68

Hi I was trying to output unicode string to a console with iostreams and failed.

I found this: Using unicode font in c++ console app and this snippet works.

SetConsoleOutputCP(CP_UTF8);
wchar_t s[] = L"èéøÞǽлљΣæča";
int bufferSize = WideCharToMultiByte(CP_UTF8, 0, s, -1, NULL, 0, NULL, NULL);
char* m = new char[bufferSize]; 
WideCharToMultiByte(CP_UTF8, 0, s, -1, m, bufferSize, NULL, NULL);
wprintf(L"%S", m);

However, I did not find any way to output unicode correctly with iostreams. Any suggestions?

This does not work:

SetConsoleOutputCP(CP_UTF8);
utf8_locale = locale(old_locale,new boost::program_options::detail::utf8_codecvt_facet());
wcout.imbue(utf8_locale);
wcout << L"¡Hola!" << endl;

EDIT I could not find any other solution than to wrap this snippet around in a stream. Hope, somebody has better ideas.

//Unicode output for a Windows console 
ostream &operator-(ostream &stream, const wchar_t *s) 
{ 
    int bufSize = WideCharToMultiByte(CP_UTF8, 0, s, -1, NULL, 0, NULL, NULL);
    char *buf = new char[bufSize];
    WideCharToMultiByte(CP_UTF8, 0, s, -1, buf, bufSize, NULL, NULL);
    wprintf(L"%S", buf);
    delete[] buf; 
    return stream; 
} 

ostream &operator-(ostream &stream, const wstring &s) 
{ 
    stream - s.c_str();
    return stream; 
} 
  • Could you clarify exactly how it is failing? Are you getting garbled/wrong characters or something? Have you tried capturing STDOUT and verify the correct bytes are being sent but not displayed maybe? – Goyuix Mar 30 '10 at 20:13
  • It shows placeholders instead of characters. I did not look very much deep into it. The only thing I can tell, is that for some reason, the same string sent to wcout or cout goes crazy while wprintf displays it with no problem. – Andrew Mar 31 '10 at 0:06
  • Only some Unicode characters can be properly displayed inside the Win32 console. The console doesn't support characters that are too complicated or ones that have combining marks that affect their size. Try it with WriteConsoleW -- if it doesn't work with that, then it's impossible. – Mehrdad Jan 29 '12 at 7:09

11 Answers 11

82

I have verified a solution here using Visual Studio 2010. Via this MSDN article and MSDN blog post. The trick is an obscure call to _setmode(..., _O_U16TEXT).

Solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <io.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int wmain(int argc, wchar_t* argv[])
{
    _setmode(_fileno(stdout), _O_U16TEXT);
    std::wcout << L"Testing unicode -- English -- Ελληνικά -- Español." << std::endl;
}

Screenshot:

Unicode in console

  • 4
    +1 and deleted my answer. This is the method we chose for Instalog. – Billy ONeal Apr 24 '12 at 2:01
  • 11
    Doesn't work when you also have std::cout's – Calvin1602 Aug 23 '12 at 14:38
  • 6
    still it doesn't display Japanese characters in my console. – sarat Apr 11 '13 at 9:39
  • 1
    +1 for the fix-that-works, but one should note that that's a VIsual C++ specific solution: it won't necessarily work with g++. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 19 '14 at 13:45
  • 10
    Doesn't work when you also have std::cout's From cplusplus.com: A program should not mix output operations on wcout with output operations on cout (or with other narrow-oriented output operations on stdout): Once an output operation has been performed on either, the standard output stream acquires an orientation (either narrow or wide) that can only be safely changed by calling freopen on stdout. – Roger Dahl Aug 26 '14 at 17:01
5

Unicode Hello World in Chinese

Here is a Hello World in Chinese. Actually it is just "Hello". I tested this on Windows 10, but I think it might work since Windows Vista. Before Windows Vista it will be hard, if you want a programmatic solution, instead of configuring the console / registry etc. Maybe have a look here if you really need to do this on Windows 7: Change console Font Windows 7

I dont want to claim this is the only solution, but this is what worked for me.

