69

I have always heard that C++ was way more efficient than Java (and that is why most games are developed in C++).

I wrote a small algorithm to solve the "Eight queens puzzle" in both Java and C++, using the exact same algorithm, and then started to raise the number or squares. When reaching checkboards of 20*20 or even 22*22, it appears Java is much more effective (3 seconds vs 66 seconds for C++).

I have no idea why, but I am pretty beginning with C++, so it is possible I made some huge performance mistakes, so I will gladly accept any information that would help me understand what is happening.

Below is the code I use in Java:

import java.awt.Point;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class HuitDames {

    /**
     * La liste des coordnnées des dames.
     */
    private static List<Point> positions = new ArrayList<>();

    /**
     * Largeur de la grille.
     */
    private static final int LARGEUR_GRILLE = 22;


    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int i = 1;
        placerDame(i);
        for (Point point : positions) {
            System.out.println("(" + point.x + "; " + point.y + ")");
        }
    }

    /**
     * Place une dame et return true si la position est bonne.
     * @param i le numéro de la dame.
     * @return si la position est bonne.
     */
    private static boolean placerDame(int i) {

        boolean bonnePosition = false;
        for (int j = 1; j <= LARGEUR_GRILLE && bonnePosition == false; j++) {
            Point emplacement = new Point(i, j);
            positions.add(emplacement);
            if (verifierPrise(emplacement) && (i == LARGEUR_GRILLE || placerDame(i + 1))) {
                bonnePosition = true;
            }
            else {
                positions.remove(i - 1);
            }
        }

        return bonnePosition;
    }

    /**
     * Vérifie que la nouvelle position n'est pas en prise avec une position déjà présente.
     * @param position la position de la nouvelle dame.
     * @return Si la position convient par rapport aux positions des autres dames.
     */
    private static boolean verifierPrise(Point position) {
        boolean nonPrise = true;
        for (Point point : positions) {
            if (!point.equals(position)) {
                // Cas où sur la même colonne.
                if (position.y == point.y) {
                    nonPrise = false;
                }
                // Cas où sur même diagonale.
                if (Math.abs(position.y - point.y) == Math.abs(position.x - point.x)) {
                    nonPrise = false;
                }
            }
        }

        return nonPrise;
    }
}

And below is the code in C++:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

using namespace std;


// Class to represent points.
class Point {

    private:
        double xval, yval;

    public:
        // Constructor uses default arguments to allow calling with zero, one,
        // or two values.
        Point(double x = 0.0, double y = 0.0) {
                xval = x;
                yval = y;
        }

        // Extractors.
        double x() { return xval; }
        double y() { return yval; }
};

#define LARGEUR_GRILLE 22
list<Point> positions;


bool verifierNonPrise(Point emplacement) {
    bool nonPrise = true;
    for (list<Point>::iterator it = positions.begin(); it!= positions.end(); it++) {
        if (it->x() != emplacement.x()) {
            if (it->y() == emplacement.y()) {
                nonPrise = false;
            }
            if (abs(it->y() - emplacement.y()) == abs(it->x() - emplacement.x())) {
                nonPrise = false;
            }
        }
    }

    return nonPrise;
}

bool placerDame(int i) {
    bool bonnePosition = false;
    for (int j = 1; j <= LARGEUR_GRILLE && !bonnePosition; j++) {
        Point emplacement(i,j);
        positions.push_back(emplacement);
        if (verifierNonPrise(emplacement) && (i == LARGEUR_GRILLE || placerDame(i + 1))) {
            bonnePosition = true;
        }
        else {
            positions.pop_back();
        }
    }

