77

I have a table:

CREATE TABLE tblproducts
(
productid integer,
product character varying(20)
)

With the rows:

INSERT INTO tblproducts(productid, product) VALUES (1, 'CANDID POWDER 50 GM');
INSERT INTO tblproducts(productid, product) VALUES (2, 'SINAREST P SYP 100 ML');
INSERT INTO tblproducts(productid, product) VALUES (3, 'ESOZ D 20 MG CAP');
INSERT INTO tblproducts(productid, product) VALUES (4, 'HHDERM CREAM 10 GM');
INSERT INTO tblproducts(productid, product) VALUES (5, 'CREAM 15 GM');
INSERT INTO tblproducts(productid, product) VALUES (6, 'KZ LOTION 50 ML');
INSERT INTO tblproducts(productid, product) VALUES (7, 'BUDECORT 200 Rotocap');

If I execute string_agg() on tblproducts:

SELECT string_agg(product, ' | ') FROM "tblproducts"

It will return the following result:

CANDID POWDER 50 GM | ESOZ D 20 MG CAP | HHDERM CREAM 10 GM | CREAM 15 GM | KZ LOTION 50 ML | BUDECORT 200 Rotocap

How can I sort the aggregated string, in the order I would get using ORDER BY product?

I'm using PostgreSQL 9.2.4.

184

With postgres 9.0+ you can write:

select string_agg(product,' | ' order by product) from "tblproducts"

Details here.

  • can you please suggest a solution which will also work when using window functions? – Saurabh Gujarani May 8 '18 at 5:37
  • Thanks for the link. Searching string_agg in the documentation doesn’t take you there. – Manngo Aug 18 at 5:53
8

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/functions/string-agg-transact-sql?view=sql-server-2017

SELECT
  STRING_AGG(prod, '|') WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY product)
FROM ... 
  • The question was about PostgreSQL. The WITHIN GROUP clause does not apply to the string_agg function, as it does with Microsoft SQL. – Manngo Aug 18 at 6:04
4
select string_agg(prod,' | ') FROM 
  (SELECT product as prod FROM tblproducts ORDER BY product )MAIN;

SQL FIDDLE

  • 2
    I had the same problem as OP, and this approach was my first thought, but unfortunately it doesn't work (which brought me here), whereas Igor's does. – chbrown Feb 4 '16 at 14:13
  • On my side, both approaches (Ilesh's and Igor's) worked. – Stephan Sep 15 '16 at 9:16
  • 2
    Wrong answer. It might work but is not guaranteed to work. – zyamys Mar 15 '18 at 21:13
  • Relational Database is based in part on mathematical sets, and this is reflected in the fact that a basic principle in SQL is that row order is not significant. Even if you were to include an ORDER BY clause in the sub query, the FROM clause doesn’t necessarily get the data in order. If this works, it is pure luck. – Manngo Aug 18 at 7:47

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