Outline

  1. Unicode project setup
  2. Set the console codepage to unicode
  3. Find and use a font that supports the characters you want to display
  4. Use the locale of the language you want to display
  5. Use the wide character output i.e. std::wcout

1 Project Setup

I am using Visual Studio 2017 CE. I created a blank console app. The default settings are alright. But if you experience problems or you use a different ide you might want to check these:

In your project properties find configuration properties -> General -> Project Defaults -> Character Set. It should be "Use Unicode Character Set" not "Multi-Byte". This will define _UNICODE and UNICODE preprocessor macros for you.

int wmain(int argc, wchar_t* argv[])

Also I think we should use wmain function instead of main. They both work, but in a unicode environment wmain may be more convenient.

Also my source files are UTF-16-LE encoded, which seems to be the default in Visual Studio 2017.

2. Console Codepage

This is quite obvious. We need the unicode codepage in the console. If you want to check your default codepage, just open a console and type chcp withou any arguments. We have to change it to 65001, which is the UTF-8 codepage. Windows Codepage Identifiers There is a preprocessor macro for that codepage: CP_UTF8. I needed to set both, the input and output codepage. When I omitted either one, the output was incorrect.

SetConsoleOutputCP(CP_UTF8);
SetConsoleCP(CP_UTF8);

You might also want to check the boolean return values of those functions.

3. Choose a Font

Until yet I didnt find a console font that supports every character. So I had to choose one. If you want to output characters which are partly only available in one font and partly in another font, then I believe it is impossible to find a solution. Only maybe if there is a font out there that supports every character. But also I didnt look into how to install a font.

I think it is not possible to use two different fonts in the same console window at the same time.

How to find a compatible font? Open your console, go to the properties of the console window by clicking on the icon in the upper left of the window. Go to the fonts tab and choose a font and click ok. Then try to enter your characters in the console window. Repeat this until you find a font you can work with. Then note down the name of the font.

Also you can change the size of the font in the properties window. If you found a size you are happy with, note down the size values that are displayed in the properties window in the section "selected font". It will show width and height in pixels.

To actually set the font programmatically you use:

CONSOLE_FONT_INFOEX fontInfo;
// ... configure fontInfo
SetCurrentConsoleFontEx(hConsole, false, &fontInfo);

See my example at the end of this answer for details. Or look it up in the fine manual: SetCurrentConsoleFont. This function only exists since Windows Vista.

4. Set the locale

You will need to set the locale to the locale of the language which characters you want to print.

char* a = setlocale(LC_ALL, "chinese");

The return value is interesting. It will contain a string to describe exactly wich locale was chosen. Just give it a try :-) I tested with chinese and german. More info: setlocale

5. Use wide character output

Not much to say here. If you want to output wide characters, use this for example:

std::wcout << L"你好" << std::endl;

Oh, and dont forget the L prefix for wide characters! And if you type literal unicode characters like this in the source file, the source file must be unicode encoded. Like the default in Visual Studio is UTF-16-LE. Or maybe use notepad++ and set the encoding to UCS-2 LE BOM.

Example

Finally I put it all together as an example:

#include <Windows.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <io.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <locale.h>
#include <wincon.h>

int wmain(int argc, wchar_t* argv[])
{
    SetConsoleTitle(L"My Console Window - 你好");
    HANDLE hConsole = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);

    char* a = setlocale(LC_ALL, "chinese");
    SetConsoleOutputCP(CP_UTF8);
    SetConsoleCP(CP_UTF8);

    CONSOLE_FONT_INFOEX fontInfo;
    fontInfo.cbSize = sizeof(fontInfo);
    fontInfo.FontFamily = 54;
    fontInfo.FontWeight = 400;
    fontInfo.nFont = 0;
    const wchar_t myFont[] = L"KaiTi";
    fontInfo.dwFontSize = { 18, 41 };
    std::copy(myFont, myFont + (sizeof(myFont) / sizeof(wchar_t)), fontInfo.FaceName);

    SetCurrentConsoleFontEx(hConsole, false, &fontInfo);

    std::wcout << L"Hello World!" << std::endl;
    std::wcout << L"你好!" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Cheers !

