35

I have a code similar to this:

class AClass {
public:
  struct AStruct { };

  AClass(){}

private:
  const AStruct m_struct;
};

int main() {
  AClass a;
}

It throws this compilation error (with Clang LLVM version 5.1):

error: constructor for 'AClass' must explicitly initialize 
       the const member 'm_struct'

If I specify a C++11 default constructor for struct AStruct, I get the same error:

  struct AStruct {
    AStruct() = default;
  };

However, this is solved by writing a constructor with an empty body:

  struct AStruct {
    AStruct(){}  // fixed
  };

Why do I need to specify an empty constructor? Isn't it automatically created with public access for structs?

Why does not the C++11 default constructor solve the problem?

3

2 Answers 2

27

From §8.5 [dcl.init]/7:

If a program calls for the default initialization of an object of a const-qualified type T, T shall be a class type with a user-provided default constructor.

The default constructor of AClass default-initializes the const member (see below), so that member must have a user-provided default constructor. Using = default does not result in a user-provided default constructor, as can be seen in §8.4.2 [dcl.fct.def.default]/4:

A function is user-provided if it is user-declared and not explicitly defaulted or deleted on its first declaration.


The member is default-initialized per §12.6.2 [class.base.init]/8:

In a non-delegating constructor, if a given non-static data member or base class is not designated by a mem-initializer-id (including the case where there is no mem-initializer-list because the constructor has no ctor-initializer) and the entity is not a virtual base class of an abstract class (10.4), then

— if the entity is a non-static data member that has a brace-or-equal-initializer , the entity is initialized as specified in 8.5;
— otherwise, if the entity is an anonymous union or a variant member (9.5), no initialization is performed;
otherwise, the entity is default-initialized (8.5).

5
  • @chris I use G++-4.8. There is no error. And I can even call a const method of struct A with no error. So, is this problem clang specific?
    – Peng Zhang
    Jul 24, 2014 at 21:08
  • 3
    Even worse this code actually does something (and useful), yet we get a compiler error. @PengZhang G++4.8 is violating the standard here, not clang. Jul 24, 2014 at 21:09
  • 3
    @Casey Wrong issue number.
    – T.C.
    Jul 25, 2014 at 5:22
  • @chris, To lend more weight to the quirk, if the =default is defined outside the class declaration, then that is seen as a user defined constructor, and compiles (8.4.2/5) in the sample, a fails, b compiles
    – Niall
    Jul 25, 2014 at 6:24
  • @Niall, I actually took care of that one :) A function is user-provided if it is user-declared and not explicitly defaulted or deleted on its first declaration.
    – chris
    Jul 25, 2014 at 12:22
19

Stolen from @chris's answer we have this paragraph: §8.5 [dcl.init]/7:

If a program calls for the default initialization of an object of a const-qualified type T, T shall be a class type with a user-provided default constructor.

We can then construct a completely ridiculous case that illustrates this restriction:

struct Foo {};
int main() {
  const Foo f;
}

which fails to compile in clang, as the standard dictates. Your code is simply this, but as a member variable of another class/struct.

We can even do this:

struct Foo {int x = 3;};
int main() {
  const Foo f;
}

where all the data is obviously initialized. This last example convinces me that this is a defect in the standard.

The thought was probably something to do with POD types being uninitialized and const, but the wording blocks code that is unrelated. Default constructors in modern C++ are often more than good enough, and forcing Foo(){} is poor form.

0

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