22

The problem comes from Codility programming training and it sounds as follows: we have an array (A[]) with n (ranging from 1 to 100,000) elements and these are our parameters. The elements of the array are integers from −2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647, and we need to find smallest positive integer that is NOT in the array. Of course this could be done easily in O(n*log n) by sorting them all and going through the sorted array, looking for the missing posiitve number (this last operation has O(n) worst time complexity in my solution). But according to Codility, this ENTIRE problem can be done in O(n), and I cannot see any way to do that. Could someone give some tips to let me get un-stuck?

PS Here is a link to detailed description of the problem which I'm not allowed to copy - https://codility.com/c/intro/demo35UEXH-EAT

  • 1
    is it okay to allocate temp storage of size O(n)? – sds Jul 28 '14 at 19:08
  • 1
    Questions asking for correct algorithm are not appropriate on SO, try codegolf.stackexchange.com. That said, you can iterate the array till you find the first positive integer and initialize the result to that number; and then iterate the rest modifying the result when a you find a number smaller than current result. – Miserable Variable Jul 28 '14 at 19:14
  • This question appears to be off-topic because it is asking for "best algorithm" – Miserable Variable Jul 28 '14 at 19:14
  • 3
    What's up with closing as too broad? The question contains an exact and formal problem statement: how to do one specific thing in O(n). Generally, I sometimes see algorithm questions being closed when code is secondary to algorithm, but fail to understand why: it's still a programming question, the algorithm tag has 85.5k questions, and the tour suggests "Software algorithms" are on-topic as the second of the four check marks. If such questions are not welcome here, please kindly educate me why. – Gassa Jul 13 '18 at 22:34

27 Answers 27

42

By pigeonhole principle, at least one of the numbers 1, 2, ..., n+1 is not in the array. Let us create a boolean array b of size n+1 to store whether each of these numbers is present.

Now, we process the input array. If we find a number from 1 to n+1, we mark the corresponding entry in b. If the number we see does not fit into these bounds, just discard it and proceed to the next one. Both cases are O(1) per input entry, total O(n).

After we are done processing the input, we can find the first non-marked entry in our boolean array b trivially in O(n).

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    @sammy333: This notion does not invalidate the solution: the input numbers can be any signed int32s, but we are interested only in the occurrences of 1, 2, ..., n + 1 among them, as one of these is guaranteed to be the answer. – Gassa Dec 22 '14 at 12:08
  • 6
    N is an integer within the range [1..100,000]; each element of array A is an integer within the range [−2,147,483,648..2,147,483,647]. Your solution only works when the max element in the array is 100,000. – Cristian May 18 '15 at 22:59
  • 10
    @Cristian But the answer is always from 1 to 100,001, and that's the fact we use. Please read again. – Gassa May 19 '15 at 10:29
  • 1
    Gassa is right. We have to allocate array only for 100,001 elements and ignore others. – Rostyslav Druzhchenko Sep 30 '15 at 9:39
  • 2
    How do u check the presence for a number in the array A? Using contains leads to bad performance... – Legends Nov 16 '16 at 12:31
15

Simple solution 100% in Java.

Please note it is O(nlogn) solution but gives 100% result in codility.

public static int solution(final int[] A) 
{   
   Arrays.sort(A);
   int min = 1;

   // Starting from 1 (min), compare all elements, if it does not match 
   // that would the missing number.
   for (int i : A) {
     if (i == min) {
       min++;
     }
   }

   return min;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Simple and more performant than other solutions posted. Very nice! – shanahobo86 Jun 8 '18 at 11:46
  • Very simple and helpful for me to understand the problem – Eric MaCarthy Dec 20 '18 at 12:56
  • 6
    This is O(n log n) not O(n) due to the sorting. – swanhella Feb 5 '19 at 0:06
  • I understand it is o(nlogn) solution, but it gives 100% result in codility. – Anand Oct 30 '19 at 15:01
  • This is a clever one. For a small improvement, we can add another branch after if (i == min) - if i > min, we can return min right away. – flow2k Sep 16 at 1:31
9

wrote this today and got 100/100. not the most elegant solution, but easy to understand -

public int solution(int[] A) {
    int max = A.length;
    int threshold = 1;
    boolean[] bitmap = new boolean[max + 1];