  • This isn't working for me. Using C with "wprintf(L"你好");" – zezba9000 Mar 31 at 4:08
  • Changed std::copy to "memcpy(fontInfo.FaceName, myFont, (sizeof(myFont)));" and it works in C++ just fine with a .cpp file but not if I compile for C with a .c file. – zezba9000 Mar 31 at 4:21
  • Nvr mind, its working. Just have to make sure your source file is the right UTF-8 encoding (with signature). – zezba9000 Mar 31 at 4:32
3

The wcout must have the locale set differently to the CRT. Here's how it can be fixed:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    char* locale = setlocale(LC_ALL, "English"); // Get the CRT's current locale.
    std::locale lollocale(locale);
    setlocale(LC_ALL, locale); // Restore the CRT.
    std::wcout.imbue(lollocale); // Now set the std::wcout to have the locale that we got from the CRT.
    std::wcout << L"¡Hola!";
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

I just tested it, and it displays the string here absolutely fine.

  • 1
    Thanks for a new idea and it worked for this string but it fails for something more complicated like "¡Hola! αβγ ambulō привет :)" – Andrew Apr 1 '10 at 0:59
  • That string didn't work on wprintf for me either, just came out as a total blank. wcout got at least some of the characters right. Could you double check that wprintf gets this string right? – Puppy Apr 1 '10 at 8:41
  • yes, if you select correct fonts for the console and start it with cmd.exe it works – Andrew Apr 1 '10 at 14:39
  • This code appears to have fixed it for me. Thanks – Coder_Dan Jun 11 '13 at 15:47
  • 4
    -1 for the locale idea + use of _tmain and _TCHAR. fixing the locale only supports characters in that locale's Windows ANSI encoding. it doesn't support general Unicode output (not even UCS2). – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 19 '14 at 13:43
2

SetConsoleCP() and chcp does not the same!

Take this program snippet:

SetConsoleCP(65001)  // 65001 = UTF-8
static const char s[]="tränenüberströmt™\n";
DWORD slen=lstrlen(s);
WriteConsoleA(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE),s,slen,&slen,NULL);

The source code must be saved as UTF-8 without BOM (Byte Order Mark; Signature). Then, the Microsoft compiler cl.exe takes the UTF-8 strings as-is.
If this code is saved with BOM, cl.exe transcodes the string to ANSI (i.e. CP1252), which doesn't match to CP65001 (= UTF-8).

Change the display font to Lucidia Console, otherwise, UTF-8 output will not work at all.

  • Type: chcp
  • Answer: 850
  • Type: test.exe
  • Answer: tr├ñnen├╝berstr├ÂmtÔäó
  • Type: chcp
  • Answer: 65001 - This setting has changed by SetConsoleCP() but with no useful effect.
  • Type: chcp 65001
  • Type: test.exe
  • Answer: tränenüberströmt™ - All OK now.

Tested with: German Windows XP SP3

  • 1
    you can use character constants like \x45 to make the string works regardless of source encoding – phuclv Jun 6 '14 at 3:06
  • 1
    -1 ungood advice to trick the compiler, resulting in incorrect compilation of wide literals. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 19 '14 at 13:41
  • You really want to use escapes so as not to depend on how the non-ASCII characters in the source are saved by the editor and interpreted by the compiler. For example, the UTF-8 string from the answer can be portably written as "tr\xc3\xa4nen\xc3\xbcberstr\xc3\xb6mt\xe2\x84\xa2". – user4815162342 Nov 16 '14 at 11:46
  • SetConsoleCP only affects input, so it is no surprise at all that it doesn't work in your example. It is SetConsoleOutputCP that controls output encoding. – rdb Nov 22 '17 at 14:12
0

I don't think there is an easy answer. looking at Console Code Pages and SetConsoleCP Function it seems that you will need to set-up an appropriate codepage for the character-set you're going to output.