    return bonnePosition;
}

int main()
{
    int i = 1;
    placerDame(i);
    for (list<Point>::iterator it = positions.begin(); it!= positions.end(); it++) {
        cout << "(" << it->x() << "; " << it->y() << ")" << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
35
  • 16
    Did you compile your C++-Code with optimization enabled? For gcc and clang add -O3 to the command line. – Baum mit Augen Jul 23 '14 at 15:24
  • 22
    "I have always heard that C++ was way more efficient than Java"-because generally it is. – Benjamin Trent Jul 23 '14 at 15:26
  • 20
    It is not at all unusual for Java to beat C++. A JITC-optimized Java program can be more tightly optimized than is possible using any readily available C++ compiler/linker. Eg, a JITC can easily inline operations on a Point, while C++ can usually only do so if the functions are declared inlineable. – Hot Licks Jul 23 '14 at 15:27
  • 8
    @HotLicks Note that declaring the functions inlinable really has no bearance on whether they are inlined. In this example, Point's methods are implicitly inline. But they aren't even necessary. The data should be public. – juanchopanza Jul 23 '14 at 15:33
  • 9
    @HotLicks Sure, but OP's code, everything is inline. The performance hit is most likely the use of std::list. As for the getters, these would be optimized out too if inlined, but using them could result in extra copies of the data members being made, because semantically they return values. Anyway, it is hard to see how Java could out-perform C++ in such a simple, numeric problem, if coded correctly in both languages. I wouldn't expect C++ to massively out-perform Java either. – juanchopanza Jul 23 '14 at 15:43
92

std::list in C++ is a linked list, whereas java.util.ArrayList is an array. Try replacing std::list by std::vector. Also, be sure to compile with optimization turned on.

11
  • 4
    @realUser404 For me, passing by reference is slower in this case (I guess because the Point object isn't that big). Also, what compiler are you using? For me your original C++ code is already faster than your original Java code when compiled with optimization (g++-4.9 -O2). – Brian Bi Jul 23 '14 at 17:01
  • 10
    Replacing double by int in the Point structure may let the compiler generate even better code. – Jakub Jul 23 '14 at 17:42
  • 22
    @Jakub Good point. Java code with int vs. C++ code with double isn't a fair comparison. – nobody Jul 23 '14 at 18:43
  • 4
    @Jakub My thoughts exactly. Wrong data structure plus wrong data type. Further, in the interests of helping our friend Peter, I think each language has it's own STL quirks. Becoming fluent requires knowledge of the libraries as well as the idioms. – Sinthia V Jul 24 '14 at 0:15
  • 3
    You might want to detail just how the std::list structure is less efficient for this program than std::vector. Is it just a matter that the basic operations (for instance increment of an iterator) on a (doubly linked) list require more cycles than for a vector, or are there things used that are fundamentally slower for lists (like element access by index)? In other words, do the two implementations have the same asymptotic complexity with just a constant factor between them, or not? – Marc van Leeuwen Jul 24 '14 at 13:16
89

Updates:

Changes to C++

  • As written:
    Compilation Failure
  • Replace math.h => cmath
    27610 milliseconds
  • Add -O3 flag
    4416 milliseconds
  • Replace std::list with std::vector
    2294 milliseconds
  • Replace Point with std::pair
    2384 milliseconds
  • Made verifierNonPrise const correct
    2351 milliseconds
  • Replaced loop in verifierNonPrise with std::find_if
    929 milliseconds
  • Replacing double with int (to make it equiv to Java)
    549 milliseconds

Changes to Java

  • As written
    3459 milliseconds
  • Changes verifierNonPrise early return
    368 milliseconds

Java Vs C++

> javac HuitDames.java
> time java HuitDames
real    0m0.368s
user    0m0.436s
sys     0m0.042s    
> g++ -O3 -std=c++11 HuitDames.cpp
> time ./a.out
real    0m0.541s
user    0m0.539s
sys     0m0.002s

Final Code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <cmath>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <chrono>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

typedef std::pair<int, int>   Point;

