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It's not 100 percent clear to me that the Google Analytics UA Numbers are always 6 digits, a dash, and 2 digits as Google often mentions in their documentation. There are frequent counter-examples that use fewer than 6 for the account portion and 1-4 for the profile. All of the examples always show numbers but it's not even clear that they can't be letters.

Does anyone know if Google has published a regex that exactly matches allowable UA Numbers? I'm adding this feature to the admin console of an application I work on and would like to validate the user input.

2 Answers 2

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Perhaps there is no fixed range of digits. 6 digits for the account number would limit Google to 1,000,000 users. I'm sure Google aims higher than that. This Google Analytics FAQ item shows UA-xxxxxxx-y as a sample account number (7 + 1 digits). I would presume that only the UA and dashes are fixed and that the number of digits expands as the number of users and profiles grows. E.g. to allow 4 to 10 digits for the user and 1 to 4 digits for the profile you could use this Perl-style regex:

\bUA-\d{4,10}-\d{1,4}\b

If it has to work with the limited Google Analytics regex syntax try this:

UA-[0-9]+-[0-9]+
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  • Yeah, I said it was 6 because I didn't do a count, just a quick glance. :p I was leaning towards the second regex also but wasn't sure if they did allow letters.
    – Otis
    Mar 23, 2010 at 15:51
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    Carlo in this thread carlorizzante.com/2011/… states that UA-1234567 is still a valid ID. I'd rather be conservative and try not to reject a possibly valid code, so I think I'm going to use: \bUA-\d{4,10}(-\d{1,4})?\b
    – ThisGuy
    Aug 2, 2012 at 19:17
  • Nice, /\bUA-\d{4,10}-\d{1,4}\b/ works admirably for :format in Ruby validators. Thanks! Jan 9, 2013 at 21:05
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As of mid-2021 there are now additional formats, and there may be further formats in the future. There is a pattern which will work for almost all active formats and will likely be honoured for future formats.

/^[A-Z][A-Z0-9]?-[A-Z0-9]{4,10}(?:\-[1-9]\d{0,3})?$/

( stackoverflow regex syntax highlighter doesn't seem to like ^ )

Existing codes include: UA YT MO G DC AW

UA-12345-1 G-J2DV45G DC-JGWWE32 AW-GER322

If you're trying to match a code in a longer string try using the word boundary \b option...

/\b[A-Z][A-Z0-9]?-[A-Z0-9]{4,10}(?:\-[1-9]\d{0,3})?\b/

Explaination (without ^|$|\b additions):

  • Match a single character present in the list below [A-Z]
  • A-Z matches a single character in the range between A (index 65) and Z (index 90) (case sensitive)
  • Match a single character present in the list below [A-Z0-9]
  • ? matches the previous token between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
  • A-Z matches a single character in the range between A (index 65) and Z (index 90) (case sensitive)
  • 0-9 matches a single character in the range between 0 (index 48) and 9 (index 57) (case sensitive)
  • - matches the character - with index 4510 (2D16 or 558) literally (case sensitive)
  • Match a single character present in the list below [A-Z0-9] {4,10} matches the previous token between 4 and 10 times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
  • A-Z matches a single character in the range between A (index 65) and Z (index 90) (case sensitive)
  • 0-9 matches a single character in the range between 0 (index 48) and 9 (index 57) (case sensitive)
  • Non-capturing group (?:-[1-9]\d{0,3})?
  • ? matches the previous token between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
  • \- matches the character - with index 4510 (2D16 or 558) literally (case sensitive)
  • Match a single character present in the list below [1-9] 1-9 matches a single character in the range between 1 (index 49) and 9 (index 57) (case sensitive)
  • \d matches a digit (equivalent to [0-9]) {0,3} matches the previous token between 0 and 3 times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)

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