0

Recenly I wanted to stream unicode from Python to windows console and here is the minimum I needed to make:

  • You should set console font to the one covering unicode symbols. There is not a wide choise: Console properties > Font > Lucida Console
  • You should change the current console codepage: run chcp 65001 in the Console or use the corresponding method in the C++ code
  • write to console using WriteConsoleW

Look through an interesing article about java unicode on windows console

Besides, in Python you can not write to default sys.stdout in this case, you will need to substitute it with something using os.write(1, binarystring) or direct call to a wrapper around WriteConsoleW. Seems like in C++ you will need to do the same.

  • 4
    You do need to set the font, this part is correct and it is poor design of Windows not to default to a font that works for a decent range of Unicode characters. However the next part of your answer is wrong. You do NOT need to set the codepage to UTF-8/65001 AND call WriteConsoleW. You need to do one OR the other. Set the codepage if you will be calling WriteConsoleA and passing in 8-bit strings including UTF-8, BUT just calling WriteConsoleW completely bypasses codepages and requires UTF-16 (wide chars). In my experience however, setting the console to 65001 is quite buggy. – hippietrail Feb 17 '11 at 6:48
  • @hippietrail: I am not sure about writing with WriteConsoleW without changing the codepage to 65001, but setting to 65001 only is unfortunately not enough. At least for unicode output from Python scripts. – newtover Mar 24 '11 at 19:44
0

First, sorry I probably don't have the fonts required so I cannot test it yet.

Something looks a bit fishy here

// the following is said to be working
SetConsoleOutputCP(CP_UTF8); // output is in UTF8
wchar_t s[] = L"èéøÞǽлљΣæča";
int bufferSize = WideCharToMultiByte(CP_UTF8, 0, s, -1, NULL, 0, NULL, NULL);
char* m = new char[bufferSize]; 
WideCharToMultiByte(CP_UTF8, 0, s, -1, m, bufferSize, NULL, NULL);
wprintf(L"%S", m); // <-- upper case %S in wprintf() is used for MultiByte/utf-8
                   //     lower case %s in wprintf() is used for WideChar
printf("%s", m); // <-- does this work as well? try it to verify my assumption

while

// the following is said to have problem
SetConsoleOutputCP(CP_UTF8);
utf8_locale = locale(old_locale,
                     new boost::program_options::detail::utf8_codecvt_facet());
wcout.imbue(utf8_locale);
wcout << L"¡Hola!" << endl; // <-- you are passing wide char.
// have you tried passing the multibyte equivalent by converting to utf8 first?
int bufferSize = WideCharToMultiByte(CP_UTF8, 0, s, -1, NULL, 0, NULL, NULL);
char* m = new char[bufferSize]; 
WideCharToMultiByte(CP_UTF8, 0, s, -1, m, bufferSize, NULL, NULL);
cout << m << endl;

what about

// without setting locale to UTF8, you pass WideChars
wcout << L"¡Hola!" << endl;
// set locale to UTF8 and use cout
SetConsoleOutputCP(CP_UTF8);
cout << utf8_encoded_by_converting_using_WideCharToMultiByte << endl;
  • That is the fun part. I tried it and I was surprised that it does not work, but thanks anyways – Andrew Apr 5 '10 at 14:24
0

There are a few issues with the mswcrt and io streams.

  1. Trick _setmode(_fileno(stdout), _O_U16TEXT); working only for MS VC++ not MinGW-GCC. Moreover sometimes it is brings to crashes depending on Windows configuration.
  2. SetConsoleCP(65001) for UTF-8. May fail in many multibyte character scenarios, but is is always OK for UTF-16LE
  3. You need to restore previews console codepage on application exit.

Windows console supports UNICODE with the ReadConsole and WriteConsole functions in UTF-16LE mode. Background effect - piping in this case will not work. I.e. myapp.exe >> ret.log brings to 0 byte ret.log file. If you are ok with this fact you can try my library as following.

const char* umessage = "Hello!\nПривет!\nПривіт!\nΧαιρετίσματα!\nHelló!\nHallå!\n";

...
#include <console.hpp>
#include <ios>
...

std::ostream& cout = io::console::out_stream();
cout << umessage
<< 1234567890ull << '\n'
<< 123456.78e+09 << '\n'
<< 12356.789e+10L << '\n'
<< std::hex << 0xCAFEBABE
<< std::endl;

Library will auto-convert your UTF-8 into UTF-16LE and write it into console using WriteConsole. As well as there are error and input streams. Another library benefit - colors.

