7

I have the the following array of numbers in Ruby (higher is better), and I'd like to rank them. In other words, I want to convert the following sorted list:

[89 52 52 36 18 18 5]

to the following ranks:

[1 2 2 4 5 5 7]

For instance, the winner gets first place, there's a tie for second place, and so on. The important point, obviously, is that ties are possible and those ties must then skip the corresponding ranks. Any number of ties might be possible (3 people sharing second place).

Is there an elegant way to perform this kind of operation?

  • 1
    This is answered in this Question already: stackoverflow.com/a/19234660/1930295 – danielricecodes Jul 30 '14 at 17:20
  • 2
    Nope -- that one doesn't skip ranks as I've requested here. – aardvarkk Jul 30 '14 at 17:20
  • aard, why the Rails tag? Some people, like me, filter out Rails. I'm not sure how I stumbled onto the question, but you may miss good answers if you have unneeded tags. – Cary Swoveland Jul 31 '14 at 2:34
  • @CarySwoveland Huh, my mistake I guess. I'm using it in a Rails context (not that it matters for this question). I guess my logic has always been to err on the side of too many tags. I never really considered those who might ignore a question because it had too many tags. I'll keep it in mind for the future, and remove the Rails tag from this one. Thanks! – aardvarkk Jul 31 '14 at 3:18
11

Using Enumerable#group_by:

a = [89, 52, 52, 36, 18, 18, 5]

rank = 1
a.group_by {|x| x}.map { |k,v|
  ret = [rank] * v.size
  rank += v.size
  ret
}.flatten
# => [1, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 7]

UPDATE

rank, i = 1, 0
a.map { |x|
  i += 1
  x != a[i-2] ? rank = i : rank
}
# => [1, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 7]
  • I feel bad for downvoting now, sorry. I guess I was in a mood. It's just that your version is more complex than is necessary and doesn't perform especially well, and let's be honest, I was jealous that you got more upvotes than me. – Jordan Running Jul 31 '14 at 15:40
  • Hey, great update! I've updated the benchmarks below. It performs very well, and I think it definitely meets the "elegant" criterium. And since you edited your post I was able to change my silly downvote to an upvote. I hope @aardvark comes back to accept your answer! – Jordan Running Aug 1 '14 at 14:56
  • Actually, now that I look at it, this is the exact same solution as @simongarnier's, except that he uses each_with_index whereas you increment an i variable manually. It's interesting that your version is 20% faster. – Jordan Running Aug 1 '14 at 15:02
6

Using Enumerable#each_with_index to avoid going through the array for each iteration :

a = [89, 52, 52, 36, 18, 18, 5]
rank = 1
a.each_with_index.map{|value, i| a[i-1] == value ? rank : rank = i+1}

Edit : I guess I should also benchmark mine, here are the results

Calculating -------------------------------------
            falsetru       344 i/100ms
                sawa       436 i/100ms
              Jordan      1174 i/100ms
              Iceman        46 i/100ms
        simongarnier       710 i/100ms
-------------------------------------------------
            falsetru     3411.0 (±3.7%) i/s -      17200 in   5.049500s
                sawa     4437.4 (±3.4%) i/s -      22236 in   5.017073s
              Jordan    11746.5 (±2.3%) i/s -      59874 in   5.099797s
              Iceman      463.4 (±2.4%) i/s -       2346 in   5.065717s
        simongarnier     7442.1 (±3.2%) i/s -      37630 in   5.061725s

Not The best one, but still putting up a good fight!

5
a = [89, 52, 52, 36, 18, 18, 5]
a.map{ |e| a.index(e) + 1 }
# => [1, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 7]

Edit:

Benchmark from @Jordan gist (https://gist.github.com/jrunning/488de3a19428b9ebb488)

Calculating -------------------------------------
            falsetru       419 i/100ms
                sawa       514 i/100ms
              Jordan      1438 i/100ms
              Iceman        57 i/100ms
-------------------------------------------------
            falsetru     4232.8 (±2.5%) i/s -      21369 in   5.051639s
                sawa     5032.0 (±3.5%) i/s -      25186 in   5.011681s
              Jordan    15057.5 (±2.7%) i/s -      76214 in   5.065319s
              Iceman      575.7 (±1.9%) i/s -       2907 in   5.051481s
  • 1
    This is super clever, and performs on par with my solution for seven elements, but given 1000 elements ((0..1000).map { rand 100 }.sort.reverse) it's... bad. Really bad. gist.github.com/jrunning/488de3a19428b9ebb488 But still, clever! – Jordan Running Jul 30 '14 at 18:00
  • 1
    @Jordan It's an interesting thread this has turned into, wished more questions here on SO would yield such a discussion as this one. It also goes to show how important it is to really benchmark the code if performance is vital, as "clever" code is not always the most performant one. – Eyeslandic Jul 30 '14 at 21:53
4

I don't know about "elegant," but here's a short, readable, super-straightforward solution:

# assume a pre-sorted non-sparse array
arr = [89, 52, 52, 36, 18, 18, 18, 18, 7]

run = rank = 0
last_n = nil

ranked = arr.map do |n|
  run += 1
  next rank if n == last_n
  last_n = n
  rank += run
  run = 0
  rank
end

p ranked
# => [1, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 9]

Benchmarked

I guess we're doing this...

