3

I am trying to allocate memory for a triple pointer. I have the following:

int i, j;
int n = 4;

int ***X = (int ***) malloc(sizeof(int) * n);
for(i = 0; i < n; i++){
      printf("h\n");
      X[i] = (int **) malloc(sizeof(int) * n);
      for(j = 0; j < n; j++){
            printf("j\n");
            X[i][j] = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * n);
      }
}

X[0][0][0] = 14;
X[1][2][2] = 15;

When I run this on Linux, I get *** glibc detected *** triplePointer: double free or corruption (out): 0x0000000000ea3050 *** error which I have completely no idea what it is implying. But when I run it on Windows with the -Wall flag, I get no errors. Can someone perhaps help me to find where my error is at.

Also, I am currently hard coding by having the statement X[0][0][0] = 14;. Is there a way that I can populate all the slots of this triple pointer by some random values?

3
  • 4
    Each of your sizeof() arguments is incorrect except the most inner. And I suspect when run under windows you're compiling as 32-bit, which has identical sizes for int and arbitrary data pointers. Compile it as a 64-bit process and you'll potentially see similar behavior as your Linux distro. – WhozCraig Jul 30 '14 at 5:33
  • Of course! I can't believe I missed that. Ahh.... – user3754974 Jul 30 '14 at 5:35
  • @user3754974 This will clear your all doubts – Jayesh Bhoi Jul 30 '14 at 5:50
9

Try the following code-

int ***X = (int ***) malloc(sizeof(int**) * n); //FIX 1
for(i = 0; i < n; i++){
  printf("h\n");
  X[i] = (int **) malloc(sizeof(int*) * n);  // FIX 2
  for(j = 0; j < n; j++){
        printf("j\n");
        X[i][j] = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * n);
  }
}

When you are allocating memory for Triple pointer first you need to allocate memory n double pointers.

int ***X = (int ***) malloc(sizeof(int**) * n); // Not sizeof(int)

Then for that double pointer you need to allocate memory for n single pointers

for(i = 0; i < n; i++)
  X[i] = (int **) malloc(sizeof(int*) * n);

For that single pointers you need to allocate memory finally

for(i = 0; i < n; i++)
 for(j = 0; j < n; j++)
        X[i][j] = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * n);

This is the way of allocation!


Though a bit more work, it is arguably more straight-forward to use the size of the target pointer dereferenced than coding the type in the sizeof() operator. See below, including the advised removal of malloc() casts in C programs.

int ***X = malloc(sizeof(*X) * n);
for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    printf("h\n");
    X[i] = malloc(sizeof(*(X[i])) * n);
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {
        printf("j\n");
        X[i][j] = malloc(sizeof(*(X[i][j])) * n);
    }
}

Note the only place you see an actual type in this is int ***X. Everything else is based on that initial declaration. Why is this arguably "better"? Ex: To change this entire thing to a 3D matrix of double would require changing one line: double ***X = ...

1
  • 1
    This code does fix the issue, but it would be a good idea to explain why it does. – cdhowie Jul 30 '14 at 5:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.