Link on example app: https://github.com/incoder1/IO/tree/master/examples/iostreams

The library homepage: https://github.com/incoder1/IO

Screenshot:

0

Default encoding on:

  • Windows UTF-16.
  • Linux UTF-8.
  • MacOS UTF-8.

My solution Steps, includes null chars \0 (avoid truncated). Without using functions on windows.h header:

  1. Add Macros to detect Platform.
#if defined (_WIN32) 
#define WINDOWSLIB 1

#elif defined (__ANDROID__) || defined(ANDROID)//Android
#define ANDROIDLIB 1

#elif defined (__APPLE__)//iOS, Mac OS
#define MACOSLIB 1

#elif defined (__LINUX__) || defined(__gnu_linux__) || defined(__linux__)//_Ubuntu - Fedora - Centos - RedHat
#define LINUXLIB 1
#endif
  1. Create conversion functions std::wstring to std::string or viceversa.
#include <locale>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
#include <Windows.h>
#endif

using namespace std::literals::string_literals;

// Convert std::wstring to std::string
std::string WidestringToString(const std::wstring& wstr, const std::string& locale)
{
    if (wstr.empty())
    {
        return std::string();
    }
    size_t pos;
    size_t begin = 0;
    std::string ret;
    size_t  size;
#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
    _locale_t lc = _create_locale(LC_ALL, locale.c_str());
    pos = wstr.find(static_cast<wchar_t>(0), begin);
    while (pos != std::wstring::npos && begin < wstr.length())
    {
        std::wstring segment = std::wstring(&wstr[begin], pos - begin);
        _wcstombs_s_l(&size, nullptr, 0, &segment[0], _TRUNCATE, lc);
        std::string converted = std::string(size, 0);
        _wcstombs_s_l(&size, &converted[0], size, &segment[0], _TRUNCATE, lc);
        ret.append(converted);
        begin = pos + 1;
        pos = wstr.find(static_cast<wchar_t>(0), begin);
    }
    if (begin <= wstr.length()) {
        std::wstring segment = std::wstring(&wstr[begin], wstr.length() - begin);
        _wcstombs_s_l(&size, nullptr, 0, &segment[0], _TRUNCATE, lc);
        std::string converted = std::string(size, 0);
        _wcstombs_s_l(&size, &converted[0], size, &segment[0], _TRUNCATE, lc);
        converted.resize(size - 1);
        ret.append(converted);
    }
    _free_locale(lc);
#elif defined LINUXLIB
    std::string currentLocale = setlocale(LC_ALL, nullptr);
    setlocale(LC_ALL, locale.c_str());
    pos = wstr.find(static_cast<wchar_t>(0), begin);
    while (pos != std::wstring::npos && begin < wstr.length())
    {
        std::wstring segment = std::wstring(&wstr[begin], pos - begin);
        size = wcstombs(nullptr, segment.c_str(), 0);
        std::string converted = std::string(size, 0);
        wcstombs(&converted[0], segment.c_str(), converted.size());
        ret.append(converted);
        ret.append({ 0 });
        begin = pos + 1;
        pos = wstr.find(static_cast<wchar_t>(0), begin);
    }
    if (begin <= wstr.length()) {
        std::wstring segment = std::wstring(&wstr[begin], wstr.length() - begin);
        size = wcstombs(nullptr, segment.c_str(), 0);
        std::string converted = std::string(size, 0);
        wcstombs(&converted[0], segment.c_str(), converted.size());
        ret.append(converted);
    }
    setlocale(LC_ALL, currentLocale.c_str());
#elif defined MACOSLIB
#endif

    return ret;
}

// Convert std::string to std::wstring
std::wstring StringToWideString(const std::string& str, const std::string& locale)
{
    if (str.empty())
    {
        return std::wstring();
    }

    size_t pos;
    size_t begin = 0;
    std::wstring ret;
    size_t  size;