Edit: This post was getting way too long, so I've moved the benchmark code to a Gist: https://gist.github.com/jrunning/8549666d32a6bfa88e41

Here are the results:

      falsetru      730.9 (±2.1%) i/s -       3672 in   5.025755s
  falsetru (2)     1289.9 (±2.7%) i/s -       6500 in   5.042749s
          sawa      986.9 (±2.1%) i/s -       5000 in   5.068450s
        Jordan     1644.9 (±1.9%) i/s -       8250 in   5.017334s
        Iceman        6.4 (±0.0%) i/s -         32 in   5.035015s
  simongarnier     1053.9 (±1.9%) i/s -       5304 in   5.034452s
Cary Swoveland      511.4 (±3.5%) i/s -       2600 in   5.090605s

Edit: I had some stuff in here about Enumerator::Lazy, but it turns out I was using it wrong. It actually didn't improve performance in any case.

  • 1
    I don't think this properly skips values? Since there's a tie for second place, there should be no third place -- it should go straight to fourth. – aardvarkk Jul 30 '14 at 16:53
  • You're right, @aardvarkk. One moment. – Jordan Running Jul 30 '14 at 16:54
  • @aardvarkk Fixed. Not quite as pretty, but still by far the simplest (and, for long arrays, most performant) solution. – Jordan Running Jul 30 '14 at 17:02
  • 1
    P.S. For fun I wrote a recursive version. It's even cleaner, but it turns out to to be less than half as performant in the benchmark versus my other solution (but still 50+% faster than @sawa's solution). Ruby's method call overhead strikes again. – Jordan Running Jul 30 '14 at 17:49
  • 1
    I would like to retract my request that my solution be added to the benchmark (not really :-) ). – Cary Swoveland Aug 1 '14 at 15:31
2
a = [89, 52, 52, 36, 18, 18, 5]

a.group_by{|e| e}
.each_with_object([]){|(_, v), a| a.concat([a.length + 1] * v.length)}
# => [1, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 7]

require "ips"

@a = [89, 52, 52, 36, 18, 18, 5]

def method1
  rank = 1
  @a.group_by {|x| x}.map { |k,v|
    ret = [rank] * v.size
    rank += v.size
    ret
  }.flatten
end

def method2
  @a.group_by{|e| e}
  .each_with_object([]){|(_, v), a| a.concat([a.length + 1] * v.length)}
end

Benchmark.ips do |b|
  b.report{method1}
  b.report{method2}
end

Calculating -------------------------------------
                          8109 i/100ms
                         10160 i/100ms
-------------------------------------------------
                        99329.7 (±8.1%) i/s -     494649 in   5.018516s
                       137445.0 (±5.0%) i/s -     690880 in   5.040186s
  • 4
    A benchmark! The gloves are off! – aardvarkk Jul 30 '14 at 16:57
1

Another way, that uses Enumerable#chunk.

Code

def ranks(a)
  a.each_with_index
   .chunk { |e,_| e }
   .flat_map { |_,a| [a.first.last+1]*a.size }
end

Example

a = [89, 52, 52, 36, 18, 18, 5]

ranks(a)
  #=> [1, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 7]

Explanation

For the array a above:

b = a.each_with_index
  #=> #<Enumerator: [89, 52, 52, 36, 18, 18, 5]:each_with_index>
b.to_a # values to be passed to block
  #=> [[89, 0], [52, 1], [52, 2], [36, 3], [18, 4], [18, 5], [5, 6]]
c = b.chunk { |e,_| e }
  #=> #<Enumerator: #<Enumerator::Generator:0x000001010e39e8>:each>
c.to_a # values to be passed to block
  #=> [[89, [[89, 0]]],
  #    [52, [[52, 1], [52, 2]]],
  #    [36, [[36, 3]]],
  #    [18, [[18, 4], [18, 5]]],
  #    [5, [[5, 6]]]]
d = c.flat_map { |_,a| [a.first.last+1]*a.size }
  #=> [1, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 7]

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