    //populate bitmap and also find highest positive int in input list.
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        if (A[i] > 0 && A[i] <= max) {
            bitmap[A[i]] = true;
        }

        if (A[i] > threshold) {
            threshold = A[i];
        }
    }

    //find the first positive number in bitmap that is false.
    for (int i = 1; i < bitmap.length; i++) {
        if (!bitmap[i]) {
            return i;
        }
    }

    //this is to handle the case when input array is not missing any element.
    return (threshold+1);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Is someone downvoting all the solutions? comments were included in the code in my case. – Quest Monger Jul 9 '15 at 0:50
7

Build a hash table of all the values. For the numbers 1 to n + 1, check if they are in the hash table. At least one of them is not. Print out the lowest such number.

This is O(n) expected time (you can get with high probability). See @Gassa's answer for how to avoid the hash table in favor of a lookup table of size O(n).

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    No need to hash: as we know that the answer is in the first n+1 positive integers, we can consider just them and discard everything else. See my answer for details. – Gassa Jul 28 '14 at 19:39
  • @Gassa Interesting, my brain failed to make that simple progression – Niklas B. Jul 28 '14 at 19:49
4
public int solutionMissingInteger(int[] A) {
    int solution = 1;
    HashSet<Integer> hashSet = new HashSet<>();

    for(int i=0; i<A.length; ++i){
        if(A[i]<1) continue;
        if(hashSet.add(A[i])){
            //this int was not handled before
            while(hashSet.contains(solution)){
                solution++;
            }
        }
    }

    return solution;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Marian, this answer give me 100% in Swift 3 also. – Cathal Aug 29 '17 at 9:22
4

Simple Java soution. Scored 100/100 in correctness and performance.

public int solution(int[] A) {
    int smallestMissingInteger = 1;
    if (A.length == 0) {
        return smallestMissingInteger;
    }
    Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        if (A[i] > 0) {
            set.add(A[i]);
        }
    }
    while (set.contains(smallestMissingInteger)) {
        smallestMissingInteger++;
    }
    return smallestMissingInteger;

}
| improve this answer | |
2

C# scored 100%,

Explanation: use of lookup table where we store already seen values from input array, we only care about values that are greater than 0 and lower or equal than length on input array

    public static int solution(int[] A)
    {
        var lookUpArray = new bool[A.Length];

        for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
            if (A[i] > 0 && A[i] <= A.Length)
                lookUpArray[A[i] - 1] = true;

        for (int i = 0; i < lookUpArray.Length; i++)
            if (!lookUpArray[i])
                return i + 1;

        return A.Length + 1;
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • Will it work with this array? [1, 233444] – alayor Feb 8 '17 at 3:38
2

100% Javascript

function solution(A) {
        // write your code in JavaScript (Node.js 4.0.0)
        var max = 0;
        var array = [];
        for (var i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
            if (A[i] > 0) {
                if (A[i] > max) {
                    max = A[i];
                }
                array[A[i]] = 0;
            }
        }
        var min = max;
        if (max < 1) {
            return 1;
        }
        for (var j = 1; j < max; j++) {
            if (typeof array[j] === 'undefined') {
                return j
            }
        }
        if (min === max) {
            return max + 1;
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • You can remove min related lines. max variable is not changing after assigning max to min. – ugurtemiz Nov 27 '17 at 20:14
2

JavaScript 100%

function solution(A) {
  let sortedOb = {};
  let biggest = 0;

  A.forEach(el => {
    if (el > 0) {
      sortedOb[el] = 0;
      biggest = el > biggest ? el : biggest;
    }
  });
  let arr = Object.keys(sortedOb).map(el => +el);
  if (arr.length == 0) return 1;

  for(let i = 1; i <= biggest; i++) {
    if (sortedOb[i] === undefined) return i;
  }
  return biggest + 1;
}
| improve this answer | |
1

100%: the Python sort routine is not regarded as cheating...

