1765

What is the difference between the COPY and ADD commands in a Dockerfile, and when would I use one over the other?

COPY <src> <dest>

The COPY instruction will copy new files from <src> and add them to the container's filesystem at path <dest>

ADD <src> <dest>

The ADD instruction will copy new files from <src> and add them to the container's filesystem at path <dest>.

  • 7
    See best practices: docs.docker.com/engine/userguide/eng-image/… – EricSonaron Jul 1 '17 at 8:28
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    As at June 2018 the reference says that ADD adds to the image (i.e a static file) whereas COPY adds to the container (i.e. a runtime instance of the image). Surely this implies that COPY is executed each time the image is Docker run'd, or maybe this is simply a case of inconsistent terminology? – Chris Robinson Jun 5 '18 at 13:24
  • 9
    I think that's inconsistent terminology – Daniel Stevens Jun 11 '18 at 23:58

11 Answers 11

1759

You should check the ADD and COPY documentation for an exhaustive description of their behaviours, but in a nutshell the major difference is that ADD can do more than COPY:

  • ADD allows <src> to be a URL
  • If the <src> parameter of ADD is an archive in a recognised compression format, it will be unpacked

Note that the Best practices for writing Dockerfiles suggests using COPY where the magic of ADD is not required. Otherwise you (since you had to lookup this answer) are likely to get surprised someday when you mean to copy keep_this_archive_intact.tar.gz into your container, but instead you spray the contents onto your filesystem.

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    Just wanted to clarify something: using ADD with an url to a .tar.gz DOES NOT EXTRACT the archive to the filesystem (I double checked right now to be sure and it's confirmed) – Cecile Oct 19 '18 at 15:19
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    This is essential information and it's a crime that the official Dockerfile reference doesn't clarify the difference this way. – Cheeso Feb 14 at 20:59
363

COPY is

Same as 'ADD', but without the tar and remote URL handling.

Reference straight from the source code.

  • 5
    Do I see this correctly: ADD also creates non-existing directories. So, although it is somehow discouraged in this whole thread, It has an advantage over COPY because you don't have to run mkdir and save some typing – eli Jan 16 at 8:08
  • 1
    How obvious! The source code is the documentation, after all. </snark> – Cheeso Feb 14 at 21:00
121

There is some official documentation on that point: Best Practices for Writing Dockerfiles

Because image size matters, using ADD to fetch packages from remote URLs is strongly discouraged; you should use curl or wget instead. That way you can delete the files you no longer need after they've been extracted and you won't have to add another layer in your image.

RUN mkdir -p /usr/src/things \
  && curl -SL http://example.com/big.tar.gz \
    | tar -xJC /usr/src/things \
  && make -C /usr/src/things all

For other items (files, directories) that do not require ADD’s tar auto-extraction capability, you should always use COPY.

99

From Docker docs:

ADD or COPY

Although ADD and COPY are functionally similar, generally speaking, COPY is preferred. That’s because it’s more transparent than ADD. COPY only supports the basic copying of local files into the container, while ADD has some features (like local-only tar extraction and remote URL support) that are not immediately obvious. Consequently, the best use for ADD is local tar file auto-extraction into the image, as in ADD rootfs.tar.xz /.

More: Best practices for writing Dockerfiles

32

If you want to add a xx.tar.gz to a /usr/local in container, unzip it, and then remove the useless compressed package.

For COPY:

COPY resources/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz /tmp/
RUN tar -zxvf /tmp/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz -C /usr/local
RUN rm /tmp/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz

For ADD:

ADD resources/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz /usr/local/

ADD supports local-only tar extraction. Besides it, COPY will use three layers, but ADD only uses one layer.

  • 2
    Any reason why not just two layers? RUN tar -zxvf /tmp/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz -C /usr/local && rm /tmp/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz – Stephen C Sep 14 '17 at 22:20
11

From Docker docs: https://docs.docker.com/engine/userguide/eng-image/dockerfile_best-practices/#add-or-copy

"Although ADD and COPY are functionally similar, generally speaking, COPY is preferred. That’s because it’s more transparent than ADD. COPY only supports the basic copying of local files into the container, while ADD has some features (like local-only tar extraction and remote URL support) that are not immediately obvious. Consequently, the best use for ADD is local tar file auto-extraction into the image, as in ADD rootfs.tar.xz /.

If you have multiple Dockerfile steps that use different files from your context, COPY them individually, rather than all at once. This will ensure that each step’s build cache is only invalidated (forcing the step to be re-run) if the specifically required files change.

For example:

 COPY requirements.txt /tmp/
 RUN pip install --requirement /tmp/requirements.txt
 COPY . /tmp/

Results in fewer cache invalidations for the RUN step, than if you put the COPY . /tmp/ before it.

Because image size matters, using ADD to fetch packages from remote URLs is strongly discouraged; you should use curl or wget instead. That way you can delete the files you no longer need after they’ve been extracted and you won’t have to add another layer in your image. For example, you should avoid doing things like:

 ADD http://example.com/big.tar.xz /usr/src/things/
 RUN tar -xJf /usr/src/things/big.tar.xz -C /usr/src/things
 RUN make -C /usr/src/things all

And instead, do something like:

 RUN mkdir -p /usr/src/things \
     && curl -SL htt,p://example.com/big.tar.xz \
     | tar -xJC /usr/src/things \
     && make -C /usr/src/things all

For other items (files, directories) that do not require ADD’s tar auto-extraction capability, you should always use COPY."

4

COPY copies a file/directory from your host to your image.

