29

I'm learning Go. Here is a code snippet that reads CSV file:

func parseLocation(file string) (map[string]Point, error) {
    f, err := os.Open(file)
    defer f.Close()
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }
    lines, err := csv.NewReader(f).ReadAll()
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }
    locations := make(map[string]Point)
    for _, line := range lines {
        name := line[0]
        lat, laterr := strconv.ParseFloat(line[1], 64)
        if laterr != nil {
            return nil, laterr
        }
        lon, lonerr := strconv.ParseFloat(line[2], 64)
        if lonerr != nil {
            return nil, lonerr
        }
        locations[name] = Point{lat, lon}
    }
    return locations, nil
}

Is there a way to improve readability of this code? if and nil noise.

2
  • 7
    The defer statement must come after the if err != nil: if there is an error at this point, this is because the file could not have been opened, thus, you must not use Close on it. – julienc Jul 28 '14 at 15:53
  • 2
    @julienc the defer statement doesn't need to come after the error checking. You can certainly close a file you didn't open: play.golang.org/p/vcxShZp00J – Dustin Jul 30 '14 at 0:30
27

Go is a very verbose language, however you could use something like this:

// predeclare err
func parseLocation(file string) (locations map[string]*Point, err error) {
    f, err := os.Open(file)
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }
    defer f.Close() // this needs to be after the err check

    lines, err := csv.NewReader(f).ReadAll()
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }

    //already defined in declaration, no need for :=
    locations = make(map[string]*Point, len(lines))
    var lat, lon float64 //predeclare lat, lon
    for _, line := range lines {
        // shorter, cleaner and since we already have lat and err declared, we can do this.
        if lat, err = strconv.ParseFloat(line[1], 64); err != nil {
            return nil, err
        }
        if lon, err = strconv.ParseFloat(line[2], 64); err != nil {
            return nil, err
        }
        locations[line[0]] = &Point{lat, lon}
    }
    return locations, nil
}

//edit

A more efficient and proper version was posted by @Dustin in the comments, I'm adding it here for completeness sake:

func parseLocation(file string) (map[string]*Point, error) {
    f, err := os.Open(file)
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }
    defer f.Close()

    csvr := csv.NewReader(f)

    locations := map[string]*Point{}
    for {
        row, err := csvr.Read()
        if err != nil {
            if err == io.EOF {
                err = nil
            }
            return locations, err
        }

        p := &Point{}
        if p.lat, err = strconv.ParseFloat(row[1], 64); err != nil {
            return nil, err
        }
        if p.lon, err = strconv.ParseFloat(row[2], 64); err != nil {
            return nil, err
        }
        locations[row[0]] = p
    }
}

playground

6
  • 3
    I would advise against naming those return variables. You don't even use them as named, it just causes extra confusion. Reading the whole thing into memory at once before parsing it is unnecessary. Should always avoid that. The lat/long predeclaration is in too high a scope, but really unnecessary. I'd do this: play.golang.org/p/3YE2pXSF3x – Dustin Jul 30 '14 at 0:37
  • You should post this as an answer, you got my up vote. – OneOfOne Jul 30 '14 at 0:46
  • I considered it, but it's almost your answer, just with a few minor changes. The thing I'd be worried most about is the memory consumption, but you took that from the original. – Dustin Jul 30 '14 at 0:50
  • @OneOfOne Why would you say that go is "a very verbose language"? – Rodrigo Feb 3 '16 at 22:28
  • @user3666882 because it is, there are no "shortcuts" like most other languages, I mean there isn't even a trinity operator. – OneOfOne Feb 3 '16 at 23:02
34

Go now has a csv package for this. Its is encoding/csv. You can find the docs here: https://golang.org/pkg/encoding/csv/

There are a couple of good examples in the docs. Here is a helper method I created to read a csv file and returns its records.

package main

import (
    "encoding/csv"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func readCsvFile(filePath string) [][]string {
    f, err := os.Open(filePath)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal("Unable to read input file " + filePath, err)
    }
    defer f.Close()

    csvReader := csv.NewReader(f)
    records, err := csvReader.ReadAll()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal("Unable to parse file as CSV for " + filePath, err)
    }

    return records
}

func main() {
    records := readCsvFile("../tasks.csv")
    fmt.Println(records)
}
0
18