#define LARGEUR_GRILLE 22
vector<Point> positions;


bool verifierNonPrise(Point const& emplacement) {
    return std::find_if(positions.begin(), positions.end(), [&emplacement](Point const& val){
        if (val.first != emplacement.first) {
            if ((val.second == emplacement.second) || (abs(val.second - emplacement.second) == abs(val.first - emplacement.first))) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }) == positions.end();
}

bool placerDame(int i) {
    bool bonnePosition = false;

    for (int j = 1; j <= LARGEUR_GRILLE && !bonnePosition; j++) {
        Point emplacement(i,j);
        positions.push_back(emplacement);
        if (verifierNonPrise(emplacement) && (i == LARGEUR_GRILLE || placerDame(i + 1))) {
            bonnePosition = true;
        }
        else {
            positions.pop_back();
        }
    }

    return bonnePosition;
}


int main()
{
    using std::chrono::system_clock;

    system_clock::time_point begin_time = system_clock::now();

    int i = 1;
    placerDame(i);
    for (vector<Point>::iterator it = positions.begin(); it!= positions.end(); it++) {
        cout << "(" << it->first << "; " << it->second << ")" << endl;
    }

    system_clock::time_point end_time = system_clock::now();

    long long elapsed_milliseconds = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(end_time - begin_time).count();
    cout << "Duration (milliseconds): "
         << elapsed_milliseconds
         << std::endl;    
}
15
  • #include <algorithm> and #include <chrono> are missing (didn't compile on my compiler without them). Also, -O3 and -Ofast change nothing for timings. Any thoughts why? – Florian Richoux Jul 24 '14 at 1:30
  • Are the times for Replace std::list with std::vector, Replace Point with std::pair and Made verifierNonPrise const correct really different or are the differences just measurement imprecisions? – nwp Jul 24 '14 at 9:19
  • @FlorianRichoux: -Ofast enables optimizations that allow non-standard behaviour, but still behave reasonable in most cases (e.g. optimize aaaa to (aa)*(a*a). There is simply no occasion here where this could lead to measurable improvement. – PlasmaHH Jul 24 '14 at 13:47
  • 2
    @Deduplicator: The difference in speed between the two is (mostly) a myth. Plenty of articles on SO about that. When you see a difference it is because you forgot to call sync_with_stdio – Martin York Jul 24 '14 at 19:40
  • 1
    @Deduplicator: The amount of output is so small I don't expect any measurable difference in speed. Just tried it (no difference). – Martin York Jul 24 '14 at 20:23
30

Test this version, updated using C++11 features. Tested in GCC 4.9.0 with -std=c++11. Tested on Celeron 1.6 GHz, 512 MB RAM.

Times in my PC:
Original: Duration (milliseconds): 12658
First Version: Duration (milliseconds): 3616
Optimized Version: Duration (milliseconds): 1745

Changes are:

  • Using vector instead of list Benchmark, and Words from Stroustrup.
  • Using const whatever we can, the compiler is able to optimize much more if it known that the value don't change.
  • Using std::pair instead of Point.
  • Using new for-loop with constant iterators.

Source:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

typedef std::pair<int, int> Point;

#define LARGEUR_GRILLE 22
vector<Point> positions;

bool verifierNonPrise(const Point& emplacement) {
    bool nonPrise = true;
    for (const auto& p : positions) {
        if (p.first != emplacement.first) {
            if (p.second == emplacement.second) {
                nonPrise = false;
            }
            if (abs(p.second - emplacement.second) ==
                abs(p.first - emplacement.first)) {
                nonPrise = false;
            }
        }
    }

    return nonPrise;
}

bool placerDame(int i) {
    bool bonnePosition = false;
    for (int j = 1; j <= LARGEUR_GRILLE && !bonnePosition; j++) {
        Point emplacement(i, j);
        positions.emplace_back(emplacement);
        if (verifierNonPrise(emplacement) &&
            (i == LARGEUR_GRILLE || placerDame(i + 1))) {
            bonnePosition = true;
        } else {
            positions.pop_back();
        }
    }

    return bonnePosition;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    std::chrono::system_clock::time_point begin_time =
        std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    positions.reserve(LARGEUR_GRILLE);

    placerDame(1);
    for (const auto& p : positions) {
        cout << "(" << p.first << "; " << p.second << ")" << endl;
    }

    std::chrono::system_clock::time_point end_time =
        std::chrono::system_clock::now();
    long long elapsed_milliseconds =
        std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(
            end_time - begin_time).count();
    std::cout << "Duration (milliseconds): " << elapsed_milliseconds
              << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Some more deep changes.

