104

I have spent quite a few hours pondering the subject of exposing list members. In a similar question to mine, Jon Skeet gave an excellent answer. Please feel free to have a look.

ReadOnlyCollection or IEnumerable for exposing member collections?

I am usually quite paranoid to exposing lists, especially if you are developing an API.

I have always used IEnumerable for exposing lists, as it is quite safe, and it gives that much flexibility. Let me use an example here:

public class Activity
{
    private readonly IList<WorkItem> workItems = new List<WorkItem>();

    public string Name { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<WorkItem> WorkItems
    {
        get
        {
            return this.workItems;
        }
    }

    public void AddWorkItem(WorkItem workItem)
    {
        this.workItems.Add(workItem);
    }
}

Anyone who codes against an IEnumerable is quite safe here. If I later decide to use an ordered list or something, none of their code breaks and it is still nice. The downside of this is IEnumerable can be cast back to a list outside of this class.

For this reason, a lot of developers use ReadOnlyCollection for exposing a member. This is quite safe since it can never be cast back to a list. For me I prefer IEnumerable since it provides more flexibility, should I ever want to implement something different than a list.

I have come up with a new idea I like better. Using IReadOnlyCollection:

public class Activity
{
    private readonly IList<WorkItem> workItems = new List<WorkItem>();

    public string Name { get; set; }

    public IReadOnlyCollection<WorkItem> WorkItems
    {
        get
        {
            return new ReadOnlyCollection<WorkItem>(this.workItems);
        }
    }

    public void AddWorkItem(WorkItem workItem)
    {
        this.workItems.Add(workItem);
    }
}

I feel this retains some of the flexibility of IEnumerable and is encapsulated quite nicely.

I posted this question to get some input on my idea. Do you prefer this solution to IEnumerable? Do you think it is better to use a concrete return value of ReadOnlyCollection? This is quite a debate and I want to try and see what are the advantages/disadvantages that we all can come up with.

EDIT

First of all thank you all for contributing so much to the discussion here. I have certainly learned a ton from each and every one and would like to thank you sincerely.

I am adding some extra scenarios and info.

There are some common pitfalls with IReadOnlyCollection and IEnumerable.

Consider the example below:

public IReadOnlyCollection<WorkItem> WorkItems
{
    get
    {
        return this.workItems;
    }
}

The above example can be casted back to a list and mutated, even though the interface is readonly. The interface, despite it's namesake does not guarantee immutability. It is up to you to provide an immutable solution, therefore you should return a new ReadOnlyCollection. By creating a new list (a copy essentially), the state of your object is safe and sound.

Richiban says it best in his comment: a interface only guarantees what something can do, not what it cannot do.

See below for an example:

public IEnumerable<WorkItem> WorkItems
{
    get
    {
        return new List<WorkItem>(this.workItems);
    }
}

The above can be casted and mutated, but your object is still immutable.

Another outside the box statement would be collection classes. Consider the following:

public class Bar : IEnumerable<string>
{
    private List<string> foo;

    public Bar()
    {
        this.foo = new List<string> { "123", "456" };
    }

    public IEnumerator<string> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.foo.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

The class above can have methods for mutating foo the way you want it to be, but your object can never be casted to a list of any sort and mutated.

Carsten Führmann makes a fantastic point about yield return statements in IEnumerables.

6
  • 2
    Hmm I think you should read great Jon Skeet anwser: stackoverflow.com/questions/491375/… [Possible duplicate]
    – user2160375
    Jul 22, 2014 at 6:59
  • 2
    If you read the question from the top you will find that I referenced John Skeet's answer in my question as a similar question. :) Although the answer is very well written, I believe there are some topics not completely touched on this Jul 22, 2014 at 7:03
  • No problem. Easy to miss it. :) Jul 22, 2014 at 7:08
  • I fail to understand how IReadOnlyCollection can never to cast to List, Cant we do this WorkItems.AsEnumerable().ToList(); ??
    – Ananth
    Aug 7, 2017 at 17:52
  • 1
    Hi Ananth. Good question. It's been quite a while since I have thought of this question and there is much I have learned since. Using WorkItmes.AsEnumerable().ToList() will create a copy of the list and your class won't be mutated. In the case as above, because a new readonly collection is returned, you will never be able to cast it back to a list. Your cast will be null With this said, there is a common pitfall with IReadOnlyCollection. If you return the list in your get, someone can cast it to a list and mutate the state of your object. I will update the question for clarity Aug 8, 2017 at 19:04

