2

Suppose there is a List[A] and two predicates p1: A => Boolean and p2: A => Boolean.
I need to find two elements in the list: the first element a1 satisfying p1 and the first element a2 satisfying p2 (in my case a1 != a2)

Obviously, I can run find twice but I would like to do it in one pass. How would you do it in one pass in Scala ?

  • 4
    I bet the resulting code will be way more obscure than two passes. Just saying. – om-nom-nom Jul 24 '14 at 14:19
  • I guess a tail recursive function will be pretty clear. – Michael Jul 24 '14 at 14:49
  • 1
    The answer is a fold. The answer is always a fold :) I'll add an answer later when my meeting's over but myList.foldLeft((None, None)){ case ((a1, a2), e) => (if (!a1.isDefined && p1(e)) Some(e) else a1,if (!a2.isDefined && p2(e)) Some(e) else a2)} should be close – The Archetypal Paul Jul 24 '14 at 15:57
  • @Paul Thank you, but I am afraid that fold always iterates through the whole list from the beginning to the end, which is suboptimal. We need to return once the first element are found and skip the rest of the list. – Michael Jul 24 '14 at 16:13
  • Ah yes. Back to the drawing board. – The Archetypal Paul Jul 24 '14 at 17:37
1

So, here's an attempt. It's fairly straightforward to generalise it to take a list of predicates (and return a list of elements found)

def find2[A](xs: List[A], p1: A => Boolean, p2: A => Boolean): (Option[A], Option[A]) = {
  def find2helper(xs: List[A], p1: A => Boolean, p2: A => Boolean, soFar: (Option[A], Option[A])): (Option[A], Option[A]) = {
    if (xs == Nil) soFar
    else {
      val a1 = if (soFar._1.isDefined) soFar._1 else if (p1(xs.head)) Some(xs.head) else None
      val a2 = if (soFar._2.isDefined) soFar._2 else if (p2(xs.head)) Some(xs.head) else None
      if (a1.isDefined && a2.isDefined) (a1, a2) else find2helper(xs.tail, p1, p2, (a1, a2))
    }
  }
  find2helper(xs, p1, p2, (None, None))

 } //> find2: [A](xs: List[A], p1: A => Boolean, p2: A => Boolean)(Option[A], Option[A])

  val foo = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) //> foo  : List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

  find2[Int](foo, { x: Int => x > 2 }, { x: Int => x % 2 == 0 })
  //> res0: (Option[Int], Option[Int]) = (Some(3),Some(2))
  find2[Int](foo, { x: Int => x > 2 }, { x: Int => x % 7 == 0 })
  //> res1: (Option[Int], Option[Int]) = (Some(3),None)
  find2[Int](foo, { x: Int => x > 7 }, { x: Int => x % 2 == 0 })
  //> res2: (Option[Int], Option[Int]) = (None,Some(2))
  find2[Int](foo, { x: Int => x > 7 }, { x: Int => x % 7 == 0 })
  //> res3: (Option[Int], Option[Int]) = (None,None)

Generalised version (which is actually slightly clearer, I think)

def findN[A](xs: List[A], ps: List[A => Boolean]): List[Option[A]] = {
  def findNhelper(xs: List[A], ps: List[A => Boolean], soFar: List[Option[A]]): List[Option[A]] = {
    if (xs == Nil) soFar
    else {
      val as = ps.zip(soFar).map {
          case (p, e) => if (e.isDefined) e else if (p(xs.head)) Some(xs.head) else None
      }
      if (as.forall(_.isDefined)) as else findNhelper(xs.tail, ps, as)
    }
  }
  findNhelper(xs, ps, List.fill(ps.length)(None))

} //> findN: [A](xs: List[A], ps: List[A => Boolean])List[Option[A]]

val foo = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) //> foo  : List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

findN[Int](foo, List({ x: Int => x > 2 }, { x: Int => x % 2 == 0 }))
//> res0: List[Option[Int]] = List(Some(3), Some(2))
findN[Int](foo, List({ x: Int => x > 2 }, { x: Int => x % 7 == 0 }))
//> res1: List[Option[Int]] = List(Some(3), None)
findN[Int](foo, List({ x: Int => x > 7 }, { x: Int => x % 2 == 0 }))
//> res2: List[Option[Int]] = List(None, Some(2))
findN[Int](foo, List({ x: Int => x > 7 }, { x: Int => x % 7 == 0 }))
//> res3: List[Option[Int]] = List(None, None)
1
scala> val l = List(1,2,3)
l: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)

scala> val p1 = {x:Int =>  x % 2 == 0}
p1: Int => Boolean = <function1>

scala> val p2 = {x:Int =>  x % 3 == 0}
p2: Int => Boolean = <function1>

scala> val pp = {x:Int => p1(x) || p2(x) }
pp: Int => Boolean = <function1>

scala> l.find(pp)
res2: Option[Int] = Some(2)

scala> l.filter(pp)
res3: List[Int] = List(2, 3)
  • Thank you. However I don't know which element of the filtered list (List(2, 3) in your example) satisfies p1 and which one satisfies p2. – Michael Jul 24 '14 at 14:46
1

Does this work for you?

def predFilter[A](lst: List[A], p1: A => Boolean, p2: A => Boolean): List[A] =
  lst.filter(x => p1(x) || p2(x)) // or p1(x) && p2(x) depending on your need

This will return you a new list that matches either of the predicates.

val a = List(1,2,3,4,5)
val b = predFilter[Int](a, _ % 2 == 0, _ % 3 == 0) // b is now List(2, 3, 4)
  • Shouldn't it be p1(x) || p2(x) ? – Ashalynd Jul 24 '14 at 14:39
  • @Ashalynd that depends on the use, when I used || _ > 2 and _ < 5 matched for the entire list, because ALL the elements are less than 5 except for 5, and 5 is matched by the "greater than two" – Electric Coffee Jul 24 '14 at 14:41
  • The OP was talking about satisfying either of the predicates. – Ashalynd Jul 24 '14 at 14:41
  • @Ashalynd in which case you're right, it should be || – Electric Coffee Jul 24 '14 at 14:43

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