Changes include:

  • Returning as early as possible. As soon as the queen can not be placed.
  • Returning to a simpler Point class.
  • Using find_if algorithm for searching queen placement.

Source (some recommendation updated):

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

struct Point {
    int x, y;
};

#define LARGEUR_GRILLE 22
vector<Point> positions;

bool verifierNonPrise(const Point& emplacement) {
    return find_if(positions.cbegin(), positions.cend(), [&emplacement](const Point& p) {
               return (p.x != emplacement.x &&
                       (p.y == emplacement.y ||
                        abs(p.y - emplacement.y) == abs(p.x - emplacement.x)));
           }) == positions.cend();
}

bool placerDame(int i) {
    for (int j = 1; j <= LARGEUR_GRILLE; j++) {
        Point emplacement{i, j};
        positions.push_back(emplacement);
        if (verifierNonPrise(emplacement) &&
            (i == LARGEUR_GRILLE || placerDame(i + 1))) {
            return true;
        } else {
            positions.pop_back();
        }
    }
    return false;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    std::chrono::system_clock::time_point begin_time =
        std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    positions.reserve(LARGEUR_GRILLE);

    placerDame(1);
    for (const auto& p : positions) {
        cout << "(" << p.x << "; " << p.y << ")" << endl;
    }

    std::chrono::system_clock::time_point end_time =
        std::chrono::system_clock::now();
    long long elapsed_milliseconds =
        std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(
            end_time - begin_time).count();
    std::cout << "Duration (milliseconds): " << elapsed_milliseconds
              << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
9
  • And? How does it perform compared to the original? – juanchopanza Jul 23 '14 at 15:44
  • 2
    Not sure why std::pair? From a design point of view, it is definitely something you would want to avoid. I also doubt that using emplace_back makes a significant difference; it's more fine tuning. (Using std::vector and pass by reference are doubtlessly the big wins.) – James Kanze Jul 23 '14 at 15:50
  • On my machine Original 4296 ms. NetVipeC version 682. Probably some more improvements to be made but already a vast improvement – Benjamin Trent Jul 23 '14 at 15:52
  • @JamesKanze yes in this case emplace_back don't gain nothing, i changed because think that emplacement variable in method placerDame was used only for inserting in the vector and undo when see the calling to verifierNonPrise, but forgot emplace_back. The reason for std::pair was that there is no reason to create a class for something that STD cover, is only more code to maintain, more code to test, even if is so trivial, and std::make_pair (in some compilers do only one allocation for the 2 types), in this case is not much, but creating 1 Million pairs, would be a difference. – NetVipeC Jul 23 '14 at 16:00
  • 3
    @NetVipeC No compiler should do any allocation for anything outside of std::vector here. It would be much cleaner, and no slower, to use a class. Or since you're using C++11, a struct with list initialization. And of course, std::pair is obfuscation here, since the members are not first and second, but x and y (which has a clear semantic meaning); std::pair is convenient for quick experiments, but its use is an anti-pattern in serious code. – James Kanze Jul 23 '14 at 16:31
19

Comparing a managed, dynamically compiled language like Java to a statically compiled language like C++ is very difficult.

You will always be comparing apples to oranges in a sense, because they are conceptually very different. It starts with the use of the standard libraries (ArrayList vs std::list/vector) that will have potentially wildly different performance characteristics, even your code looks similar in both languages.

