I'm a fan of extension methods in C#, but haven't had any success adding an extension method to a static class, such as Console.

For example, if I want to add an extension to Console, called 'WriteBlueLine', so that I can go:

Console.WriteBlueLine("This text is blue");

I tried this by adding a local, public static method, with Console as a 'this' parameter... but no dice!

public static class Helpers {
    public static void WriteBlueLine(this Console c, string text)
    {
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
        Console.WriteLine(text);
        Console.ResetColor();
    }
}

This didn't add a 'WriteBlueLine' method to Console... am I doing it wrong? Or asking for the impossible?

  • 3
    Oh well. unfortunate but I think I'll get by. I'm STILL an extension method virgin (in production code anyway). Maybe one day, if i'm lucky. – Andy McCluggage Nov 21 '08 at 17:25
  • I've written a number of HtmlHelper extensions for ASP.NET MVC. Wrote one for DateTime to give me the end of the given date (23:59.59). Helpful when you ask the user to specify an end date, but really want it to be the end of that day. – tvanfosson Nov 21 '08 at 18:25
  • 12
    There's no way to add them currently because the feature doesn't exist in C#. Not because it's impossible per se, but because the C# peeps are very busy, were mostly interested in extension methods to make LINQ work and didn't see enough benefit in static extension methods to justify the time they would take to implement. Eric Lippert explains here. – Jordan Gray Oct 31 '12 at 9:54
  • 4
    Obviously quite a number of people want this feature even though it's not currently possible. You can vote at UserVoice for the feature to be implemented. – kjbartel Jul 10 '14 at 1:17
  • 1
    Just call Helpers.WriteBlueLine(null, "Hi"); :) – Hüseyin Yağlı Jul 24 '16 at 14:32

15 Answers 15

up vote 243 down vote accepted

No. Extension methods require an instance variable (value) for an object. You can however, write a static wrapper around the ConfigurationManager interface. If you implement the wrapper, you don't need an extension method since you can just add the method directly.

 public static class ConfigurationManagerWrapper
 {
      public static ConfigurationSection GetSection( string name )
      {
         return ConfigurationManager.GetSection( name );
      }

      .....

      public static ConfigurationSection GetWidgetSection()
      {
          return GetSection( "widgets" );
      }
 }
  • 8
    @Luis -- in context, the idea would be "could I add an extension method to the ConfigurationManager class to get a specific section?" You can't add an extension method to a static class since it requires an instance of the object, but you can write a wrapper class (or facade) that implements the same signature and defers the actual call to the real ConfigurationManager. You can add whatever method you want to the wrapper class so it doesn't need to be an extension. – tvanfosson Feb 18 '10 at 18:35
  • I find it more helpful to just add a static method to the class implementing ConfigurationSection. So given an implementation called MyConfigurationSection, I would call MyConfigurationSection.GetSection(), which returns the section already typed, or null if it does not exist. End result is the same, but it avoids adding a class. – tap Oct 8 '10 at 18:13
  • 1
    @tap - it's only an example, and the first one that came to mind. The single responsibility principle comes into play, though. Should the "container" actually be responsible for interpreting itself from the configuration file? Normally I simply have ConfigurationSectionHandler and cast the output from ConfigurationManager to the appropriate class and don't bother with the wrapper. – tvanfosson Oct 8 '10 at 18:29
  • 4
    For in-house use, I started creating 'X' variants of static classes and structures for adding custom Extensions: 'ConsoleX' contains new static methods for 'Console', 'MathX' contains new static methods for 'Math', 'ColorX' extends the 'Color' methods, etc. Not quite the same, but easy to remember and discover in IntelliSense. – user1689175 Sep 26 '14 at 19:11
  • 1
    @Xtro I agree it's awful, but not worse than not being able to use a test double in it's place or, worse, give up on testing your code because static classes make it so difficult. Microsoft seems to agree with me because it's the reason they introduced the HttpContextWrapper/HttpContextBase classes to get around the static HttpContext.Current for MVC. – tvanfosson Jun 5 '17 at 13:54

Can you add static extensions to classes in C#? No but you can do this:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static T Create<T>(this T @this)
        where T : class, new()
    {
        return Utility<T>.Create();
    }
}

public static class Utility<T>
    where T : class, new()
{
    static Utility()
    {
        Create = Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.New(typeof(T).GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes))).Compile();
    }
    public static Func<T> Create { get; private set; }
}

Here's how it works. While you can't technically write static extension methods, instead this code exploits a loophole in extension methods. That loophole being that you can call extension methods on null objects without getting the null exception (unless you access anything via @this).

