6

I'm working with a 3rd party REST API in which one of the fields (type string) has a known set of values that I've modeled as an enum in my code. The StringEnumConverter from JSON.NET correctly serializes all but one of these values as described by the [EnumMemberAttribute] annotation. For this field in particular, the REST API translates a null value to mean "System Default" in the 3rd party system; however, when JSON.NET serializes this it uses the member name instead of the value described in the annotation. I know I could write a custom converter to handle this , but my question is if there is a way to get this to work without one since it's only the null value that doesn't serialize correctly?

The enum I have defined in my code:

[JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter))]
public enum InitialScanLevel
{
    [EnumMember(Value = null)]
    SystemDefault,

    [EnumMember(Value = "0")]
    ModelDeviceOnly,

    [EnumMember(Value = "1")]
    InitialAppPopulation,

    [EnumMember(Value = "2")]
    DiscoverSslCerts,

    [EnumMember(Value = "3")]
    DiscoverOpenPorts,

    [EnumMember(Value = "4")]
    AdvancedPortDiscovery,

    [EnumMember(Value = "5")]
    DeepDiscovery
}

For InitialScanLevel.SystemDefault the resulting JSON is (not what the 3rd party API expects)

{
    other fields...,
    "initialScanLevel":"SystemDefault",
    other fields...
}

but should be

{
    other fields...,
    "initialScanLevel":null,
    other fields...
}

For InitialScanLevel.DeepDiscovery the resulting JSON is (this is what the 3rd party API expects)

{
    other fields...,
    "initialScanLevel":"5",
    other fields...
}
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  • @Jashaszun thanks for the edit. I didn't realize ` would highlight those correctly.
    – Chris
    Jul 30, 2014 at 16:03
  • Any time! :) BTW, you should probably read through the formatting help. There are probably lots of good-to-know tidbits of information there (certainly there's stuff in there that I might have been able to use but didn't know about for other posts of mine).
    – Jashaszun
    Jul 30, 2014 at 16:05
  • The reason for this behavior is that the WriteJson method StringEnumConverter does string enumName = e.ToString();. Fortunately, you can derive your own Converter from StringEnumConverter and override the WriteJson (and perhaps ReadJson) method. You'll need to implement there the desired behaviour for EnumMember value (or respective JSON value) being null.
    – user2819245
    Jul 30, 2014 at 16:10
  • @elgonzo I thought that was probably the solution but was optimistic that there might be a way to accomplish this with the annotations instead...thanks.
    – Chris
    Jul 30, 2014 at 16:13
  • Unfortunately, in the source code for default StringEnumConverter when it parses the EnumMemberAttribute it will override null Value with the name of the enum value. Jul 30, 2014 at 16:35

1 Answer 1

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I think the easies way to do it is using a custom StringEnumConverter

public class MyStringEnumConverter : Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter
{
    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        if (value.Equals(InitialScanLevel.SystemDefault)) value = null;
        base.WriteJson(writer, value, serializer);
    }
}

[JsonConverter(typeof(MyStringEnumConverter))]
public enum InitialScanLevel
{
 .....
}
1
  • thanks @L.B, I thought that was probably the case. I implemented your solution with a slight variation to accomodate the other enums that have the same oddity as well as to call StringEnumConverter.WriteJson() instead of base.WriteJson()
    – Chris
    Jul 30, 2014 at 17:15

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