5

I want to do the following:

class A{
private:
  //some data
  B b;
  double f(double);
public:
  A(){
    b = new B(f); // does not work of course
  }
};

class B{
public:
  B(double (*func)(double));
};

Class B is supposed to solve a mathematical problem specified by the function func. Class A should now use B to solve this problem for func=f. The member function f accesses the private data members of A. The problem is, of course that I cannot simply pass a pointer to member function. I know there are ways to do that, but B should still be able to take any function, not only members of A. Until now, I just made f and the members of A static, but I think this is a rather bad design. Can you think of any workaround for this?

4
  • 4
    Use a std::function. If you need to shove an object for this into a member function, it's now easy to do so. If the member function doesn't use this, make it a free function or static.
    – chris
    Jul 23, 2014 at 12:48
  • This question looks like similar.
    – Gluttton
    Jul 23, 2014 at 13:00
  • Thank you, std::function looks fine, I will try that later. I'm not really into C++11, so maybe that's why I didn't find it.
    – cthl
    Jul 23, 2014 at 13:10
  • @cthl, boost::function existed before C++11 :)
    – chris
    Jul 23, 2014 at 13:17

5 Answers 5

3

You can use the standard std::function<> template as a polymorphic wrapper for your functions.


Your class B simply store an instance of std::function<double (double)> and call it through foo :

class B
{
  public:
    B(const std::function<double (double)>& func) : func(func) {}

    void foo(double d) 
    {
       std::cout << func(d);   
    }

  private:
    std::function<double (double)> func;
};

While your class A build its B member with one of its member function (f), thanks to std::bind :

class A
{   
  public:
    double md;
    B b;

    double f(double d) const
    {
      return md * d;
    }

  public:
    A(double d) : md(d), b(std::bind(&A::f, this,  std::placeholders::_1)) { }
};

We can now simply use it :

int main() {
   A a(42);
   a.b.foo(2); // Output : 84
}

Live demo here.

3

How about using polymorphism as an alternative to your current design?

For example:

class A
{
protected:
    virtual double f(double x) = 0;
};

class B1 : public A
{
public:
    double f(double x) {return x+1.0;}
};

class B2 : public A
{
public:
    double f(double x) {return x+2.0;}
};

...

A* arr[4];
arr[0] = new B1;
arr[1] = new B2;
arr[2] = new B1;
arr[3] = new B2;
for (int i=0; i<4; i++)
    cout << arr[i]->f(0.0);
4
  • Thanks for your suggestion, but I think I cannot use this for my particular problem. I have to use tens and hundreds of different functions f and all of them depend on the input of the program, i.e. I do not know them in advance. Moreover, I'm working on a mathematical simulation, so performance is really an issue here. With your design I would have millions of calls to virtual functions.
    – cthl
    Jul 23, 2014 at 13:33
  • @cthl Probably the virtual calls is nothing compared to the actual computation. Try it and make the optimisations later if they are really required. I would go for a clean and safe approach with virtual calls:) Jul 23, 2014 at 13:40
  • @cthl: You're welcome. Please note that a virtual function is essentially a function pointer (i.e., in both cases, an additional memory-load operation is applied whenever the function is called). So there is no difference in terms of runtime performance, whether you use one mechanism or the other. Jul 23, 2014 at 13:46
  • @Felics: Thanks. In any case, in terms of runtime performance, there is no difference between using a virtual function and using a function pointer (see my comment above). Jul 23, 2014 at 13:49
2

This a fully working program for your sample.

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

class B
{
    public:
        B(std::function<double(double)> func)
        {
            std::cout<<func(1.0);
        }
};

class A
{
    private:
        std::unique_ptr<B> b;

        double f(double)
        {
            std::cout<<"A::f";
            return 2.0;
        }

    public:
        A() : b(new B(std::bind(&A::f, this, std::placeholders::_1)))
        {
        }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
}

Please note you don't destroy b there and also keep in mind you are passing this to B, thing that might be dangerous (B might be alive after A is destroyed and if you use this inside f... boom!).

I would also suggest avoiding pointers and if this is not possible using std::unique_ptr

EDIT: And a version without b as pointer, std::function and std::bind

#include <iostream>

class A;

class B
{
    public:
        B(A* obj, double(A::*func)(double))
        {
            std::cout<<(obj->*func)(1.0);
        }
};

class A
{
    private:
        B b;
        double f(double)
        {
            std::cout<<"A::f";
            return 2.0;
        }

    public:
        A():b(this, &A::f)
        {
        }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
}
5
  • 1
    There should be a delete for that new B(...) in the dtor (or you could use unique_ptr :) )
    – Scis
    Jul 23, 2014 at 13:33
  • I know, I just pointed that in the answer:) I wanted to keep his original code. I will edit it because it might be confusing Jul 23, 2014 at 13:34
  • Thanks. I know that I have to delete b in the destructor. I just did not write it here to keep things simple. I will try the std::function/std::bind combination now.
    – cthl
    Jul 23, 2014 at 14:27
  • When I try out your example, everything works fine. But in my program the creation of B and thus the call to std::bind yields a segmentation violation...
    – cthl
    Jul 23, 2014 at 15:31
  • Sorry, the segfault was my mistake. Everything works fine now, thank you.
    – cthl
    Jul 24, 2014 at 15:10
0

Since function f() is not static it's type is "double ( A::* )(double)", not "double (*)(double)".

However for this particular case it is better re-design.

Does really A consist of data and instance of problem solver (class B), or A consist of data and delegates some operations to B?

Does really class B need some to know about methods from class A, or it expects data in some format?

class DataType {};
class ResultType {};
class A
{
    DataType data;
    DataType preprocess(Data d) {/*...*/}
    ResultType process() { return B::compute(data); }
    bool isSolvable() { return B::solve(preprocess(data)); }
};
class B
{
public:
    ResultType compute(DataType);
    bool solve(DataType);
};
0

Possible solution:

class A
{
    B* b;
    static double f(double d); //static change function type form `double(A::*)(double)` to `double(*)(double)`
public:
    A()
    {
        b = new B(f);
    }
}

only drawback that f cant take any data form A or B.

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