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I am re-writing VB code in C# and have the below VB code:

Public Class IField
        Public SQLServerColumnName As String
        Public IKeysForColumn() As String
        Public PipeStrings As Dictionary(Of String, String())
        Public Cleansing As String()

    Public Sub New(ByVal columnName As String, ByVal keys() As String)
        Me.SQLServerColumnName = columnName
        Me.IKeysForColumn = keys
        Me.PipeStrings = New Dictionary(Of String, String())
        Me.Cleansing = New String() {""}
    End Sub

    Public Sub New(ByVal columnName As String, ByVal keys() As String, ByVal Cleansing() As String)
        Me.SQLServerColumnName = columnName
        Me.IKeysForColumn = keys
        Me.PipeStrings = New Dictionary(Of String, String())
        Me.Cleansing = Cleansing
    End Sub
End Class

Based on some reading and research, I came up with the below C# comparable code, which may or may not be accurate. From what I can tell, the Public Sub New in VB is the equivalent of void in C#, yet neither in VB have names and C# doesn't allow voids to be unnamed.

public class IField
    {
        public string SqlServerColumnName;
        public string[] IKeysForColumn;
        public Dictionary<string, string[]> PipeStrings;
        public string[] cleansing;

        void b(string columnName, string[] keys)
        {
            this.SqlServerColumnName = columnName;
            this.IKeysForColumn = keys;
            this.PipeStrings = new Dictionary<string,string[]>();
            this.cleansing = new string[] {""};
        }

        void bb(string columnName, string[] keys, string[] cleansing)
        {
            this.SqlServerColumnName = columnName;
            this.IKeysForColumn = keys;
            this.PipeStrings = new Dictionary<string,string[]>();
            this.cleansing = new string[] {""};
        }
    }

Is there a way to leave out the names b and bb?

  • Not too knowledgeable on VB, but those look like constructors. So they should have the same name as the class. – Nick Banks Jul 30 '14 at 17:26
  • 5
    As an aside, you really should not name a class IField - this suggests that it is an interface when it is not. – J... Jul 30 '14 at 17:30
10

It looks like you're trying to write constructors, in which case your method headers should be

public IField(string columnName, string[] keys)

and

public IField(string columnName, string[] keys, string[] cleansing)
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To add some additional clarification, you state :

From what I can tell, the Public Sub New in VB is the equivalent of void in C#

This is not true. In VB you have two types of methods - Sub and Function. A Sub does not return a value, a Function does return a value. In C#, all methods are declared with their return type preceding the method name. void simply means that the method does not return a value (ie: void = Sub). For example :

Private Sub DoSomething
     ' Do something...' 
End Sub

becomes

private void DoSomething()
{
     //Do something...
}

Whereas a function :

Private Function GetSomething As Double
    Return 1.2345
End Function

becomes

private double GetSomething()
{
    return 1.2345;
}

For the special case of constructors, VB.NET uses the reserved name New, which implicitly returns a newly constructed instance of the class. This is the one case where Public Sub New does not translate to public void New(); C# instead fuses the return type and method name into one (per Andrew's answer). This syntax only applies to constructors.

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Not knowing VB, I would assume that Public Sub New is the syntax for a constructor. In that case, void b and void bb should instead be public IField.

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