ADD copies a file/directory from your host to your image, but can also fetch remote URLs, extract TAR files, etc...

Use COPY for simply copying files and/or directories into the build context.

Use ADD for downloading remote resources, extracting TAR files, etc..

2

COPY

This copies one or many local files or folders into the destination within your Docker image.

COPY < src> < dest >

COPY ["< source >",... "< destination >"] 

(this form is required for paths containing whitespace)

An example Dockerfile that uses COPY This is how you would use COPY in a Dockerfile for a Ruby app.

FROM ruby:2.5.1
WORKDIR /usr/src/app
COPY Gemfile Gemfile.lock ./
RUN bundle install
COPY . .
CMD ["./your-daemon-or-script.rb"]

It builds up the image in layers, starting with the parent image ruby:2.5.1, defined using FROM.

The Docker instruction WORKDIR defines a working directory for the COPY or ADD instructions that follow it.

By copying the Gemfiles followed by RUN bundle install, an image layer is created with the installed Ruby Gems, which can be cached. The last two Docker instructions copy the app’s files into the image and set the default command using CMD.

This means if you change any of the app’s files, you can rebuild the Docker image using the cached parent and intermediate layers. This is much more efficient than building all of them from scratch.

ADD

This instruction has similar syntax to COPY.

ADD < src> < dest >

ADD ["< source >",... "< destination >"] (this form is required for paths containing whitespace)

As well as copying local files and directories into the destination within the Docker image, it has some additional features:

If <source> is a local tar archive in a recognized compression format, then it is automatically unpacked as a directory into the Docker image. For example: ADD rootfs.tar.xz /

If the <source> is a URL, then it will download and copy the file into the destination within the Docker image. However, Docker discourages using ADD for this purpose.

Dockerfile best practice for copying from a URL

Docker suggests that it is often not efficient to copy from a URL using ADD, and it is best practice to use other strategies to include the required remote files.

Because image size matters, using ADD to fetch packages from remote URLs is strongly discouraged; you should use curl or wget instead. That way you can delete the files you no longer need after they’ve been extracted and you don’t have to add another layer in your image.  — Dockerfile Best Practices

For example, you should avoid doing things like:

ADD http://example.com/big.tar.xz /usr/src/things/
RUN tar -xJf /usr/src/things/big.tar.xz -C /usr/src/things
RUN make -C /usr/src/things all

And instead, do something like:

RUN mkdir -p /usr/src/things \
    && curl -SL http://example.com/big.tar.xz \
    | tar -xJC /usr/src/things \
    && make -C /usr/src/things all

For other items (files, directories) that do not require ADD’s tar auto-extraction capability, you should always use COPY.

1

COPY and ADD are both Dockerfile instructions that serve similar purposes. They let you copy files from a specific location into a Docker image.

COPY takes in a src and destination. It only lets you copy in a local file or directory from your host (the machine building the Docker image) into the Docker image itself.

ADD lets you do that too, but it also supports 2 other sources. First, you can use a URL instead of a local file / directory. Secondly, you can extract a tar file from the source directly into the destination

A valid use case for ADD is when you want to extract a local tar file into a specific directory in your Docker image.

If you’re copying in local files to your Docker image, always use COPY because it’s more explicit.

Reference : https://nickjanetakis.com/blog/docker-tip-2-the-difference-between-copy-and-add-in-a-dockerile

1

Important Note

I had to COPY and untar java package in my docker image. When I compared the docker image size created using ADD it was 180MB bigger than the one created using COPY, tar -xzf *.tar.gz and rm *.tar.gz

This means that although ADD removes the tar file, it is still kept somewhere. And its making the image bigger!!

  • Is this still true for the latest version of Docker? – Navin Oct 10 '17 at 12:26
-1
docker build -t {image name} -v {host directory}:{temp build directory} .

This is another way to copy files into an image. The -v option temporarily creates a volume that us used during the build process.

This is different that other volumes because it mounts a host directory for the build only. Files can be copied using a standard cp command.

Also, like the curl and wget, it can be run in a command stack (runs in a single container) and not multiply the image size. ADD and COPY are not stackable because they run in a standalone container and subsequent commands on those files that execute in additional containers will multiply the image size:

With the options set thus:

-v /opt/mysql-staging:/tvol

The following will execute in one container:

RUN cp -r /tvol/mysql-5.7.15-linux-glibc2.5-x86_64 /u1 && \
    mv /u1/mysql-5.7.15-linux-glibc2.5-x86_64 /u1/mysql && \

    mkdir /u1/mysql/mysql-files && \
    mkdir /u1/mysql/innodb && \
    mkdir /u1/mysql/innodb/libdata && \
    mkdir /u1/mysql/innodb/innologs && \
    mkdir /u1/mysql/tmp && \

    chmod 750 /u1/mysql/mysql-files && \
    chown -R mysql /u1/mysql && \
    chgrp -R mysql /u1/mysql
  • 1
    What docker version are you on where you see that option? It's not documented and doesn't work on my 1.12.1 client. – BMitch Sep 23 '16 at 21:38
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    Actually, this feature has still not been included in the main release, and there are still a lot of discussion on the subject, so we should not expect it before a long time... See bug report for more info: github.com/docker/docker/issues/14080. – jwatkins Dec 20 '16 at 18:43
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    Yeah, there is no such option (checked in the latest version 17.06). This answer is misleading. unknown shorthand flag: 'v' in -v – Kirby Aug 28 '17 at 12:18
  • Misleading comment indeed – Guido van Steen Jul 3 '18 at 12:58

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