1

Our server has a custom language-switcher for our CSS files. It recognizes certain patterns and switches left & right commands (among other things). To tell it where to switch, we use @RIGHT@ and @LEFT@ wherever needed:

div.somecls {
    margin-@RIGHT@: 15px;

    &:after {
        content: "\f061";
        font-family: FontAwesome;
        position: absolute;
        @LEFT@: 10px;
        top: 20px;
    }
}

This also extends to class names themselves:

.push-@RIGHT@ {
    /* ... */
}

Till now, I wrote a node-script that compiled the css then replaced left and right with the proper replacements. However, I'm wondering - is there's a way to tell LESS to just ignore some things and regard them as normal?

That way I could write @LEFT@ in the LESS file itself instead of overthinking it all (this would allow a lot of flexibility, especially if there are cases where I don't want the language switcher to do anything and rather use left)

  • Is this what you want? You can do it using escaped strings. – Harry Jul 24 '14 at 7:30
  • @Harry holy crap, YES! – yuvi Jul 24 '14 at 8:04
  • @Harry I'd love an explanation how this witchcraft happens (i.e. what that magical tilda is doing) – yuvi Jul 24 '14 at 8:07
3

You can tell LESS to ignore characters like @ by using escaped strings like below:

It is basically like doing var a = "1+2"; in any programming language. It treats it as a string and doesn't perform any extra operations. But in LESS when we just provide "@RIGHT@", it gets printed with the quotes, to avoid the quotes we need to use the tilda character in front.

@right: ~"@RIGHT@";
@left: ~"@LEFT@";

div.somecls {
    margin-@{right}: 15px;

    &:after {
        content: "\f061";
        font-family: FontAwesome;
        position: absolute;
        border-@{left}: 10px;
        top: 20px;
    }
}
div.@{left}{
  color: blue;
}

Demo


Update:

As mentioned in comments, earlier the above method would not work when the property-value pair is like @{left}: 10px. That is, when compiled it would not produce output as @LEFT@: 10px. This issue has now been fixed.

  • 1
    Yay, thank you! – yuvi Jul 24 '14 at 8:10
  • 2
    @yuvi: One small thing note, using the above method the @{left}: 10px alone would not produce @LEFT@: 10px output. Seems like it is a limitation. But we can overcome it by doing a workaround as -inj:~"1; @{left}:"10px;. This would produce -inj: 1; @LEFT@: 10px; but the -inj: 1; has no meaning and hence all browsers would just ignore it. Approach is picked from this thread. – Harry Jul 24 '14 at 8:37
  • 2
    Here's another silly workaround: define @i: ~" "; at the top, then: @{i}@{left}: 10px; results in @LEFT@: 10px; with an added space – yuvi Jul 24 '14 at 9:30
  • 1
    I've opened an issue about the weird behavior. – yuvi Aug 27 '14 at 13:17
  • 1
    update: the issue has been fixed – yuvi Oct 22 '14 at 10:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.