So here's how you would use this:

    var ds1 = (null as DataSet).Create(); // as oppose to DataSet.Create()
    // or
    DataSet ds2 = null;
    ds2 = ds2.Create();

    // using some of the techniques above you could have this:
    (null as Console).WriteBlueLine(...); // as oppose to Console.WriteBlueLine(...)

Now WHY did I pick calling the default constructor as an example, and AND why don't I just return new T() in the first code snippet without doing all of that Expression garbage? Well todays your lucky day because you get a 2fer. As any advanced .NET developer knows, new T() is slow because it generates a call to System.Activator which uses reflection to get the default constructor before calling it. Damn you Microsoft! However my code calls the default constructor of the object directly.

Static extensions would be better than this but desperate times call for desperate measures.

  • 2
    I think for Dataset this trick will work, but I doubt that it works for Console class as Console is static class, static types cannot be used as arguments :) – ThomasBecker Apr 28 '15 at 13:55
  • Yeah, I was going to say the same thing. This is pseudo-static extension methods on a non-static class. The OP was an extension method on a static class. – MarqueIV Sep 27 '15 at 9:14
  • 2
    It's much better and easier to just have some naming convention for such methods like XConsole, ConsoleHelper and so on. – Alex Zhukovskiy Jan 11 '17 at 10:15
  • 2
    This is a fascinating trick, but the result is smelly. You create a null object, then appear to call a method on it - despite years of being told that "calling a method on a null object causes an exception". It works, but ..ugh... Confusing to anyone maintaining later. I won't downvote, because you have added to the pool of information as to what is possible. But I sincerely hope no one ever uses this technique!! Additional complaint: Don't pass one of these to a method, and expect to get OO subclassing: method called will be type of parameter declaration not type of parameter passed in. – ToolmakerSteve Jan 24 at 20:16
  • This is tricky, but I like it. One alternative to (null as DataSet).Create(); could be default(DataSet).Create();. – Bagerfahrer Apr 27 at 8:25

Its not possible.

And yes I think MS made a mistake here.

Their decision does not make sense and forces programmers to write (as described above) a pointless wrapper class.

Here is a good example: Trying to extend static MS Unit testing class Assert: I want 1 more Assert method AreEqual(x1,x2).

The only way to do this is to point to different classes or write a wrapper around 100s of different Assert methods. Why!?

If the decision was been made to allow extensions of instances I see no logical reason to not allow static extensions. The arguments about sectioning libraries does not stand up once instances can be extended.

Maybe you could add a static class with your custom namespace and the same class name:

using CLRConsole = System.Console;

namespace ExtensionMethodsDemo
{
    public static class Console
    {
        public static void WriteLine(string value)
        {
            CLRConsole.WriteLine(value);
        }

        public static void WriteBlueLine(string value)
        {
            System.ConsoleColor currentColor = CLRConsole.ForegroundColor;

            CLRConsole.ForegroundColor = System.ConsoleColor.Blue;
            CLRConsole.WriteLine(value);

            CLRConsole.ForegroundColor = currentColor;
        }

        public static System.ConsoleKeyInfo ReadKey(bool intercept)
        {
            return CLRConsole.ReadKey(intercept);
        }
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                Console.WriteBlueLine("This text is blue");   
            }
            catch (System.Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
                Console.WriteLine(ex.StackTrace);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to continue...");
            Console.ReadKey(true);
        }
    }
}
  • But this doesn’t solve the problem of needing to reimplement every single method from the original static class that you want to keep in your wrapper. It’s still a wrapper, though it does have the merit of needing fewer changes in the code that uses it… – binki Dec 19 '14 at 15:49

I stumbled up on this thread while trying to find an answer to the same question the OP had. I didn't find the answer I wanted but I ended up doing this.

public static class MyConsole
{
    public static void WriteLine(this ConsoleColor Color, string Text)
    {
        Console.ForegroundColor = Color;
        Console.WriteLine(Text);   
    }
}

And I use it like this:

ConsoleColor.Cyan.WriteLine("voilà");

Nope. Extension method definitions require an instance of the type you're extending. Its unfortunate; I'm not sure why its required...