5 Answers 5

125

One important aspect seems to be missing from the answers so far:

When an IEnumerable<T> is returned to the caller, they must consider the possibility that the returned object is a "lazy stream", e.g. a collection built with "yield return". That is, the performance penalty for producing the elements of the IEnumerable<T> may have to be paid by the caller, for each use of the IEnumerable. (The productivity tool "Resharper" actually points this out as a code smell.)

By contrast, an IReadOnlyCollection<T> signals to the caller that there will be no lazy evaluation. (The Count property, as opposed to the Count extension method of IEnumerable<T> (which is inherited by IReadOnlyCollection<T> so it has the method as well), signals non-lazyness. And so does the fact that there seem to be no lazy implementations of IReadOnlyCollection.)

This is also valid for input parameters, as requesting an IReadOnlyCollection<T> instead of IEnumerable<T> signals that the method needs to iterate several times over the collection. Sure the method could create its own list from the IEnumerable<T> and iterate over that, but as the caller may already have a loaded collection at hand it would make sense to take advantage of it whenever possible. If the caller only has an IEnumerable<T> at hand, he only needs to add .ToArray() or .ToList() to the parameter.

What IReadOnlyCollection does not do is prevent the caller to cast to some other collection type. For such protection, one would have to use the class ReadOnlyCollection<T>.

In summary, the only thing IReadOnlyCollection<T> does relative to IEnumerable<T> is add a Count property and thus signal that no lazyness is involved.

16
  • 7
    Unfortunately, nothing in IReadOnly* indicates whether an implementation claims to be immutable, or even read-only for that matter (a read-only object may be safely shared with code which must not be allowed to change an object, but would be allowed to see future changes to an object made by someone else who has a "special" reference related to it; many classes which implement IReadOnly* do not meet that criterion).
    – supercat
    Oct 29, 2015 at 21:37
  • 1
    @Richiban: I would call it IReadableList<T>. I would reserve IReadOnlyXX<t> for things which guarantee that no legitimate implementations will expose means of mutation (implying that they may be safely shared with things that must not be allowed to modify the underlying collection) but would not promise that the underlying data store won't be modified in other ways.
    – supercat
    Mar 29, 2016 at 15:01
  • 3
    @supercat Yeah, IReadableList isn't bad... but IReadOnly* doesn't make any sense at all because an interface only guarantees what something can do, not what it cannot do.
    – Richiban
    Mar 29, 2016 at 16:41
  • 2
    @nawfal Unfortunately, ICollection<T> and IReadOnlyCollection<T> both inherit from IEnumerable<T>, but not each other. They both provide a property Count, but here is the catch: LINQ's Count() extension method is optimized for ICollection<T>, not IReadOnlyCollection<T>. This is most unfortunate. github.com/microsoft/referencesource/blob/master/System.Core/…
    – user11523568
    Jul 20, 2019 at 18:28
  • 2
    @dfhwze Your remark is troubling news. I checked several of Microsoft's derivatives of IReadOnlyCollection<T>. Fortunately, all of them also implement ICollection or ICollection<T>. Still, Microsoft left a trap for people writing their own derivatives of IReadOnlyCollection<T>. Jul 20, 2019 at 21:27
29

Talking about class libraries, I think IReadOnly* is really useful, and I think you're doing it right :)

It's all about immutable collection... Before there were just immutables and to enlarge arrays was a huge task, so .net decided to include in the framework something different, mutable collection, that implement the ugly stuff for you, but IMHO they didn't give you a proper direction for immutable that are extremely useful, especially in a high concurrency scenario where sharing mutable stuff is always a PITA.

If you check other today languages, such as objective-c, you will see that in fact the rules are completely inverted! They quite always exchange immutable collection between different classes, in other words the interface expose just immutable, and internally they use mutable collection (yes, they have it of course), instead they expose proper methods if they want let the outsiders change the collection (if the class is a stateful class).