def solution(A):
    """
    Sort the array then loop till the value is higher than expected
    """
    missing = 1
    for elem in sorted(A):
        if elem == missing:
            missing += 1
        if elem > missing:
            break
    return missing
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Not as cheating in itself. Please argue how this is O(n). – greybeard Jan 27 '16 at 1:39
  • Isn't it actually O(n+n)? The first one to do the sort, then a second time passing over the result of the sort. My comment is just observing that Codility don't penalize for using the sort routine with this problem. – John Mee Jan 27 '16 at 5:15
  • 1
    Is sort O(n)? Not for comparison based sorts: Ω(nlogn). – greybeard Jan 27 '16 at 8:30
  • Digest here and possibly here if you really want to know exactly how python2's sort is implemented. – John Mee Jan 28 '16 at 2:34
  • 2
    Thanks, but not the point: please argue how using pythons sort is O(n). – greybeard Jan 28 '16 at 7:05
1

This is my solution is Swift 4

public func solution(_ A: inout [Int]) -> Int {

    var minNum = 1
    var hashSet = Set<Int>()

    for int in A {
        if int > 0 {
            hashSet.insert(int)
        }
    }

    while hashSet.contains(minNum) {
        minNum += 1
    }

    return minNum

}

var array = [1,3,6]

solution(&array)

// Answer: 2

| improve this answer | |
  • Can you provide some more information of why this answers the OP's original question? – mjuarez Jan 11 '18 at 17:13
1

My solution. 100%. In Java.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

public class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        Arrays.sort(A);
        ArrayList<Integer> positive = new ArrayList<>();
        for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
            if(A[i] > 0)
                positive.add(A[i]);
        }
        if(positive.isEmpty()) return 1;
        if(positive.get(0) > 1) return 1;

        for(int i = 0; i < positive.size() - 1; i++) {
            if(positive.get(i + 1) - positive.get(i) > 1)
                return positive.get(i) + 1;
        }

        return positive.get(positive.size() - 1) + 1;
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Solution solution = new Solution();
        int[] A = {-5,1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9,5};
        System.out.println(solution.solution(A)); 
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I submitted your solution to coditily and they evaluated it as 100% correct, congratulations! – Bruno Negrão Zica May 31 '18 at 20:12
1

javascript 100% 100% first sort the array, you just need to scan positive elements so find index of 1 (if there is no 1 in array then answer is 1). then search elements after 1 till find missing number.

function solution(A) {
// write your code in JavaScript (Node.js 6.4.0)

   var missing = 1;
   // sort the array.
   A.sort(function(a, b) { return a-b });

   // try to find the 1 in sorted array if there is no 1 so answer is 1
   if ( A.indexOf(1) == -1) { return 1; }

   // just search positive numbers to find missing number 
   for ( var i = A.indexOf(1); i < A.length; i++) {
      if ( A[i] != missing) {
        missing++;
        if ( A[i] != missing ) { return missing; }
      }
   }

   // if cant find any missing number return next integer number
   return missing + 1;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

I believe the solution is more involved than 'marking' corresponding values using a boolean array of n (100,000) elements. The boolean array of size n will not 'directly' map to the possible range of values (−2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647). This Java example I wrote attempts to map the 100K rows by mapping the value based on their offset from the max value. It also performs a modulus to reduce the resulting array to the same size as the sample element length.

/** 
 * 
 * This algorithm calculates the values from the min value and mods this offset with the size of the 100K sample size. 
 * This routine performs 3 scans. 
 * 1. Find the min/max
 * 2. Record the offsets for the positive integers
 * 3. Scan the offsets to find missing value.
 * 
 * @author Paul Goddard
 *
 */
public class SmallestPositiveIntMissing {
    static int ARRAY_SIZE = 100000;
    public static int solve(int[] array) {
        int answer = -1;
        Maxmin maxmin = getMaxmin(array);
        int range = maxmin.max - maxmin.min;
        System.out.println("min:   " + maxmin.min);
        System.out.println("max:   " + maxmin.max);
        System.out.println("range: " + range);
        Integer[] values = new Integer[ARRAY_SIZE];
        if (range == ARRAY_SIZE) {
            System.out.println("No gaps");
            return maxmin.max + 1;
        }
        for (int val: array) {
            if (val > 0) {
                int offset = val - maxmin.min;
                int index = offset % ARRAY_SIZE;
                values[index] = val;
            } 
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE; i++) {
            if (values[i] == null) {
                int missing = maxmin.min + i;
                System.out.println("Missing: " + missing);
                answer = missing;
                break;
            }
        }
        return answer;
    }