#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
    _locale_t lc = _create_locale(LC_ALL, locale.c_str());
    pos = str.find(static_cast<char>(0), begin);
    while (pos != std::string::npos) {
        std::string segment = std::string(&str[begin], pos - begin);
        std::wstring converted = std::wstring(segment.size() + 1, 0);
        _mbstowcs_s_l(&size, &converted[0], converted.size(), &segment[0], _TRUNCATE, lc);
        converted.resize(size - 1);
        ret.append(converted);
        ret.append({ 0 });
        begin = pos + 1;
        pos = str.find(static_cast<char>(0), begin);
    }
    if (begin < str.length()) {
        std::string segment = std::string(&str[begin], str.length() - begin);
        std::wstring converted = std::wstring(segment.size() + 1, 0);
        _mbstowcs_s_l(&size, &converted[0], converted.size(), &segment[0], _TRUNCATE, lc);
        converted.resize(size - 1);
        ret.append(converted);
    }
    _free_locale(lc);
#elif defined LINUXLIB
    std::string currentLocale = setlocale(LC_ALL, nullptr);
    setlocale(LC_ALL, locale.c_str());
    pos = str.find(static_cast<char>(0), begin);
    while (pos != std::string::npos) {
        std::string segment = std::string(&str[begin], pos - begin);
        std::wstring converted = std::wstring(segment.size(), 0);
        size = mbstowcs(&converted[0], &segment[0], converted.size());
        converted.resize(size);
        ret.append(converted);
        ret.append({ 0 });
        begin = pos + 1;
        pos = str.find(static_cast<char>(0), begin);
    }
    if (begin < str.length()) {
        std::string segment = std::string(&str[begin], str.length() - begin);
        std::wstring converted = std::wstring(segment.size(), 0);
        size = mbstowcs(&converted[0], &segment[0], converted.size());
        converted.resize(size);
        ret.append(converted);
    }
    setlocale(LC_ALL, currentLocale.c_str());
#elif defined MACOSLIB
#endif

    return ret;
}
  1. Print std::string. Check RawString Suffix.

Linux Code. Print directly std::string using std::cout.
If you have std::wstring.
1. Convert to std::string.
2. Print with std::cout.

std::wstring x = L"\0\001日本ABC\0DE\0F\0G🐶\0"s;
std::string result = WidestringToString(x, "en_US.UTF-8");
std::cout << "RESULT=" << result << std::endl;
std::cout << "RESULT_SIZE=" << result.size() << std::endl;

On Windows if you need to print unicode. We need to use WriteConsole for print unicode chars from std::wstring or std::string.

void WriteUnicodeLine(const std::string& s)
{
#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
    WriteUnicode(s);
    std::cout << std::endl;
#elif defined LINUXLIB
    std::cout << s << std::endl;
#elif defined MACOSLIB
#endif
}

void WriteUnicode(const std::string& s)
{

#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
    std::wstring unicode = Insane::String::Strings::StringToWideString(s);
    WriteConsole(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), unicode.c_str(), static_cast<DWORD>(unicode.length()), nullptr, nullptr);
#elif defined LINUXLIB
    std::cout << s;
#elif defined MACOSLIB
#endif


}

void WriteUnicodeLineW(const std::wstring& ws)
{

#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
    WriteConsole(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), ws.c_str(), static_cast<DWORD>(ws.length()), nullptr, nullptr);
    std::cout << std::endl;
#elif defined LINUXLIB
    std::cout << String::Strings::WidestringToString(ws)<<std::endl;
#elif defined MACOSLIB
#endif


}

void WriteUnicodeW(const std::wstring& ws)
{

#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
    WriteConsole(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), ws.c_str(), static_cast<DWORD>(ws.length()), nullptr, nullptr);
#elif defined LINUXLIB
    std::cout << String::Strings::WidestringToString(ws);
#elif defined MACOSLIB
#endif

}

Windows Code. Using WriteLineUnicode or WriteUnicode function. Same code can be used for Linux.

std::wstring x = L"\0\001日本ABC\0DE\0F\0G🐶\0"s;
std::string result = WidestringToString(x, "en_US.UTF-8");
WriteLineUnicode(u8"RESULT" + result);
WriteLineUnicode(u8"RESULT_SIZE" + std::to_string(result.size()));

Finally on Windows. You need a powerfull and complete support for unicode chars in console. I recommend ConEmu and set as default terminal on Windows.

