc[row_index,:] = optimize(t2info, n1)

%timeit iterthrough()


print('\n-- to_records() --')
def optimize(t2info, n1):
    calculation = []
    for index, letter, n2 in t2info.to_records():
        calculation.append(n2 * n1)
    maxrow = calculation.index(max(calculation))
    return t2info.iloc[maxrow]

def iterthrough():
    for row_index, letter, n1 in table1.to_records():   
        t2info = table2[table2.letter == letter]
        table3.iloc[row_index,:] = optimize(t2info, n1)

%timeit iterthrough()

print('\n-- Use group by --')

def iterthrough():
    ret = []
    grouped = table2.groupby('letter', sort=False)
    for index, letter, n1 in table1.to_records():
        t2 = table2.iloc[grouped.groups[letter]]
        calculation = t2.number2 * n1
        maxrow = calculation.argsort().iloc[-1]
        ret.append(t2.iloc[maxrow])
    global table3
    table3 = pd.DataFrame(ret)

%timeit iterthrough()
print(table3)

print('\n-- Even Faster --')
def iterthrough():
    ret = []
    grouped = table2.groupby('letter', sort=False)
    t2info = table2.to_records()
    for index, letter, n1 in table1.to_records():
        t2 = t2info[grouped.groups[letter].values]
        maxrow = np.multiply(t2.number2, n1).argmax()
        # `[1:]`  removes the index column
        ret.append(t2[maxrow].tolist()[1:])
    global table3
    table3 = pd.DataFrame(ret, columns=('letter', 'number2'))

%timeit iterthrough()
print(table3)

The final version is almost 10x faster than the original code. The strategy is:

  1. Use groupby to avoid repeated comparing of values.
  2. Use to_records to access raw numpy.records objects.
  3. Don't operate on DataFrame until you have compiled all the data.

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