-4
for(int j=0 ; j<str.length() ; j++) {
    if(char[j]==(a||e||i||o||u))
        count++;
}

I know the result of (a||e||i||o||u) is a Boolean so can't compare but how can we check for multiple character presence?

1
  • 3
    Use String.contains()
    – PM 77-1
    Jul 27, 2014 at 4:02

8 Answers 8

30

This is not doing what you want. Please use a stack switch statement:

for(int j = 0; j < str.length(); j++)
     switch(str.charAt(j)) {
         case 'a':
         case 'e':
         case 'i':
         case 'o':
         case 'u':
             count++;
     }

Or, since I'm a regex enthusiast, here's an approach using regular expressions! :)

Matcher matcher = Pattern.compile("[aeiou]").matcher(str);
while(matcher.find())
    count++;

There was a mistake in this code fixed later on, thanks to user2980077

2
  • 1
    This is the more faster way. By the way, the question is a trifle. Jul 27, 2014 at 5:19
  • @Unihedron Honestly, I wasn't sure if a switch statement jumped to the end without the explicit default: case if it doesn't find a matching case - as a switch is still nothing more than an organized goto. If that's the case, then I guess it didn't fix an error, but at least I indented it to be pretty :D Aug 6, 2014 at 17:32
4

One more for the clever regex department:

count = str.replaceAll("[^aeiou]","").length();
1
  • 1
    @Unihedron Yes, if count could be nonzero before the questioner's code and it was his intent to add to what was already there, += is correct.
    – ajb
    Jul 27, 2014 at 4:24
2

I would recommend to use String.contains() and add every searched char into a String.

private static final String SEARCH = "aeiou";

public static void main(String[] args) {
    char[] chars = new char[]{'a', 'b', 'A'};
    int count = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
        if (SEARCH.contains((chars[i] + "").toLowerCase())) {
            count++;
        }
    }

    System.out.println(count);
}

Output is 2. (Code surely can be optimized)

This has three benefits:

  1. It is much easier to add new chars to look for.

  2. This code is case insensitive. (remove the toLowerCase() method call to make it case sensitive)

  3. You avoid "long" if/else or switch/case blocks.

0
2

If you use the classes you can try with regex or simple String

String s = "aeiouaeiou";//string to count
int count = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {

  //One method
  if ("aeiou".indexOf( s.charAt(i) ) >= 0) {
    count++;
  }

  //Another one
  if (Character.toString( s.charAt(i) ).matches("[aeiou]")) {
    count++;
  }

}
0
0

If I really need to work with a char[] array and not with a String instance, I always use the Character class and regular expressions. If you don't know what regular expressions are you should learn them because they are very useful when working with strings. Also, you can practice at Regexr.

For your example I'd use this:

char[] data = "programming in Java is fun".toCharArray();
int counter = 0;

for(int i = 0; i<data.length; i++){
    if(Character.toString(data[i]).matches("[aeiou]")){
        counter++;
    }
}

System.out.println(counter); // writes: 8

What the if statement does is basically it makes a new String instance containing the current character just to be able to use the methods from the String class. The method boolean matches(String regex) checks whether your string satisfies the conditions given with the regex argument.

0

One more for Java 8:

count = str.chars()
           .filter(c -> c == 'a' || c == 'e' || c == 'i' || c == 'o' || c == 'u' )
           .count();
0

One of the ways to do this in using a List of Character and in could be :

List<Character> vowels = List.of('a','e','i','o','u'); // pverloaded convenience factory method 
for(int j=0 ; j < str.length() ; j++) {
    if(vowels.contains(char[j])) {
        count++;
    }
}
0

Here is a solution using extension methods.

public static class Extensions
{
    public static bool Compare(this char c, params char[] ar)
    {
        foreach (var val in ar)
            if (c == val)
                return true;
        return false;
    }
}
// use:

    public static void Main()
    {
        var ans = 'c'.Compare('w', 's', 'c');
    }

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