31

I want to quickly identify all writable files in the directory. What is the quick way to do it?

11 Answers 11

39
find -type f -maxdepth 1 -writable
9
  • It issues a warning about the order of options on my system.
    – P Shved
    Mar 22, 2010 at 12:12
  • 5
    -writeable is NOT supported.
    – vehomzzz
    Mar 22, 2010 at 12:23
  • 2
    @Pavel, simply swap the -type f and -maxdepth 1 to get rid of the message Mar 22, 2010 at 12:39
  • if you remove all writable permission to a file and then use the command, does it still find the file? i am curious
    – ghostdog74
    Mar 22, 2010 at 12:40
  • 3
    @vehomzzz For some reason the name of the flag is writable - without an e.
    – h0b0
    Apr 9, 2013 at 11:41
19

The -writable option will find files that are writable by the current user. If you'd like to find files that are writable by anyone (or even other combinations), you can use the -perm option:

find -maxdepth 1 -type f -perm /222

This will find files that are writable by their owner (whoever that may be):

find -maxdepth 1 -type f -perm /200

Various characters can be used to control the meaning of the mode argument:

  • / - any permission bit
  • - - all bits (-222 would mean all - user, group and other)
  • no prefix - exact specification (222 would mean no permssions other than write)
3
  • That's a very elegant solution. How do I modify this to find files that are writable only by the owner.
    – kshenoy
    Aug 18, 2015 at 23:40
  • 5
    @kshenoy: One way: -perm -u+w ! -perm -g+w ! -perm -o+w Aug 19, 2015 at 15:54
  • On Mac or any older Linux variant, use: find -type f +perm 222
    – LanDenLabs
    Sep 1, 2016 at 13:58
4

to find writable files regardless of owner, group or others, you can check the w flag in the file permission column of ls.

ls -l | awk '$1 ~ /^.*w.*/'

$1 is the first field, (ie the permission block of ls -l) , the regular expression just say find the letter "w" in field one. that's all.

if you want to find owner write permission

ls -l | awk '$1 ~ /^..w/'

if you want to find group write permission

ls -l | awk '$1 ~ /^.....w/'

if you want to find others write permission

ls -l | awk '$1 ~ /w.$/'
1
  • the tilde is awk's regex operator for "match". much like Perl's =~ regex operator
    – ghostdog74
    Mar 22, 2010 at 12:50
3

-f will test for a file

-w will test whether it's writeable

Example:

$ for f in *; do [ -f $f ] && [ -w $f ] && echo $f; done
8
  • 1
    Also useless without saying what command these options are meant to be applied to.
    – bignose
    Mar 22, 2010 at 13:40
  • @lexu/bignose - it's a bash question. -f and -w are bash operators. What more do you need ?
    – Paul R
    Mar 22, 2010 at 13:51
  • @Paul R: look at murugaperumal's reply .. (your explanation + his example would receive a +1 from me)
    – lexu
    Mar 22, 2010 at 14:02
  • 1
    I typed -f at the Bash prompt and got a command not found error. /sarcasm Mar 22, 2010 at 15:25
  • 2
    @Paul R, the criticism was because you gave options without saying what command you're referring to. Those options are not "bash operators"; they are options to the test command, also spelled as the [ command.
    – bignose
    Mar 23, 2010 at 1:12
3

If you are in shell use

find .  -maxdepth 1 -type f -writable

see man find

You will find you get better answers for this type of question on superuser.com or serverfault.com

If you are writing code not just using shell you may be interested in the access(2) system call.

This question has already been asked on serverfault

EDIT: @ghostdog74 asked if you removed write permissions for this file if this would still find the file. The answer, no this only finds files that are writable.

dwaters@eirene ~/temp
$ cd temp

dwaters@eirene ~/temp/temp
$ ls

dwaters@eirene ~/temp/temp
$ touch newfile

dwaters@eirene ~/temp/temp
$ ls -alph
total 0
drwxr-xr-x+ 2 dwaters Domain Users 0 Mar 22 13:27 ./
drwxrwxrwx+ 3 dwaters Domain Users 0 Mar 22 13:26 ../
-rw-r--r--  1 dwaters Domain Users 0 Mar 22 13:27 newfile

dwaters@eirene ~/temp/temp
$ find .  -maxdepth 1 -type f -writable
./newfile

dwaters@eirene ~/temp/temp
$ chmod 000 newfile

dwaters@eirene ~/temp/temp
$ ls -alph
total 0
drwxr-xr-x+ 2 dwaters Domain Users 0 Mar 22 13:27 ./
drwxrwxrwx+ 3 dwaters Domain Users 0 Mar 22 13:26 ../
----------  1 dwaters Domain Users 0 Mar 22 13:27 newfile

dwaters@eirene ~/temp/temp
$ find .  -maxdepth 1 -type f -writable

dwaters@eirene ~/temp/temp
3
  • 2
    I see the following error with your solution: find: invalid predicate `-writable'
    – vehomzzz
    Mar 22, 2010 at 12:08
  • sorry had . in wrong place , fixed now, look at man find to see how to user this command Mar 22, 2010 at 12:10
  • if you remove all writable permission to a file and then use the command, does it still find the file? i am curious
    – ghostdog74
    Mar 22, 2010 at 12:40
1
for  var in `ls`
do
if [ -f $var -a -w $var ]
then
echo "$var having write permission";
else
echo "$var not having write permission";
fi
done
1
  • 1
    don't use ls with for loop to parse file names. also quote your variables in the if/else test.
    – ghostdog74
    Mar 22, 2010 at 12:33
1

The problem with find -writable is that it's not portable and it's not easy to emulate correctly with portable find operators. If your version of find doesn't have it, you can use touch to check if the file can be written to, using -r to make sure you (almost) don't modify the file:

find . -type f | while read f; do touch -r "$f" "$f" && echo "File $f is writable"; done

The -r option for touch is in POSIX, so it can be considered portable. Of course, this will be much less efficient than find -writable.

Note that touch -r will update each file's ctime (time of last change to its meta-data), but one rarely cares about ctime anyway.

3
  • Have you tried touch on a read-only file as root or on a file that you own? The ability to update a timestamp does not imply that the file is writable. Mar 23, 2010 at 4:49
  • If you're root, read-only files on writable file systems are writable, so I don't see the problem there.
    – Idelic
    Mar 23, 2010 at 5:57
  • On redhat 4 I get "while: Expression Syntax."
    – jgritty
    Sep 14, 2012 at 23:55
1

Find files writeable by owner:

find ./ -perm /u+w

Find files writeable by group:

find ./ -perm /g+w

Find files writeable by anyone:

find ./ -perm /o+w

Find files with defined permission:

find ./ -type -d -perm 0777
find ./ -type -d -perm 0755
find ./ -type -f -perm 0666
find ./ -type -f -perm 0644

Disable recursive with:

-maxdepth 1
0
stat -c "%A->%n" *| sed -n '/^.*w.*/p'
0

I know this a very old thread, however...

The below command helped me: find . -type f -perm /+w

You can use -maxdepth based on how many levels below directory you want to search. I am using Linux 2.6.18-371.4.1.el5.

0
0

If you want to find all files that are writable by apache etal then you can do this:

sudo su www-data
find . -writable 2>/dev/null 

Replace www-data with nobody or apache or whatever your web user is.

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