Then there is the inherent problem with microbenchmarks in Java (short test in Java are always slower because the JIT will observe program flow before it decides what and how it is to be compiled). Same goes for compiler options for C++, even the structure of the source code (independently compiled and linked classes versus single file source) can make a significant difference (because it changes the amount of "insight" the C++ compiler has into the other classes).

Next is the general difference in memory management, garbage collection vs manual memory management (smart pointers etc. are still considered manual memory management).

Not to mention the general language differences like you need to explicitly declare a method virtual in C++, while in Java every member method is virtual by default (working out if it's really virtual at runtime is left to the VM).

With all those differences there will always be cases where one langauge will have a massive advantage over the other. A simple test with very limited scope (like your test here) says very little about each language as a whole.

Another point people often tend to ignore is: How productive can you be with a language - speed isn't everything (look a how sucessful script langages are in some domains, despite being hardly competive when looking only at excution speed). Lack of performance can be crippling, but so can be low productivity.

6
  • 2
    I think the point of the question is that OP would have (rightly) expected C++ to be faster in this particular case, and was surprised to find that it was way slower. There's no apples or oranges here. – juanchopanza Jul 23 '14 at 16:21
  • 7
    @juanchopanza Then the title of the quest should have been "How to improve this C++ code" and it would probably be better simply placed on codereview. While other answers cover possible optimizations well, they all neglect the inherently incomparable aspect - and some of the optimizations suggested make the results even more incomparable. The one right thing was to change the C++ version to vector because its more similar to ArrayList. But everthing else is just increasing the difference between the two implementations where it is comparing apples to oranges. – Durandal Jul 23 '14 at 16:37
  • @Durandal - changing point coordinates from double to int makes it more simmilar to the Java example. And there can by a large preformace difference. – Jakub Jul 23 '14 at 17:49
  • @Jakub While I wholeheartedly agree to your same datatypes make it similar, but my general "apples to oranges" was meant towards optimization attempts like "Returning as early as possible. As soon as the queen can not be placed." where the logic is even fundamentally changed. I did not go trough and check the OP's original code if it was similar in the first place, so I never even noticed that this blunder exists in the original C++ version. I simply trusted when he said exact same algorithm that there were no such fundamental (and unmotivated) differences. – Durandal Jul 23 '14 at 18:05
  • @Durandal My point was, your "The one right thing was to change the C++ version to vector because its more similar to ArrayList. But everthing else is just increasing the difference between the two implementations where it is comparing apples to oranges." was not completly true. The java optimizer may generate better/faster code due to the integregral data type. One of the answere/proposed solutions includes this change. I did not intend to polemize with your remarks on optimization and benchmarking in general. – Jakub Jul 23 '14 at 18:38
3

I may be beating a dead horse here, but simply doing a line by line translation of the Java to C++, not even using const reference parameters or any such thing, you can see the C++ is almost twice as fast as Java. All the "syntactic optimization" emplacing etc. has little effect if any...

rep ~/Documents $ g++ -O3 Queen.cpp
rep ~/Documents $ javac Queen.java 
rep ~/Documents $ time java Queen 
(1; 1)
(2; 3)
(3; 5)
(4; 2)
(5; 4)
(6; 10)
(7; 14)
(8; 17)
(9; 20)
(10; 13)
(11; 19)
(12; 22)
(13; 18)
(14; 8)
(15; 21)
(16; 12)
(17; 9)
(18; 6)
(19; 16)
(20; 7)
(21; 11)
(22; 15)

real    0m4.806s
user    0m4.857s
sys     0m0.067s
rep ~/Documents $ time ./a.out
(1; 1)
(2; 3)
(3; 5)
(4; 2)
(5; 4)
(6; 10)
(7; 14)
(8; 17)
(9; 20)
(10; 13)
(11; 19)
(12; 22)
(13; 18)
(14; 8)
(15; 21)
(16; 12)
(17; 9)
(18; 6)
(19; 16)
(20; 7)
(21; 11)
(22; 15)

real    0m2.131s
user    0m2.113s
sys     0m0.000s
rep ~/Documents $

Queen.java (translated to english)

import java.awt.Point;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Queen {

    private static List<Point> positions = new ArrayList<>();
    private static final int GRID_SIZE = 22;

