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I'm moving from MySQL to PostgreSQL and have hit a wall with user privileges. I am used to assigning a user all privileges to all tables of a database with the following command:

# MySQL
grant all privileges on mydatabase.* to 'myuser'@'localhost' identified by 'mypassword';

It appears to me that the PostgreSQL 9.x solution involves assigning privileges to a "schema", but the effort required of me to figure out exactly what SQL to issue is proving excessive. I know that a few more hours of research will yield an answer, but I think everyone moving from MySQL to PostgreSQL could benefit from having at least one page on the web that provides a simple and complete recipe. This is the only command I have ever needed to issue for users. I'd rather not have to issue a command for every new table.

I don't know what scenarios have to be handled differently in PostgreSQL, so I'll list some of the scenarios that I have typically had to handle in the past. Assume that we only mean to modify privileges to a single database that has already been created.

(1a) Not all of the tables have been created yet, or (1b) the tables have already been created.

(2a) The user has not yet been created, or (2b) the user has already been created.

(3a) Privileges have not yet been assigned to the user, or (3b) privileges were previously assigned to the user.

(4a) The user only needs to insert, update, select, and delete rows, or (4b) the user also needs to be able to create and delete tables.

I have seen answers that grant all privileges to all databases, but that's not what I want here. Please, I am looking for a simple recipe, although I wouldn't mind an explanation as well.

I don't want to grant rights to all users and all databases, as seems to be the conventional shortcut, because that approach compromises all databases when any one user is compromised. I host multiple database clients and assign each client a different login.

It looks like I also need the USAGE privilege to get the increasing values of a serial column, but I have to grant it on some sort of sequence. My problem got more complex.

  • I suspect that the complexity of user privileges on PostgresQL could be a significant impediment to broader adoption. – Joe Lapp Jul 23 '14 at 23:58
  • The following page appears to grant a user the necessary rights to all tables of all databases, whereas I want to only grant rights to a single database. dba.stackexchange.com/questions/36870/… – Joe Lapp Jul 24 '14 at 0:02
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Basic concept in Postgres

Roles are global objects that can access all databases in a db cluster - given the required privileges.

A cluster holds many databases, which hold many schemas. Schemas (even with the same name) in different DBs are unrelated. Granting privileges for a schema only applies to this particular schema in the current DB (the current DB at the time of granting).

Every database starts with a schema public by default. That's a convention, and many settings start with it. Other than that, the schema public is just a schema like any other.

Coming from MySQL, you may want to start with a single schema public, effectively ignoring the schema layer completely. I am using dozens of schema per database regularly.
Schemas are a bit (but not completely) like directories in the file system.

Once you make use of multiple schemas, be sure to understand search_path setting:

Default privileges

Per documentation on GRANT:

PostgreSQL grants default privileges on some types of objects to PUBLIC. No privileges are granted to PUBLIC by default on tables, columns, schemas or tablespaces. For other types, the default privileges granted to PUBLIC are as follows: CONNECT and CREATE TEMP TABLE for databases; EXECUTE privilege for functions; and USAGE privilege for languages.

All of these defaults can be changed with ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES:

Group role

Like @Craig commented, it's best to GRANT privileges to a group role and then make a specific user member of that role (GRANT the group role to the user role). this way it is simpler to deal out and revoke bundles of privileges needed for certain tasks.

A group role is just another role without login. Add a login to transform it into a user role. More:

Recipe

Say, we have a new database mydb, a group mygrp, and a user myusr ...

While connected to the database in question as superuser (postgres for instance):

REVOKE ALL ON DATABASE mydb FROM public;  -- shut out the general public
GRANT CONNECT ON DATABASE mydb TO mygrp;  -- since we revoked from public

GRANT USAGE ON SCHEMA public TO mygrp;

To assign a user all privileges to all tables like you wrote (I might be more restrictive):

GRANT ALL ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA public TO mygrp;
GRANT ALL ON ALL SEQUENCES IN SCHEMA public TO mygrp; -- don't forget those

To set default privileges for future objects, run for every role that creates objects in this schema:

ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES FOR ROLE myusr IN SCHEMA public
GRANT ALL ON TABLES TO mygrp;

ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES FOR ROLE myusr IN SCHEMA public
GRANT ALL ON SEQUENCES TO mygrp;

-- more roles?

Now, grant the group to the user:

GRANT mygrp TO myusr;

Related answer:

Alternative (non-standard) setting

Coming from MySQL, and since you want to keep privileges on databases separated, you might like this non-standard setting db_user_namespace. Per documentation:

This parameter enables per-database user names. It is off by default.

Read the manual carefully. I don't use this setting. It does not void the above.

