I'm learning XQuery and tried a moderate complex example. The query itself works, but I'm failing to add the HTML the way I want.

The following example works (in eXist-db XQuery engine)

for $current_value in $another_variable//some_tag/@attribute
return 
    <div><h1>{$current_value}</h1>
    {
    for $current_sub_value in $another_variable//some_tag
    where $current_sub_value/@attribute = $current_value
    return <p> { data($current_sub_value/@another_attribute) } </p>
    }
    </div>

But actually

  • I want to get rid of the wrapping div.
  • Instead of a new paragraph for each sub-result (p ... /p) I'd like to simply have a line break (br) after each single result.

So, the expected result would be something like this:

<h1> ... some text here ... </h1>
some text here ... <br />
another line here ... <br />

However, whatever I've tried I always got a syntax errors.

It seems that it is possible to declare XQuery within an enclosing XML tag with { ... }. But what do I do if the XML tag isn't around the XQuery but just before or afterward?

Is there a way to tell the XQuery engine: Here is a bit of XQuery and here is some HTML, simply concat them together? (The XPath function concat() didn't work for me, it resulted in the <br /> being displayed, the < > are quite surely escaped.)

As stated above I've tried something with the syntax but got always error messages. Here is what I did:

Test 1/3

for $current_value in $another_variable//some_tag/@attribute
return 
    <h1>{$current_value}</h1>
    {
    for $current_sub_value in $another_variable//some_tag
    where $current_sub_value/@attribute = $current_value
    return <p> { data($current_sub_value/@another_attribute) } </p>
    }

Resulted in:

error found while executing expression: org.exist.xquery.XPathException: err:XPST0003 unexpected token: { [at line 4, column 5]

Test 2/3

for $current_value in $another_variable//some_tag/@attribute
{
return 
    <h1>{$current_value}</h1>
    for $current_sub_value in $another_variable//some_tag
    where $current_sub_value/@attribute = $current_value
    return <p> { data($current_sub_value/@another_attribute) } </p>
}

Resulted in:

error found while executing expression: org.exist.xquery.XPathException: err:XPST0003 unexpected token: { [at line 2, column 1]

Test 3/3

for $current_value in $another_variable//some_tag/@attribute
return
    <div>
    <h1>{$current_value}</h1>
    {
    for $current_sub_value in $another_variable//some_tag
    where $current_sub_value/@attribute = $current_value
    return data($current_sub_value/@another_attribute) <br/>
    }

Resulted in:

unexpected token: > (while expecting closing tag for element constructor: div)

  • Please always describe what you tried and why it failed for you, and what exactly the expected output is. And have a look on how to format your question properly (in the FAQ), makes it much easier to read (especially: code formatting and enumerations). – Jens Erat Jul 28 '14 at 9:13
  • Corrected the enumeration. But what's wrong with the code formatting? – cis Jul 28 '14 at 9:35
  • Question looks great now. Better always apply inline code formatting using backticks around the code, especially if anything might be interpreted as HTML or markdown. I just added some of them. – Jens Erat Jul 28 '14 at 9:38
up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you basically want is a sequence of items. In XML, an element always has one single root node. So for example regarding your paragraph, <p>something</p> is an element, whereas your desired output something<br/> is a sequence of items, in this case of a string and an element.

In XQuery, a sequence is simply wrapped by paranthesis, e.g. ('s', <a/>, 45) is a sequence.

So in your case, the following should work as expected:

for $current_value in $another_variable//some_tag/@attribute
return (
  <h1>{$current_value}</h1>,
  for $current_sub_value in $another_variable//some_tag
  where $current_sub_value/@attribute = $current_value
  return (data($current_sub_value/@another_attribute), <br />)
)

dirkk does an excellent job explaining sequences vs. mixed nodes. Understanding the distinction and where to use them will get you a long way.

Another aspect of eXist-DB in particular, though, is optimization. For the internal optimizer to work, it's best to avoid WHERE phrases and instead use predicates.

For example, take dirkk's solution above and modify the WHERE to use a predicate:

for $current_value in $another_variable//some_tag/@attribute
return (
  <h1>{$current_value}</h1>,
  for $current_sub_value in $another_variable//some_tag[@attribute = $current_value]
  return (data($current_sub_value/@another_attribute), <br />)
)

Indexing is the other key to bring out the performance. But it's just good to get into the practice of using predicates to handle conditionals over WHERE. More on this topic can be found at: http://exist-db.org/exist/apps/doc/tuning.xml

Hope this helps.

  • Thanks!, didn't know that. But I think for purpose of learning it's a good idea to get used to the syntax and typical elements (as WHERE) before moving on to optimizing. So, I will look at that later... – cis Jul 29 '14 at 6:50
  • I would argue that predicates i.e. the [ ] bits are typical syntax elements just as much as WHERE is ;-) – adamretter Jul 29 '14 at 8:27

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