    public static Maxmin getMaxmin(int[] array) {
        int max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
        int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        for (int val:array) {
            if (val >=0) {
                if (val > max) max = val;
                if (val < min) min = val;
            }
        }
        return new Maxmin(max,min);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] A = arrayBuilder();
        System.out.println("Min not in array: " + solve(A));
    }

    public static int[] arrayBuilder() {

        int[] array = new int[ARRAY_SIZE];
        Random random = new Random();

        System.out.println("array: ");
        for (int i=0;i < ARRAY_SIZE; i++) {
            array[i] = random.nextInt();
            System.out.print(array[i] + ", ");
        }
        System.out.println(" array done.");

        return array;
    }

}
class Maxmin {
    int max;
    int min;
    Maxmin(int max, int min) {
        this.max = max;
        this.min = min;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Sweet Swift version. 100% correct

public func solution(inout A : [Int]) -> Int {
    //Create a Hash table
    var H = [Int:Bool]()
    // Create the minimum possible return value
    var high = 1
    //Iterate
    for i in 0..<A.count {
        // Get the highest element
        high = A[i] > high ? A[i] : high
        // Fill hash table
        if (A[i] > 0){
            H[A[i]] = true
        }
    }
    // iterate through possible values on the hash table
    for j in 1...high {
        // If you could not find it on the hash, return it
        if H[j] != true {
            return j
        } else {
            // If you went through all values on the hash
            // and can't find it, return the next higher value
            // e.g.: [1,2,3,4] returns 5
            if (j == high) {
                return high + 1
            }
        }
    }
    return high
}
| improve this answer | |
0

It worked for me. It is not O(n), but little simpler:

import java.util.stream.*;
class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        A = IntStream.of(A)
            .filter(x->x>0)
            .distinct()
            .sorted()
            .toArray();

        int min = 1;
        for(int val : A)
        {
            if(val==min)
                min++;
            else
                return min;
        }
        return min;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This is not "expected worst-case time complexity is O(N)" – Samuel Pinto Jan 7 '16 at 18:32
0
int[] copy = new int[A.length];
        for (int i : A)
        {
            if (i > 0 && i <= A.length)
            {
                copy[i - 1] = 1;
            }
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < copy.length; i++)
        {
            if (copy[i] == 0)
            {
                return i + 1;
            }
        }
        return A.length + 1;
| improve this answer | |
0

Swift 3 - 100%

public func solution(_ A : inout [Int]) -> Int {
// write your code in Swift 3.0 (Linux)

var solution = 1
var hashSet = Set<Int>()

    for int in A
    {
        if int > 0
        {
            hashSet.insert(int)

            while hashSet.contains(solution)
            {
                solution += 1
            }
        }
    }

    return solution
}

Thanks to Marian's answer above.

| improve this answer | |
  • How do you guys can come up with this beautiful answers? – J. Goce Sep 5 '19 at 3:03
0

This is my solution using python:

def solution(A):
    m = max(A)

    if m <= 0:
        return 1

    if m == 1:
        return 2

    # Build a sorted list with all elements in A
    s = sorted(list(set(A)))

    b = 0

    # Iterate over the unique list trying to find integers not existing in A
    for i in xrange(len(s)):
        x = s[i]

        # If the current element is lte 0, just skip it
        if x <= 0:
            continue;

        b = b + 1

        # If the current element is not equal to the current position,
        # it means that the current position is missing from A
        if x != b:
            return b

    return m + 1

Scored 100%/100% https://codility.com/demo/results/demoDCU7CA-SBR/

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Ah, the beauty of Python is lost. A simple two-liner also gives 100%; discard negatives and make a set (no need to -explicitly- sort) A = set([a if a>0 else 0 for a in A]), then just get the set difference with the 1...N array diff = set(range(1, len(A)+2)).difference(A), and return min(diff). – Kostas Mouratidis Sep 30 '19 at 14:09
  • How about: solution = lambda arr=[]: next(iter([i for i in range(1, len(arr) + 2) if i not in set(arr)])) or 1 – Davi Lima May 24 at 1:19
0
  1. Create a binary array bin of N+1 length (C uses 0 based indexing)