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    Not worth a separate answer, but I'd just like to also add that in general you should't be GRANTing to individual users. Instead create roles (groups) and grant them rights to tables. Add users to roles when you create the users. This will save you a lot of management pain down the track. – Craig Ringer Jul 24 '14 at 2:17
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    @CraigRinger: Exactly. Here is related answer with demo code: stackoverflow.com/questions/15867175/… – Erwin Brandstetter Jul 24 '14 at 2:21
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    @ErwinBrandstetter, your revision comes close to clarifying another question I have. Why are you mentioning "myusr" in your "ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES" queries? It seems to me that "GRANT mygrp TO myusr" should be sufficient to grant myusr the privileges of mygrp. – Joe Lapp Jul 24 '14 at 23:32
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    @JoeLapp: As long as there is only a single user, you don't need ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES at all. If there are multiple, and each can create objects and you want the other users to share the rights for new objects, grant privileges to the group role automatically. – Erwin Brandstetter Jul 24 '14 at 23:36
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    Just want to add a clarification. A user that creates a resource in a database by default has all privileges to that resource. The purpose of ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES is to give other users access to the resource too. In this example, that's done by granting privileges to mygrp for all resources created by myusr. AWS docs had the sentence that brought me clarity: "Defines the default set of access privileges to be applied to objects that are created in the future by the specified user" (my emphasis). docs.aws.amazon.com/redshift/latest/dg/… – Joe Lapp Sep 23 '16 at 15:24
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Maybe you could give me an example that grants a specific user select/insert/update/delete on all tables -- those existing and not yet created -- of a specific database?

What you call a database in MySQL more closely resembles a PostgreSQL schema than a PostgreSQL database.

Connect to database "test" as a superuser. Here that's

$ psql -U postgres test

Change the default privileges for the existing user "tester".

ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES IN SCHEMA public
    GRANT INSERT, SELECT, UPDATE, DELETE ON TABLES
    TO tester;

Changing default privileges has no effect on existing tables. That's by design. For existing tables, use standard GRANT and REVOKE syntax.

You can't assign privileges for a user that doesn't exist.

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  • I think that's been one of my hang-ups: assuming that MySQL and PostgreSQL databases were analogous entities. Your explanation, combined with Erwin's explanation, corrects that misunderstanding. Thank you! – Joe Lapp Jul 24 '14 at 17:17
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I don't want to grant rights to all users and all databases, as seems to be the conventional shortcut, because that approach compromises all databases when any one user is compromised. I host multiple database clients and assign each client a different login.

OK. When you assign tables to the correct role, the privileges granted will be role-specific and not to all users! Then you can decide who to give roles to.

  1. Create a role for each database. A role can hold many users.
  2. Then assign a client-username to the correct role.
  3. Also assign your-username to each role if needed.


(1a) Not all of the tables have been created yet, or (1b) the tables have already been created.

OK. You can create tables later.
When you are ready, assign tables to the correct client role.

CREATE TABLE tablename();
CREATE ROLE rolename;
ALTER TABLE tablename OWNER TO rolename;


(2a) The user has not yet been created, or (2b) the user has already been created.

OK. Create usernames when you are ready. If your client needs more than one username simply create a second client-username.

CREATE USER username1;
CREATE USER username2;


(3a) Privileges have not yet been assigned to the user, or (3b) privileges were previously assigned to the user.

OK. When you are ready to give privileges, create the user and assign the correct role to her.
Use GRANT-TO command to assign roles to users.

GRANT rolename TO username1;
GRANT rolename TO username2;


(4a) The user only needs to insert, update, select, and delete rows, or (4b) the user also needs to be able to create and delete tables.

OK. You run these commands to add permissions to your users.

GRANT SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT, DELETE ON dbname TO role-or-user-name;
ALTER USER username1 CREATEDB;
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You can forget about the schema if you only use PUBLIC. Then you do something like this: (see doc here)

GRANT { { SELECT | INSERT | UPDATE | DELETE | TRUNCATE | REFERENCES | TRIGGER }
    [, ...] | ALL [ PRIVILEGES ] }
    ON { [ TABLE ] table_name [, ...]
         | ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA schema_name [, ...] }
    TO { [ GROUP ] role_name | PUBLIC } [, ...] [ WITH GRANT OPTION ]
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  • Thanks, but if I use PUBLIC, aren't I granting all users the specific rights to all databases? I'm looking to grant a single user rights to all tables of a single database, even tables not yet created. – Joe Lapp Jul 23 '14 at 19:48
  • I was talking about schema public, not role public. – Str. Jul 23 '14 at 20:50
  • I'm sorry, I guess I don't understand your response. Maybe you could give me an example that grants a specific user select/insert/update/delete on all tables -- those existing and not yet created -- of a specific database? Thanks! – Joe Lapp Jul 23 '14 at 21:33

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