  • 4
    It is because an extension method is used to extend an instance of an object. If they didn't do that they would just be regular static methods. – Derek Ekins Jun 6 '09 at 17:15
  • 23
    It'd be nice to do both, wouldn't it? – Will Jun 8 '09 at 13:29

As for extension methods, extension methods themselves are static; but they are invoked as if they are instance methods. Since a static class is not instantiable, you would never have an instance of the class to invoke an extension method from. For this reason the compiler does not allow extension methods to be defined for static classes.

Mr. Obnoxious wrote: "As any advanced .NET developer knows, new T() is slow because it generates a call to System.Activator which uses reflection to get the default constructor before calling it".

New() is compiled to the IL "newobj" instruction if the type is known at compile time. Newobj takes a constructor for direct invocation. Calls to System.Activator.CreateInstance() compile to the IL "call" instruction to invoke System.Activator.CreateInstance(). New() when used against generic types will result in a call to System.Activator.CreateInstance(). The post by Mr. Obnoxious was unclear on this point... and well, obnoxious.

This code:

System.Collections.ArrayList _al = new System.Collections.ArrayList();
System.Collections.ArrayList _al2 = (System.Collections.ArrayList)System.Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(System.Collections.ArrayList));

produces this IL:

  .locals init ([0] class [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList _al,
           [1] class [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList _al2)
  IL_0001:  newobj     instance void [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList::.ctor()
  IL_0006:  stloc.0
  IL_0007:  ldtoken    [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList
  IL_000c:  call       class [mscorlib]System.Type [mscorlib]System.Type::GetTypeFromHandle(valuetype [mscorlib]System.RuntimeTypeHandle)
  IL_0011:  call       object [mscorlib]System.Activator::CreateInstance(class [mscorlib]System.Type)
  IL_0016:  castclass  [mscorlib]System.Collections.ArrayList
  IL_001b:  stloc.1

You can't add static methods to a type. You can only add (pseudo-)instance methods to an instance of a type.

The point of the this modifier is to tell the C# compiler to pass the instance on the left-side of the . as the first parameter of the static/extension method.

In the case of adding static methods to a type, there is no instance to pass for the first parameter.

As of C#7 this isn't supported. There are however discussions about integrating something like that in C#8 and proposals worth supporting.

I tried to do this with System.Environment back when I was learning extension methods and was not successful. The reason is, as others mention, because extension methods require an instance of the class.

yes, in a limited sense.

public class DataSet : System.Data.DataSet
{
    public static void SpecialMethod() { }
}

This works but Console doesn't because it's static.

public static class Console
{       
    public static void WriteLine(String x)
    { System.Console.WriteLine(x); }

    public static void WriteBlueLine(String x)
    {
        System.Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
        System.Console.Write(.x);           
    }
}

This works because as long as it's not on the same namespace. The problem is that you have to write a proxy static method for every method that System.Console have. It's not necessarily a bad thing as you can add something like this:

    public static void WriteLine(String x)
    { System.Console.WriteLine(x.Replace("Fck","****")); }

or

 public static void WriteLine(String x)
    {
        System.Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
        System.Console.WriteLine(x); 
    }

The way it works is that you hook something into the standard WriteLine. It could be a line count or bad word filter or whatever. Whenever you just specify Console in your namespace say WebProject1 and import the namespace System, WebProject1.Console will be chosen over System.Console as default for those classes in namespace WebProject1. So this code will turn all the Console.WriteLine calls into blue insofar as you never specified System.Console.WriteLine.

