0

(Sorry if my sentances are full of mystakes, I'll do my best to write something readable) Hi, I'm working on a function that reads a file and store every line whose first char is ":" and removes every dash contained in the string. Every time this kind of line is found, push_back() is used to store this line in a vector. The problem is that, every time push_back() is used, all the elements in the vector takes the value of the last one. I don't understand why does it happen. Here's the code :

 string listContent;
 size_t dashPos;
 vector<char*>cTagsList;
 while(!SFHlist.eof())
 {
    getline(SFHlist,listContent);
    if(listContent[0]==':')
    {
        listContent.erase(0,1);
        dashPos = listContent.rfind("-",string::npos);
        while(dashPos!=string::npos)
        {
            listContent.pop_back();
            dashPos = listContent.rfind("-",string::npos);
        }
        char* c_listContent = (char*)listContent.c_str();
        cTagsList.push_back(c_listContent);
    }
 }

I first thought it was a problem with the end of the file but aborting the searching process before reaching this point gives the same results.

  • 2
    First of all, while (!eof()) is wrong. Second, casting the result of c_str to char * is very bad. Third, that pointer is invalid as soon as you modify the string, which happens right after. Use a vector of std::string. Anyway, you're not removing every dash, you're removing everything after and including the first dash. Use std::remove and pair it with erase. – chris Jul 25 '14 at 12:24
  • 3
    Do not store the results of c_str! Instead, just make std::vector<std::string> cTagsList; instead and just cTagsList.push_back(listContent); – crashmstr Jul 25 '14 at 12:26
  • use char* only when dealing with pure c, you have strings in c++ – user3477273 Jul 25 '14 at 12:26
  • besides other comments, don't use char*, use std::string and you don't have to think too much – codekiddy Jul 25 '14 at 12:27
  • Well, thanks for the help. As i need a char array (because of ncurses in fact) i think i'll use a vector of string and then convert it to char, this should do the trick – Faeralis Jul 25 '14 at 12:34
2

the c_str()-method of std::string states:

The pointer returned may be invalidated by further calls to other member functions that modify the object.

If you're allowed to use a std::vector< std::string > instead of the vector of char*, you're fine since there would be always a copy of the std::string listContent pushed into the vector, ie.

std::string listContent;
 size_t dashPos;
 std::vector<std::string>cTagsList;
 while(!SFHlist.eof())
 {
    getline(SFHlist,listContent);
    if(listContent[0]==':')
    {
        listContent.erase(0,1);
        dashPos = listContent.rfind("-",string::npos);
        while(dashPos!=string::npos)
        {
            listContent.pop_back();
            dashPos = listContent.rfind("-",string::npos);
        }
        cTagsList.push_back(listContent);
    }
 }

(I haven't tested it)

  • As i replied to the first post, i need a char, but i'll try to get it by converting a std::vector<std::string> to a char, thanks for the help – Faeralis Jul 25 '14 at 12:41
  • @Faeralis blade already pointed out the [] operator of std::string which provides random access to every character in the string and what you can do alternatively is to use .c_str() as you did before, but on the strings already stored in the vector – wonko realtime Jul 25 '14 at 15:09
  • That's what i tried and i worked. – Faeralis Jul 25 '14 at 19:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.