-2

// I'm using a boolean function and it returns a false and true, but the main isn't //picking it up. The my_string.Is_full and my_string.Is_empty are suppose to say "it is not //full" and "it is not empty. Wrong syntax?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

const int SIZE = 5;

template <class New_Type>
class Array_Class
{
public:
    Array_Class();
    ~Array_Class();
    void Add(New_Type item);
    void Print();
    void PrintB();
    bool Is_Empty();
    bool Is_Full();

private:
    New_Type *A;
    New_Type *B;
    int count;
};


template <class New_Type>
Array_Class<New_Type>::Array_Class()
{
    cout << "You are inside the default constructor.\n";
    cout << "New_Type has a size of " << sizeof(New_Type) << " bytes\n\n";
    count = 0;
    A = new New_Type[SIZE];
}

template <class New_Type>
Array_Class<New_Type>::~Array_Class()
{
    cout << "The Destructor has been called.\n\n";
    delete[] A;
    count = 0;
    A = 0;
}


template <class New_Type>
void Array_Class<New_Type>::Add(New_Type item)
{
    if (count<SIZE)
    {
        A[count++] = item;
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "The array is full.\n";
    }
}


template <class New_Type>
void Array_Class<New_Type>::Print()
{
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i<count; i++)
    {
        cout << "A[" << i << "] = " << A[i] << endl;
    }
}

//my_String goes to here, which does get False

template <class New_Type>
bool Array_Class<New_Type>::Is_Full()
{
    if (count == SIZE)
    {
        return true;
    }
    else if (count < SIZE)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

//my_String goes to here, which does get False

template <class New_Type>
bool Array_Class<New_Type>::Is_Empty()
{
    if (count == 0)
    {
        return true;
    }
    else if (count > 0)
    {
        return false;
    }
}
int main()
{
    Array_Class<string> my_String;
    Array_Class<int> my_Ints;
    Array_Class<char> my_Chars;
    my_String.Add("Hello");
    my_String.Add("GoodBye");
    my_String.Add("ComeHere");
    my_String.Add("SayNo");

    my_Chars.Add('a');
    my_Chars.Add('b');
    my_Chars.Add('c');
    my_Chars.Add('d');
    my_Chars.Add('e');
    my_Chars.Add('f');
    my_Chars.Add('g');

    my_String.Print();
    my_Ints.Print();
    my_Chars.Print();

    cout << endl;

    my_Ints.Is_Empty();
    if (true)
    {
        cout << "It is empty" << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "It is not empty\n" << endl;
    }

my_String.Is_Empty(); is supposed to come out to false but goes straight to true

    my_String.Is_Empty();
    if (true)
    {
        cout << "It is empty" << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "It is not empty\n" << endl;
    }

    cout << endl;


    my_Chars.Is_Full();
    if (true)
    {
        cout << "It is full" << endl;
    }
    else if (false)
    {
        cout << "It is not full" << endl;
    }

my_String.Is_Full(); is supposed to come out to false but goes straight to true

    my_String.Is_Full();

    if (true)
    {
        cout << "It is full" << endl;
    }
    else if (false)
    {
        cout << "It is not full" << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
  • 4
    What do you expect it to return when count < 0? – chris Jul 30 '14 at 16:56
  • 1
    Because count can never be less than 0, you're--properly--ignoring it, but the way you've worded your if statements is awkward and the compiler is--properly--complaining that this code would cause problems if count was less than 0. Instead change the whole function to return count == 0; for isEmpty and return count == SIZE; for isFull – scohe001 Jul 30 '14 at 16:58
  • 1
    If size is a compile-time constant, why allocate the array dynamically? – Neil Kirk Jul 30 '14 at 17:00
  • It is a fact that an array never can have less than 0 elements. So I would declare count as unsigned int. Simple and direct. – Nilo Paim Jul 30 '14 at 17:09
  • There is no count < 0, Chris – Terry Light Jul 30 '14 at 18:09
5
my_String.Is_Full();

if (true)
{
    cout << "It is full" << endl;
}

This is not correct : you call Is_Full(), it return false but you don't use the return value. Then you check if true is true, and it is, obviously.

You should do instead:

if (my_String.Is_Full())
{
    cout << "It is full" << endl;
}
else
{
    ...
}

About the compiler warning, they are cases where your function doesn't return at all, you should either replace your 'else if' with a simple else, or add a return statement outside of your conditional scope.

|improve this answer|||||
  • true; is perfectly valid syntax in C++. – scohe001 Jul 30 '14 at 17:00
2

You don't have all the cases handled.

template <class New_Type>
bool Array_Class<New_Type>::Is_Full()
{
    if (count == SIZE)
    {
        return true;
    }
    else if (count < SIZE)
    {
        return false;
    }

}

But what about count > SIZE

You might want to change it to if ( count >= SIZE ) or add an else block

You have a similar issue in this block

bool Array_Class<New_Type>::Is_Empty()
{
    if (count == 0)
    {
        return true;
    }
    else if (count > 0)
    {
        return false;
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • His Is_Full function should consist of a single return, and nothing else: return count >= SIZE;, for example. All these if to return true or false is just obfuscating verbiage. – James Kanze Jul 30 '14 at 17:40
  • That can't happen, because the "count" automatically stops when in template void Array_Class<New_Type>::Add(New_Type item). So count can never go beyond 5 – Terry Light Jul 30 '14 at 17:44

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