So this little experience that I've got with other languages pushes me to think that .net list are so powerful, but the immutable collection were there for some reason :)

In this case is not a matter of helping the caller of an interface, to avoid him to change all the code if you're changing internal implementation, like it is with IList vs List, but with IReadOnly* you're protecting yourself, your class, to being used in not a proper way, to avoid useless protection code, code that sometimes you couldn't also write (in the past in some piece of code I had to return a clone of the complete list to avoid this problem).

2
  • Very nice answer. The whole idea comes down to one word. Encapsulation. I am always paranoid when I see people exposing a list as a property with a get and set. So dangerous and guaranteed to be misused. Very interesting how other languages handle immutables Jul 22, 2014 at 7:44
  • Thanks! Just for record the mutable/immutable that I was speaking about in objective-c are respectively NSArray and NSMutableArray, the name also speak itself :) Jul 22, 2014 at 8:18
12

My take on concerns of casting and IReadOnly* contracts, and 'proper' usages of such.

If some code is being “clever” enough to perform an explicit cast and break the interface contract, then it is also “clever” enough to use reflection or otherwise do nefarious things such as access the underlying List of a ReadOnlyCollection wrapper object. I don’t program against such “clever” programmers.

The only thing that I guarantee is that after said IReadOnly*-interface objects are exposed, then my code will not violate that contract and will not modified the returned collection object.

This means that I write code that returns List-as-IReadOnly*, eg., and rarely opt for an actual read-only concrete type or wrapper. Using IEnumerable.ToList is sufficient to return an IReadOnly[List|Collection] - calling List.AsReadOnly adds little value against “clever” programmers who can still access the underlying list that the ReadOnlyCollection wraps.

In all cases, I guarantee that the concrete types of IReadOnly* return values are eager. If I ever write a method that returns an IEnumerable, it is specifically because the contract of the method is that which “supports streaming” fsvo.

As far as IReadOnlyList and IReadOnlyCollection, I use the former when there is 'an' implied stable ordering established that is meaningful to index, regardless of purposeful sorting. For example, arrays and Lists can be returned as an IReadOnlyList while a HashSet would better be returned as an IReadOnlyCollection. The caller can always assign the I[ReadOnly]List to an I[ReadOnly]Collection as desired: this choice is about the contract exposed and not what a programmer, “clever” or otherwise, will do.

6

It seems that you can just return an appropriate interface:

...
    private readonly List<WorkItem> workItems = new List<WorkItem>();

    // Usually, there's no need the property to be virtual 
    public virtual IReadOnlyList<WorkItem> WorkItems {
      get {
        return workItems;
      }
    }
...

Since workItems field is in fact List<T> so the natural idea IMHO is to expose the most wide interface which is IReadOnlyList<T> in the case

6
  • 5
    Can't you cast this back into a List<> like mentioned in the question for IEnumerable<>s?
    – Rawling
    Jul 22, 2014 at 7:22
  • 1
    @Rawling: Since ReadOnlyCollection inherits from List, casting it to a list will leave it as a ReadOnlyCollection. Doing this and then attempting to add an element will cause a NotSupportedException: Collection is read-only. Oct 23, 2014 at 15:17
  • 1
    Another alternative is to return an IEnumerable using List.Skip(0) rather than casting to prevent the IEnumerable from being explicitly cast back to a List. See stackoverflow.com/a/491591/1025728 Oct 23, 2014 at 15:32
  • 2
    @JustinJStark ReadOnlyCollection is not involved here. There is a List<T> hidden behind an IReadOnlyList<T> interface and, as the question and your second comment note, you can just cast that back to a List<T>.
    – Rawling
    Oct 23, 2014 at 16:02
  • 3
    Since the returned value can still be cast to List<T> and modified, I'd add call to AsReadOnly and return that. This will ensure the internal value isn't modified. get { return workItems.AsReadOnly(); }
    – JG in SD
    May 17, 2016 at 16:59
-3

!! IEnumerable vs IReadOnlyList !!

IEnumerable has been with us from the beginning of time. For many years, it was a de facto standard way to represent a read-only collection. Since .NET 4.5, however, there is another way to do that: IReadOnlyList.

Both collection interfaces are useful.

<>

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