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        int i = 1;
        placeQueen(i);
        for (Point point : positions) 
        {
            System.out.println("(" + point.x + "; " + point.y + ")");
        }
    }

    private static boolean placeQueen(int i) 
    {
        boolean bIsGoodPos = false;
        for (int j = 1; j <= GRID_SIZE && bIsGoodPos == false; j++) 
        {
            Point emplacement = new Point(i, j);
            positions.add(emplacement);
            if (verifyPos(emplacement) && (i == GRID_SIZE || placeQueen(i + 1))) 
            {
                bIsGoodPos = true;
            }
            else 
            {
                positions.remove(i - 1);
            }
        }

        return bIsGoodPos;
    }

    private static boolean verifyPos(Point position) 
    {
        boolean bIsSafe = true;
        for (Point point : positions) 
        {
            if (!point.equals(position)) 
            {
                if (position.y == point.y) 
                {
                    bIsSafe = false;
                }
                if (Math.abs(position.y - point.y) == Math.abs(position.x - point.x)) 
                {
                    bIsSafe = false;
                }
            }
        }

        return bIsSafe;
    }
}

Queen.cpp

#include <cmath>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Point
{
    int x, y;
    Point(int ii, int jj):x(ii), y(jj){}
};

vector<Point> positions;
int GRID_SIZE = 22;


bool verifyPos(Point position) 
{
    bool bIsSafe = true;
    for(int i = 0; i < positions.size(); ++i) 
    {
        Point point = positions[i];
        if(point.x != position.x || point.y != position.y) 
        {
            if(position.y == point.y) 
            {
                bIsSafe = false;
            }
            if(abs(position.y - point.y) == abs(position.x - point.x)) 
            {
                bIsSafe = false;
            }
        }
    }

    return bIsSafe;
}

bool placeQueen(int i) 
{
    bool bIsGoodPos = false;
    for(int j = 1; j <= GRID_SIZE && bIsGoodPos == false; j++) 
    {
        Point p(i, j);
        positions.push_back(p);
        if(verifyPos(p) && (i == GRID_SIZE || placeQueen(i + 1))) 
        {
            bIsGoodPos = true;
        }
        else 
        {
            positions.pop_back();
        }
    }
    return bIsGoodPos;
}


int main(void) 
{
    int i = 1;
    placeQueen(i);
    for(int i = 0; i < positions.size(); ++i) 
    {
        Point p = positions[i];
        cout << "(" << p.x << "; " << p.y << ")" << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
2

C++ can do it in 21 ms (on a old core i7-860) if you use bit maps. For the timing run I commented out the showSoln() call since a graphic display of the chess board takes twice as long as finding the solution.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <fstream>
#include <omp.h>                        //omp_get_wtime() is my favorite time function
using namespace std;

static const unsigned n(22);            //size of board
static_assert(n<32,"use long unsigned for bit masks if n > 32");
static const unsigned mask((1U<<n)-1);  //n wide bitmask with every bit set

void showSoln(unsigned* selCol, unsigned numSoln) {     //show a solution
    cout << "\nsolution " << numSoln << '\n';
    for (unsigned row=0; row<n; ++row) {
        for (unsigned col=0; col<n; ++col)
            cout << (col==selCol[row]? " Q": " .");
        cout << '\n';
    }
}

