The following code throws a java.util.ConcurrentModificationException, as expected:

   public void test(){
      ArrayList<String> myList = new ArrayList<String>();

      myList.add("String 1");
      myList.add("String 2");
      myList.add("String 3");
      myList.add("String 4");
      myList.add("String 5");

      for(String s : myList){
         if (s.equals("String 2")){
            myList.remove(s);
         }
      }
   }

However, the following code does not throw the Exception, while I expect it to be thrown:

   public void test(){
      ArrayList<String> myList = new ArrayList<String>();

      myList.add("String 1");
      myList.add("String 2");
      myList.add("String 3");

      for(String s : myList){
         if (s.equals("String 2")){
            myList.remove(s);
         }
      }
   }

The difference is that the first list contains 5 items, while the second list contains 3. The JVM used is:

java version "1.8.0"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0-b132)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.0-b70, mixed mode)

The question: why does the second piece of code NOT throw the java.util.ConcurrentModificationException?

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The iterator returned from ArrayList.iterator() in the implementation we're apparently both using only checks for structural modification in calls to next(), not in calls to hasNext(). The latter just looks like this (under Java 8):

public boolean hasNext() {
    return cursor != size;
}

So in your second case, the iterator "knows" that it's returned two elements, and that the list only has two elements... so hasNext() just returns false, and we never end up calling next() the third time.

I would view this as an implementation detail - basically the checking not being as strict as it could be. It would be entirely reasonable for hasNext() to perform a check and throw an exception in this case too.

  • 4
    @laune - Whether or not it is an oversight, it is not a "bug" because the implementation is conforming to the spec. Besides the code has been like this since (at least) Java 6. – Stephen C Jul 27 '14 at 12:13
  • 2
    @laune Why wouldn't the ArrayList's javadoc be the spec? It specifies the behavior of ArrayList, including the fact that ConcurrentModificationException isn't reliable. – Colonel Thirty Two Jul 27 '14 at 16:59
  • 1
    @laune: because if hasNext returns true, it will call next, which will detect the error. – Jon Skeet Jul 27 '14 at 19:04
  • 4
    @laune Whether it would be better for hasNext to make an attempt to detect concurrent modification doesn't change the fact that, per the class's specification, this behavior is not a bug. Perhaps the implementer had some performance concerns or just plain felt that the rarity of this scenario justified leaving the check out. Maybe they didn't think of it at all. Who knows? Either way, it's not a bug. – Chris Hayes Jul 27 '14 at 19:29
  • 2
    @laune: Yes, that's exactly my point - that's why it goes undetected, but others don't. If you were asking the more philosophical question of why it's implemented that way, Chris's comment says all I would say. – Jon Skeet Jul 27 '14 at 19:48

Note also the last paragraph of the ArrayList documentation summary:

Fail-fast iterators throw ConcurrentModificationException on a best-effort basis. Therefore, it would be wrong to write a program that depended on this exception for its correctness: the fail-fast behavior of iterators should be used only to detect bugs.

If you're worrying about forcing lists to be read-only, use the Collections.unmodifiableList method, instead of checking for ConcurrentModificationException, which as mentioned above is not guaranteed to be thrown in all relevant cases.

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