I basically copied my answer from here: https://www.dotnetperls.com/csv-go. For me, this was a better answer than what I found on stackoverflow.

import (
    "bufio"
    "encoding/csv"
    "os"
    "fmt"
    "io"
)

func ReadCsvFile(filePath string)  {
    // Load a csv file.
    f, _ := os.Open(filePath)

    // Create a new reader.
    r := csv.NewReader(f)
    for {
        record, err := r.Read()
        // Stop at EOF.
        if err == io.EOF {
            break
        }

        if err != nil {
            panic(err)
        }
        // Display record.
        // ... Display record length.
        // ... Display all individual elements of the slice.
        fmt.Println(record)
        fmt.Println(len(record))
        for value := range record {
            fmt.Printf("  %v\n", record[value])
        }
    }
}
1
  • for _, value := range reader {fmt.Printf(" %v\n", value)} Works as well – i73 Apr 30 at 20:05
0

I also dislike the verbosity of the default Reader, so I made a new type that is similar to bufio#Scanner:

package main
import "encoding/csv"
import "io"

type Scanner struct {
   Reader *csv.Reader
   Head map[string]int
   Row []string
}

func NewScanner(o io.Reader) Scanner {
   csv_o := csv.NewReader(o)
   a, e := csv_o.Read()
   if e != nil {
      return Scanner{}
   }
   m := map[string]int{}
   for n, s := range a {
      m[s] = n
   }
   return Scanner{Reader: csv_o, Head: m}
}

func (o *Scanner) Scan() bool {
   a, e := o.Reader.Read()
   o.Row = a
   return e == nil
}

func (o Scanner) Text(s string) string {
   return o.Row[o.Head[s]]
}

Example:

package main
import "strings"

func main() {
   s := `Month,Day
January,Sunday
February,Monday`

   o := NewScanner(strings.NewReader(s))
   for o.Scan() {
      println(o.Text("Month"), o.Text("Day"))
   }
}

https://golang.org/pkg/encoding/csv

-2

You can also read contents of a directory to load all the CSV files. And then read all those CSV files 1 by 1 with goroutines

csv file:

101,300.00,11000901,1155686400
102,250.99,11000902,1432339200

main.go file:

const sourcePath string = "./source"

func main() {
    dir, _ := os.Open(sourcePath)
    files, _ := dir.Readdir(-1)

    for _, file := range files {
        fmt.Println("SINGLE FILE: ")
        fmt.Println(file.Name())
        filePath := sourcePath + "/" + file.Name()
        f, _ := os.Open(filePath)
        defer f.Close()
        // os.Remove(filePath)

        //func
        go func(file io.Reader) {
            records, _ := csv.NewReader(file).ReadAll()
            for _, row := range records {
                fmt.Println(row)
            }
        }(f)

        time.Sleep(10 * time.Millisecond)// give some time to GO routines for execute
    }
}

And the OUTPUT will be:

$ go run main.go

SINGLE FILE:
batch01.csv
[101 300.00 11000901 1155686400]
[102 250.99 11000902 1432339200]

----------------- -------------- ---------------------- ------- ---------------- ------------------- ----------- --------------

Below example with the Invoice struct

func main() {
    dir, _ := os.Open(sourcePath)
    files, _ := dir.Readdir(-1)

    for _, file := range files {
        fmt.Println("SINGLE FILE: ")
        fmt.Println(file.Name())
        filePath := sourcePath + "/" + file.Name()
        f, _ := os.Open(filePath)
        defer f.Close()

        go func(file io.Reader) {
            records, _ := csv.NewReader(file).ReadAll()
            for _, row := range records {
                invoice := new(Invoice)
                invoice.InvoiceNumber = row[0]
                invoice.Amount, _ = strconv.ParseFloat(row[1], 64)
                invoice.OrderID, _ = strconv.Atoi(row[2])
                unixTime, _ := strconv.ParseInt(row[3], 10, 64)
                invoice.Date = time.Unix(unixTime, 0)

                fmt.Printf("Received invoice `%v` for $ %.2f \n", invoice.InvoiceNumber, invoice.Amount)
            }
        }(f)

        time.Sleep(10 * time.Millisecond)
    }
}

type Invoice struct {
    InvoiceNumber string
    Amount        float64
    OrderID       int
    Date          time.Time
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.