void main() {
    //for each row bitmasks that show what columns are attacked, 1 bit means attacked
    unsigned ulAttack[n];           //cols attacked from upper left, shift right for next row
    unsigned upAttack[n];           //cols attacked from straight up, same for next row
    unsigned urAttack[n];           //cols attacked from upper right, shift left for next row
    unsigned allAttack[n];          //OR of all attacks on given row
    allAttack[0]= ulAttack[0]= upAttack[0]= urAttack[0]= 0; //no attacks on row 0
    unsigned row= 0;                //the row where now placing a queen 
    unsigned selCol[n];             //for each row the selected column
    unsigned numSoln= 0;            //count of soutions found
    double wtime= omp_get_wtime();
    for (;;) {                                          //loop until find 1st (or all) solutions
        if (allAttack[row]!=mask) {                     //if 'row' has a column not attacked
            unsigned long bit;
            _BitScanForward(&bit,~allAttack[row]);      //find lowest column not attacked
            //note - your compiler may have a different intrinsic for find lowest set bit
            selCol[row]= bit;                           //remember selected column for this row
            unsigned move= 1U<<bit;                     //convert selected column to bitmask
            allAttack[row]|= move;                      //mark column attacked to prevent re-use
            if (row==n-1) {                             //if move in last row have a soln
                ++numSoln;
                showSoln(selCol,numSoln);
                break;                                  //remove this break if want all solutions
            } else {                                    //no solution yet, fill in rows below
                unsigned nrow= row+1;                   //next row
                //from attacks on this row plus 'move' decide attacks on row below
                ulAttack[nrow]= (ulAttack[row] | move) >> 1;
                upAttack[nrow]= (upAttack[row] | move);
                urAttack[nrow]= ((urAttack[row] | move) << 1) & mask;
                allAttack[nrow]= ulAttack[nrow] | upAttack[nrow] | urAttack[nrow];
                row= nrow;                              //go to next row
            }
        } else {                //else move on 'row' is impossible so backtrack
            if (!row)           //if backtrack from row 0 have found all solutions
                break;
            --row;              //try next move in prior row
        }
    }
    wtime= omp_get_wtime() - wtime;
    cout << "numSoln= " << numSoln << '\n';
    cout << "time= " << wtime*1000 << " msec\n";
}
1

Also, there is no reason to use float/doouble types for the coordinates.

You should gain performance if you do not force calling floating point abs library call in your C++

Java stores the Point coordinates as integer. The get functions return double, however this is probably easier to optimize away in Java, then in c++.

0

It seems that for code that requires not too much memory access and intensive computing the difference between Java an C++ is low. But in the opposite situation the difference looks amazing :

test.java

import java.lang.String;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class test{
    private static Random gna=new Random();

    public static double new_value(double value){
        if (value<0.5) value=0;
        return value*value;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long start_time = System.currentTimeMillis();   
        List<Double> ze_list=new ArrayList();
        for (int i=0;i<1e8;i++){
            double temp=new_value(gna.nextDouble());
            ze_list.add(temp);
        }
        long end_time = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Time (s) :"+ ((end_time-start_time)/1000));
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        String inputval = input.next();
    }
}

and compare it to test.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <ctime>
#include <random>
using namespace std;

static default_random_engine dre1(time(0));
static uniform_real_distribution <double> urd1(0, 1);

static double new_value(double value){
    if (value<0.5) value=0;
    return value*value;
}

int main(void){
        time_t tbegin,tend;
        double texec=0;
        tbegin=time(NULL);
        vector<double> ze_list;
        for (int i=0;i<1e8;i++){
            double temp=new_value(urd1(dre1));
            ze_list.push_back(temp);
        }
        tend=time(NULL);
        texec=difftime(tend,tbegin);
        cout << "\nTime (s) " << texec << " s\n";
        int val=0;
        cin >> val;
    return 0;
}

I just tested it on my Mac :

  • the Java version took 90s and required 3.77 Go
  • the C++ programm took 2s and required only 770 Mo

Maybe there is a possibility to increase Java performances but I cannot see how.

-1

Java passes objects to methods as references and those references are passed by value, but C++ passes objects by value.

You should change C++ code to make it same as Java (Pass pointers in C++ intstead of passing objects):

bool verifierNonPrise(Point* emplacement) // The correct way for passing arguments.

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