  2. Traverse the binary array O(n)

  3. If A[i] is within the bounds of bin then mark bin entry at index A[i] as present or true.
  4. Traverse the binary array again
  5. Index of any bin entry that is not present or false is your missing integer

~

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<stdbool.h>

int solution(int A[], int N) {
    // write your code in C99 (gcc 6.2.0)
    int i;
    bool *bin = (bool *)calloc((N+1),sizeof(bool));

    for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
    {
        if (A[i] > 0 && A[i] < N+1)
        {
            bin[A[i]] = true;
        }
    }

    for (i = 1; i < N+1; i++)
    {
        if (bin[i] == false)
        {
            break;
        }
    }

    return i;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Even when your post, answers OP's question. Please provide not only a snippet that works. But explain what's happening, why it does what it should to etc. – Lino Dec 29 '17 at 7:07
  • this solution is O(n^2) – davegallant Apr 2 '19 at 10:32
  • Please explain how? This is actually O(n). – Naveed Rasheed Apr 4 '19 at 6:47
-1

May be helpful, I am using arithmetic progression to calculate the sum, and using binary searach the element is fetched. checked with array of couple of hundred values works good. As there is one for loop and itression in step of 2, O(n/2) or less

def Missingelement (A):
    B = [x for x in range(1,max(A)+1,1)]
    n1 = len(B) - 1
    begin = 0
    end = (n1)//2
    result = 0
    print(A)
    print(B)
    if (len(A) < len(B)):
        for i in range(2,n1,2):
            if BinSum(A,begin,end) > BinSum(B,begin,end) :
               end = (end + begin)//2
               if (end - begin) <= 1 :
                result=B[begin + 1 ]    
            elif BinSum(A,begin,end) == BinSum(B,begin,end):
                r = end - begin
                begin = end 
                end = (end + r)

            if begin == end :
                result=B[begin + 1 ]    
    return result         


def BinSum(C,begin,end):
    n = (end - begin)

    if end >= len(C): 
        end = len(C) - 1
    sum =  n*((C[begin]+C[end])/2)
    return sum                


def main():
    A=[1,2,3,5,6,7,9,10,11,12,14,15]
    print ("smallest number missing is ",Missingelement(A))
if __name__ == '__main__': main()
| improve this answer | |
-1

Code for C, in fact, this can be used for any programming language without any change in the logic.

Logic is sum of N number is N*(N+1)/2.

int solution(int A[], int N) {

    // write your code in C99
    long long sum=0;
    long long i;
    long long Nsum=0;

    for(i=0;i<N;i++){
        sum=sum + (long long)A[i];
    }

    if (N%2==0){
        Nsum= (N+1)*((N+2)/2);
        return (int)(Nsum-sum);
    }
    else{
        Nsum= ((N+1)/2)*(N+2);
        return (int)(Nsum-sum);
    }    

}

This gave the 100/100 score.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This technique only works if there is only 1 number missing from the array. This is not the case here. – SirGuy Dec 15 '15 at 14:11
-1

This solution gets 100/100 on the test:

class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {

        int x = 0;
        while (x < A.length) {
            // Keep swapping the values into the matching array positions.
            if (A[x] > 0 && A[x] <= A.length && A[A[x]-1] != A[x])  {
                swap(A, x, A[x] - 1);
            } else {
                x++; // Just need to increment when current element and position match.
            }
        }

        for (int y=0; y < A.length; y++) {
            // Find first element that doesn't match position.
            // Array is 0 based while numbers are 1 based.
            if (A[y] != y + 1)  {
                return y + 1;
            }
        }

        return A.length + 1;
    }

    private void swap (int[] a, int i, int j) {
        int t = a[i];
        a[i] = a[j];
        a[j] = t;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
-1