  • unfortunately the approach of using a descendant doen't work when the base class is sealed (like many in the .NET class library) – George Birbilis Nov 28 '15 at 21:28

The following was rejected as an edit to tvanfosson's answer. I was asked to contribute it as my own answer. I used his suggestion and finished the implementation of a ConfigurationManager wrapper. In principle I simply filled out the ... in tvanfosson's answer.

No. Extension methods require an instance of an object. You can however, write a static wrapper around the ConfigurationManager interface. If you implement the wrapper, you don't need an extension method since you can just add the method directly.

public static class ConfigurationManagerWrapper
{
    public static NameValueCollection AppSettings
    {
        get { return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings; }
    }

    public static ConnectionStringSettingsCollection ConnectionStrings
    {
        get { return ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings; }
    }

    public static object GetSection(string sectionName)
    {
        return ConfigurationManager.GetSection(sectionName);
    }

    public static Configuration OpenExeConfiguration(string exePath)
    {
        return ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(exePath);
    }

    public static Configuration OpenMachineConfiguration()
    {
        return ConfigurationManager.OpenMachineConfiguration();
    }

    public static Configuration OpenMappedExeConfiguration(ExeConfigurationFileMap fileMap, ConfigurationUserLevel userLevel)
    {
        return ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedExeConfiguration(fileMap, userLevel);
    }

    public static Configuration OpenMappedMachineConfiguration(ConfigurationFileMap fileMap)
    {
        return ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedMachineConfiguration(fileMap);
    }

    public static void RefreshSection(string sectionName)
    {
        ConfigurationManager.RefreshSection(sectionName);
    }
}

You can use a cast on null to make it work.

public static class YoutTypeExtensionExample
{
    public static void Example()
    {
        ((YourType)null).ExtensionMethod();
    }
}

The extension:

public static class YourTypeExtension
{
    public static void ExtensionMethod(this YourType x) { }
}

YourType:

public class YourType { }

It is not possible to write an extension method, however it is possible to mimic the behaviour you are asking for.

using FooConsole = System.Console;

public static class Console
{
    public static void WriteBlueLine(string text)
    {
        FooConsole.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
        FooConsole.WriteLine(text);
        FooConsole.ResetColor();
    }
}

This will allow you to call Console.WriteBlueLine(fooText) in other classes. If the other classes want access to the other static functions of Console, they will have to be explicitly referenced through their namespace.

You can always add all of the methods in to the replacement class if you want to have all of them in one place.

So you would have something like

using FooConsole = System.Console;

public static class Console
{
    public static void WriteBlueLine(string text)
    {
        FooConsole.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
        FooConsole.WriteLine(text);
        FooConsole.ResetColor();
    }
    public static void WriteLine(string text)
    {
        FooConsole.WriteLine(text);
    }
...etc.
}

This would provide the kind of behaviour you are looking for.

*Note Console will have to be added through the namespace that you put it in.

You CAN do this if you are willing to "frig" it a little by making a variable of the static class and assigning it to null. However, this method would not be available to static calls on the class, so not sure how much use it would be:

Console myConsole = null;
myConsole.WriteBlueLine("my blue line");

public static class Helpers {
    public static void WriteBlueLine(this Console c, string text)
    {
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
        Console.WriteLine(text);
        Console.ResetColor();
    }
}
  • this is exactly what I did. My class is called MyTrace :) – Gishu Oct 13 '10 at 11:00
  • Useful tip. bit of a code smell, but I guess we could hide the null object down in a base class or something. Thanks. – Tom Deloford Feb 19 '11 at 12:14
  • 1
    I cant compile this code. Error 'System.Console': static types cannot be used as parameters – Kuncevič Feb 22 '11 at 9:23
  • Yes this cannot be done. Damn I thought you were onto something there! Static types cannot be passed as parameters into methods which makes sense I suppose. Let's just hope that MS see the wood from the trees on this one and change it. – Tom Deloford Feb 24 '11 at 14:48
  • 3
    I should have tried compiling my own code! As Tom says, this won't work with static classes. – Tenaka Feb 25 '11 at 15:33

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