113

I'm trying to solve the 3n+1 problem and I have a for loop that looks like this:

for(int i = low; i <= high; ++i)
        {
                res = runalg(i);
                if (res > highestres)
                {
                        highestres = res;
                }

        }

Unfortunately I'm getting this error when I try to compile with GCC:

3np1.c:15: error: 'for' loop initial declaration used outside C99 mode

I don't know what C99 mode is. Any ideas?

10 Answers 10

145

I'd try to declare i outside of the loop!

Good luck on solving 3n+1 :-)

Here's an example:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {

   int i;

   /* for loop execution */
   for (i = 10; i < 20; i++) {
       printf("i: %d\n", i);
   }   

   return 0;
}

Read more on for loops in C here.

  • then why don't you use while loop instead? – Erik W Jan 15 '15 at 18:26
  • 2
    @ErikW your question is very bad – user25 May 20 '18 at 21:37
113

There is a compiler switch which enables C99 mode, which amongst other things allows declaration of a variable inside the for loop. To turn it on use the compiler switch -std=c99

Or as @OysterD says, declare the variable outside the loop.

  • 7
    actually -std=gnu99 is probably more desirable since that way you still get gcc extensions (gcc defaults to -std=gnu89, however this will be changing to gnu99 at some point in the next few versions) – Spudd86 Jun 17 '10 at 13:46
  • 3
    @Spudd86: Whether you want to enable gcc extensions depends on what you're doing. Disabling them is helpful if your goal is to write code that's portable to compilers other than gcc. – Keith Thompson Sep 12 '13 at 23:40
20

To switch to C99 mode in CodeBlocks, follow the next steps:

Click Project/Build options, then in tab Compiler Settings choose subtab Other options, and place -std=c99 in the text area, and click Ok.

This will turn C99 mode on for your Compiler.

I hope this will help someone!

  • This helped in codeblocks 16.1 under the Other Compiler options! Though I used -std=gnu99 as depicted in some answers above! – Ankur Shah Apr 10 '16 at 18:20
  • But this helped temporarily! I have to do this every time I compile code!...:( – Ankur Shah Apr 10 '16 at 20:50
  • No, you have not! This must be done for each new project only once. – akelec Apr 11 '16 at 6:57
14

I've gotten this error too.

for (int i=0;i<10;i++) { ..

is not valid in the C89/C90 standard. As OysterD says, you need to do:

int i;
for (i=0;i<10;i++) { ..

Your original code is allowed in C99 and later standards of the C language.

  • 3
    For gcc, throw it a "-std=c99". For additional features, see Imran's answer. – Matt J Jan 29 '09 at 1:19
  • Yes, it is valid C; it's just not valid C89/C90. – Keith Thompson Sep 12 '13 at 23:41
  • @KeithThompson: clarified. – Blorgbeard Sep 13 '13 at 0:10
  • You're still saying it's not valid C, only with a qualification. It is perfectly valid C; the 1999 standard superseded and replaced the 1990 standard, and the 2011 standard superseded and replaced the 1999 standard (though the latter didn't exist when you originally posted this answer). – Keith Thompson Sep 13 '13 at 0:20
  • @KeithThompson Well, that's not what I thought I was saying. Would you consider "is not valid in the C89/C90 standard" correct? – Blorgbeard Sep 13 '13 at 0:33
13

@Blorgbeard:

New Features in C99

  • inline functions
  • variable declaration no longer restricted to file scope or the start of a compound statement
  • several new data types, including long long int, optional extended integer types, an explicit boolean data type, and a complex type to represent complex numbers
  • variable-length arrays
  • support for one-line comments beginning with //, as in BCPL or C++
  • new library functions, such as snprintf
  • new header files, such as stdbool.h and inttypes.h
  • type-generic math functions (tgmath.h)
  • improved support for IEEE floating point
  • designated initializers
  • compound literals
  • support for variadic macros (macros of variable arity)
  • restrict qualification to allow more aggressive code optimization

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C99

A Tour of C99

5

if you compile in C change

for (int i=0;i<10;i++) { ..

to

int i;
for (i=0;i<10;i++) { ..

You can also compile with the C99 switch set. Put -std=c99 in the compilation line:

gcc -std=c99 foo.c -o foo

REF: http://cplusplus.syntaxerrors.info/index.php?title='for'_loop_initial_declaration_used_outside_C99_mode

1

I had the same problem and it works you just have to declare the i outside of the loop:

int i;

for(i = low; i <= high; ++i)

{
        res = runalg(i);
        if (res > highestres)
        {
                highestres = res;
        }

}
1

For anyone attempting to compile code from an external source that uses an automated build utility such as Make, to avoid having to track down the explicit gcc compilation calls you can set an environment variable. Enter on command prompt or put in .bashrc (or .bash_profile on Mac):

export CFLAGS="-std=c99"

Note that a similar solution applies if you run into a similar scenario with C++ compilation that requires C++ 11, you can use:

export CXXFLAGS="-std=c++11"
1

Jihene Stambouli answered OP question most directly... Question was; why does

for(int i = low; i <= high; ++i)
{
    res = runalg(i);
    if (res > highestres)
    {
        highestres = res;
    }
}

produce the error;

3np1.c:15: error: 'for' loop initial declaration used outside C99 mode

for which the answer is

for(int i = low...

should be

int i;
for (i=low...
0

For Qt-creator: just add next lines to *.pro file...

QMAKE_CFLAGS_DEBUG = \
    -std=gnu99

QMAKE_CFLAGS_RELEASE = \
    -std=gnu99

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.