100% in PHP https://codility.com/demo/results/trainingKFXWKW-56V/

function solution($A){
    $A = array_unique($A);
    sort($A);
    if (empty($A)) return 1;
    if (max($A) <= 0) return 1;
    if (max($A) == 1) return 2;
    if (in_array(1, $A)) {
    $A = array_slice($A, array_search(1, $A)); // from 0 to the end
    array_unshift($A, 0); // Explanation 6a
    if ( max($A) == array_search(max($A), $A)) return max($A) + 1; // Explanation 6b
        for ($i = 1; $i <= count($A); $i++){
                if ($A[$i] != $i) return $i; // Explanation 6c
        }
    } else {
        return 1;
    }
}

// Explanation

  1. remove all duplicates
  2. sort from min to max
  3. if the array is empty return 1
  4. if max of array is zero or less, return 1
  5. if max of array is 1, return 2 // next positive integer
  6. all other cases: 6a) split the array from value 1 to the end and add 0 before first number 6b) if the value of last element of array is the max of array, then the array is ascending so we return max + 1 // next positive integer 6c) if the array is not ascending, we find a missing number by a function for: if key of element is not as value the element but it should be (A = [0=>0, 1=>1,2=>3,...]), we return the key, because we expect the key and value to be equal.
| improve this answer | |
  • Please format your code properly and add some information on how this code is supposed to answer the initial question. – user1438038 Dec 15 '15 at 12:57
-1

Here is my solution, it Yields 88% in evaluation- Time is O(n), Correctness 100%, Performance 75%. REMEMBER - it is possible to have an array of all negative numbers, or numbers that exceed 100,000. Most of the above solutions (with actual code) yield much lower scores, or just do not work. Others seem to be irrelevant to the Missing Integer problem presented on Codility.

int compare( const void * arg1, const void * arg2 )
{
    return *((int*)arg1) - *((int*)arg2);
}

solution( int A[], int N )
{
    // Make a copy of the original array
    // So as not to disrupt it's contents.
    int * A2 = (int*)malloc( sizeof(int) * N );
    memcpy( A2, A1, sizeof(int) * N );

    // Quick sort it.
    qsort( &A2[0], N, sizeof(int), compare );

    // Start out with a minimum of 1 (lowest positive number)
    int min = 1;
    int i = 0;

    // Skip past any negative or 0 numbers.
    while( (A2[i] < 0) && (i < N )
    {
        i++;
    }

    // A variable to tell if we found the current minimum
    int found;
    while( i < N )
    {
        // We have not yet found the current minimum
        found = 0;
        while( (A2[i] == min) && (i < N) )
        {
            // We have found the current minimum
            found = 1;
            // move past all in the array that are that minimum
            i++;
        }
        // If we are at the end of the array
        if( i == N )
        {
            // Increment min once more and get out.
            min++;
            break;
        }
        // If we found the current minimum in the array
        if( found == 1 )
        {
            // progress to the next minimum
            min++;
        }
        else
        {
            // We did not find the current minimum - it is missing
            // Get out - the current minimum is the missing one
            break;
        }
    }

    // Always free memory.
    free( A2 );
    return min;
}
| improve this answer | |
-1

My 100/100 solution

  public int solution(int[] A) {
        Arrays.sort(A);
        for (int i = 1; i < 1_000_000; i++) {
            if (Arrays.binarySearch(A, i) < 0){
                return i;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
| improve this answer | |
-2
    static int spn(int[] array)
    {
        int returnValue = 1;
        int currentCandidate = 2147483647;

        foreach (int item in array)
        {
            if (item > 0)
            {
                if (item < currentCandidate)
                {
                    currentCandidate = item;
                }
                if (item <= returnValue)
                {
                    returnValue++;
                } 
            }
        }

        return returnValue;
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Try to explain, at least a bit your answer. Moreover, your solution is certainly not optimal in term of worst case complexity. – perror Aug 1 '14 at 12:47

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