Test on Microsoft Visual Studio and Jetbrains Clion.

  • Tested on Microsoft Visual Studio 2017 with VC++; std=c++17. (Windows Project)
  • Tested on Microsoft Visual Studio 2017 with g++; std=c++17. (Linux Project)
  • Tested on Jetbrains Clion 2018.3 with g++; std=c++17. (Linux Toolchain / Remote)

QA

Q. Why you not use <codecvt> header functions and classes?.
A. Deprecate Removed or deprecated features impossible build on VC++, but no problems on g++. I prefer 0 warnings and headaches.

Q. wstring on Windows are interchan.
A. Deprecate Removed or deprecated features impossible build on VC++, but no problems on g++. I prefer 0 warnings and headaches.

Q. std ::wstring is cross platform?
A. No. std::wstring uses wchar_t elements. On Windows wchar_t size is 2 bytes, each character is stored in UTF-16 units, if character is bigger than U+FFFF, the character is represented in two UTF-16 units(2 wchar_t elements) called surrogate pairs. On Linux wchar_t size is 4 bytes each character is stored in one wchar_t element, no needed surrogate pairs. Check Standard data types on UNIX, Linux, and Windows.

Q. std ::string is cross platform?
A. Yes. std::string uses char elements. char type is guaranted that is same byte size in all compilers. char type size is 1 byte. Check Standard data types on UNIX, Linux, and Windows.

-1

I had a similar problem, Output Unicode to console Using C++, in Windows contains the gem that you need to do chcp 65001 in the console before running your program.

There may be some way of doing this programatically, but I don't know what it is.

  • This was already discussed a few times, does not help it. – Andrew Feb 20 '11 at 2:33
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Correctly displaying Western European characters in the windows console

Long story short:

  1. use chcp to find which codepage works for you. In my case it was chcp 28591 for Western Europe.
  2. optionally make it the default: REG ADD HKCU\Console /v CodePage /t REG_DWORD /d 28591

History of the discovery

I had a similar problem, with Java. It is just cosmetic, since it involves log lines sent to the console; but it is still annoying.

The output from our Java application is supposed to be in UTF-8 and it displays correctly in eclipse's console. But in windows console, it just shows the ASCII box-drawing characters: Inicializaci├│n and art├¡culos instead of Inicialización and artículos.

I stumbled upon a related question and mixed some of the answers to get to the solution that worked for me. The solution is changing the codepage used by the console and using a font that supports UNICODE (like consolas or lucida console). The font you can select in the system menu of the Windows cosole:

  1. Start a console by any one of
    • Win + R then type cmd and hit the Return key.
    • Hit the Win key and type cmd followed by the return key.
  2. Open the system menu by any one of
    • click the upper left corner icon
    • Hit the Alt + Space key combination
  3. then select "Default" to change the behavior of all subsequent console windows
  4. click the "Font" tab
  5. Select Consolas or Lucida console
  6. Click OK

Regarding the codepage, for a one-off case, you can get it done with the command chcp and then you have to investigate which codepage is correct for your set of characters. Several answers suggested UTF-8 codepage, which is 65001, but that codepage didn't work for my Spanish characters.

Another answer suggested a batch script to interactively selecting the codepage you wanted from a list. There I found the codepage for ISO-8859-1 I needed: 28591. So you could execute

chcp 28591

before each execution of your application. You might check which code page is right for you in the Code Page Identifiers MSDN page.

Yet another answer indicated how to persist the selected codepage as the default for your windows console. It involves changing the registry, so consider yourself warned that you might brick your machine by using this solution.

REG ADD HKCU\Console /v CodePage /t REG_DWORD /d 28591

This creates the CodePage value with the 28591 data inside the HKCU\Console registry key. And that did work for me.

Please note that HKCU ("HKEY_CURRENT_USER") is only for the current user. If you want to change it for all users in that computer, you'll need to use the regedit utility and find/create the corresponding Console key (probably you'll have to create a Console key inside HKEY_USERS\.DEFAULT)

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