67

Say I have a dictionary that looks like this:

dictionary = {'A' : {'a': [1,2,3,4,5],
                     'b': [6,7,8,9,1]},

              'B' : {'a': [2,3,4,5,6],
                     'b': [7,8,9,1,2]}}

and I want a dataframe that looks something like this:

     A   B
     a b a b
  0  1 6 2 7
  1  2 7 3 8
  2  3 8 4 9
  3  4 9 5 1
  4  5 1 6 2

Is there a convenient way to do this? If I try:

In [99]:

DataFrame(dictionary)

Out[99]:
     A               B
a   [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
b   [6, 7, 8, 9, 1] [7, 8, 9, 1, 2]

I get a dataframe where each element is a list. What I need is a multiindex where each level corresponds to the keys in the nested dict and the rows corresponding to each element in the list as shown above. I think I can work a very crude solution but I'm hoping there might be something a bit simpler.

81

Pandas wants the MultiIndex values as tuples, not nested dicts. The simplest thing is to convert your dictionary to the right format before trying to pass it to DataFrame:

>>> reform = {(outerKey, innerKey): values for outerKey, innerDict in dictionary.iteritems() for innerKey, values in innerDict.iteritems()}
>>> reform
{('A', 'a'): [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
 ('A', 'b'): [6, 7, 8, 9, 1],
 ('B', 'a'): [2, 3, 4, 5, 6],
 ('B', 'b'): [7, 8, 9, 1, 2]}
>>> pandas.DataFrame(reform)
   A     B   
   a  b  a  b
0  1  6  2  7
1  2  7  3  8
2  3  8  4  9
3  4  9  5  1
4  5  1  6  2

[5 rows x 4 columns]
14
  • 2
    +1, but this does not work if the length of the dictionary value lists, e.g. 5 in this specific example, do not match. Any ideas how I can tackle this? For instance if reform= ('A', 'a'): [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], ('A', 'b'): [6, 7, 8, 9,]
    – Zhubarb
    Oct 22 '15 at 14:16
  • 1
    @Zhubarb: What do you expect the resulting DataFrame to look like? A DataFrame has to be rectangular; it can't have columns of different lengths.
    – BrenBarn
    Oct 22 '15 at 16:45
  • 1
    The columns are randomly ordered in the dataframe, since the dict is unordered. How can the desired order be enforced, short of using an OrderedDict? Nov 12 '16 at 1:23
  • 8
    above solution only works for python 3.5 and above if .iteritems() is replaced by .items()
    – tsando
    Jul 26 '17 at 17:47
  • 3
    This is great. FYI, this can also be done with pd.DataFrame.from_dict if values is is in the form of "records": [{'a': 1, 'b': 2}, {'a': 3, 'b': 4}, ...]
    – EliadL
    Feb 3 '19 at 9:18
22
dict_of_df = {k: pd.DataFrame(v) for k,v in dictionary.items()}
df = pd.concat(dict_of_df, axis=1)

Note that the order of columns is lost for python < 3.6

1
  • I am having another problem using this method. from yahoofinancials import YahooFinancials tickers = ['AAPL', 'WFC', 'F', 'FB', 'DELL', 'SNE'] yahoo_financials = YahooFinancials(tickers) BB=yahoo_financials.get_key_statistics_data() dict_of_df = {k: pd.DataFrame(v) for k,v in BB.items()} df = pd.concat(dict_of_df, axis=1) ValueError: If using all scalar values, you must pass an index
    – rsc05
    Nov 9 '19 at 12:12
18

This answer is a little late to the game, but...

You're looking for the functionality in .stack:

df = pandas.DataFrame.from_dict(dictionary, orient="index").stack().to_frame()
# to break out the lists into columns
df = pd.DataFrame(df[0].values.tolist(), index=df.index)
2
  • 1
    Thanks! This answer does not require reformatting nested dicts as {(key0, key1): [data0, data_n...]} nor does it fail on pandas v1.x.
    – ralex
    Jul 22 '20 at 5:24
  • 1
    This is great. Works on data that is missing keys, too. Oct 19 '20 at 22:56
2

If lists in the dictionary are not of the same lenght, you can adapte the method of BrenBarn.

>>> dictionary = {'A' : {'a': [1,2,3,4,5],
                         'b': [6,7,8,9,1]},
                 'B' : {'a': [2,3,4,5,6],
                        'b': [7,8,9,1]}}

>>> reform = {(outerKey, innerKey): values for outerKey, innerDict in dictionary.items() for innerKey, values in innerDict.items()}
>>> reform
 {('A', 'a'): [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
  ('A', 'b'): [6, 7, 8, 9, 1],
  ('B', 'a'): [2, 3, 4, 5, 6],
  ('B', 'b'): [7, 8, 9, 1]}

>>> pandas.DataFrame.from_dict(reform, orient='index').transpose()
>>> df.columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(df.columns)
   A     B   
   a  b  a  b
0  1  6  2  7
1  2  7  3  8
2  3  8  4  9
3  4  9  5  1
4  5  1  6  NaN
[5 rows x 4 columns]
0

This recursive function should work:

def reform_dict(dictionary, t=tuple(), reform={}):
    for key, val in dictionary.items():
        t = t + (key,)
        if isinstance(val, dict):
            reform_dict(val, t, reform)
        else:
            reform.update({t: val})
        t = t[:-1]
    return reform

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