30

I was looking at a perf benchmark of Object.keys + forEach vs for-in with normal objects.

This benchmark shows that Object.keys + forEach is 62% slower than the for-in approach. But what if you don't want to get the inherited properties? for-in includes all non-native inherited objects, so we'll have to use hasOwnProperty to check.

I tried to make another benchmark here doing exactly that. But now the for-in approach is 41% slower than Object.keys + forEach.


update

The above test was done in Chrome. Tested it again but with Safari and I'm getting different results: Object.keys(..).forEach(..) 34% slower, odd.

Note: The reason I'm benchmarking is to check how it is with Node.js.

Questions:

  • Are the jsperf result for Chrome considerable for Node.js?
  • What happened, how come a single conditional made the for-in approach 41% slower than Object.keys + forEach in Chrome?
  • Can you highlight the question(s) here? There seems to be quite a few to be answered. – CodingIntrigue Jul 31 '14 at 7:17
  • Updated my question. Sorry about the confusion. – majidarif Jul 31 '14 at 7:18
34

node.js uses V8, although I guess it's not the same as the current version in Chrome, but I guess it's a good indicator of node's performances on the subject.

Secondarily, you're using forEach, which is quite handy when developing but adds a callback for every iteration, and that's a (relatively) lenghty task. So, if you're interested in performances, why don't you just use a normal for loop?

for (var i = 0, keys = Object.keys(object); i < keys.length; i++) {
    // ...
}

This yields the best performances you can get, solving your speed problems in Safari too.

In short: it's not the conditional, it's the call to hasOwnProperty that makes a difference. You're doing a function call at every iteration, so that's why for...in becomes slower.

  • Yes, but the second test I did. Shows that forEach is a lot faster. Considering for-in should not include inherited properties. – majidarif Jul 31 '14 at 7:26
  • Added this snippet to the benchmark. It holds the top place against the 2. Thanks. – majidarif Jul 31 '14 at 7:35
  • By the way, having Object.keys() called in condition section of loop is not good idea because it will be called in each iteration. – AskarovBeknar Aug 19 '16 at 11:24
  • @AskarovBeknar I don't know if you're referring to my snippet above, but that's not what happened because of that precise reason. – MaxArt Aug 19 '16 at 17:38
  • Ah. yeah sorry. it is actually in initialization part. Then it is completely right. And you are right, using for loop instead of foreach will speed up execution, because it does not create a closure every iteration and you can break from it. – AskarovBeknar Aug 20 '16 at 11:58
18

Just to note that:

var keys = Object.keys(obj), i = keys.length;

while(--i) {
   //
}

will not run for the index 0 and then you'll miss one of your attributes.

This in an array like ["a","b","c","d"] will run only d,c,b, and you'll miss the "a" 'cause index is 0 and 0 is false.

You need to decrement after the while check:

var keys = Object.keys(obj), i = keys.length;

while(i--) {
   //
}
2

I was interested in this today as well, but mostly because I don't like having to test with hasOwnProperty to pass the default lint when I already know my objects are clean (as they've been created from object literals). Anyway, I expanded a little on the answer by @styonsk to include a better output and to run multiple tests and return the output.

Conclusion: It's complicated for node. The best time looks like using Object.keys() with either a numerical for loop or a while loop on nodejs v4.6.1. On v4.6.1, the forIn loop with hasOwnProperty is the slowest method. However, on node v6.9.1 it is the fastest, but it is still slower than both Object.keys() iterators on v4.6.1.

Notes: This was run on a late 2013 MacBook Pro with 16GB ram and a 2.4Ghz i5 processor. Every test pegged 100% of a single cpu for the duration of the test and had an average rss of about 500MB and peaked at 1GB of rss. Hope this helps someone.

Here are my results running against nodejs v6.9.1 and v4.6.1 with large objects (10^6 properties) and small objects(50 properties)

Node v4.6.1 with large object 10^6 properties

testObjKeyWhileDecrement Test Count: 100 Total Time: 57595 ms Average Time: 575.95 ms

testObjKeyForLoop Test Count: 100 Total Time: 54885 ms Average Time: 548.85 ms

testForInLoop Test Count: 100 Total Time: 86448 ms Average Time: 864.48 ms

Node v4.6.1 with small object 50 properties

testObjKeyWhileDecrement Test Count: 1000 Total Time: 4 ms Average Time: 0.004 ms

testObjKeyForLoop Test Count: 1000 Total Time: 4 ms Average Time: 0.004 ms

testForInLoop Test Count: 1000 Total Time: 14 ms Average Time: 0.014 ms

Node v6.9.1 with large object 10^6 properties

testObjKeyWhileDecrement Test Count: 100 Total Time: 94252 ms Average Time: 942.52 ms

testObjKeyForLoop Test Count: 100 Total Time: 92342 ms Average Time: 923.42 ms

testForInLoop Test Count: 100 Total Time: 72981 ms Average Time: 729.81 ms

Node v4.6.1 with small object 50 properties

testObjKeyWhileDecrement Test Count: 1000 Total Time: 8 ms Average Time: 0.008 ms

testObjKeyForLoop Test Count: 1000 Total Time: 10 ms Average Time: 0.01 ms

testForInLoop Test Count: 1000 Total Time: 13 ms Average Time: 0.013 ms

And following is the code I ran:

//Helper functions
function work(value) {
  //do some work on this value
}

function createTestObj(count) {
  var obj = {}
  while (count--) {
    obj["key" + count] = "test";
  }
  return obj;
}

function runOnce(func, obj) {
  var start = Date.now();
  func(obj);
  return Date.now() - start;
}

function testTimer(name, func, obj, count) {
  count = count || 100;
  var times = [];
  var i = count;
  var total;
  var avg;

  while (i--) {
    times.push(runOnce(func, obj));
  }

  total = times.reduce(function (a, b) { return a + b });
  avg = total / count;

  console.log(name);
  console.log('Test Count: ' + count);
  console.log('Total Time: ' + total);
  console.log('Average Time: ' + avg);
  console.log('');
}

//Tests
function testObjKeyWhileDecrement(obj) {
  var keys = Object.keys(obj);
  var i = keys.length;
  while (i--) {
    work(obj[keys[i]]);
  }
}

function testObjKeyForLoop(obj) {
  var keys = Object.keys(obj);
  var len = keys.length;
  var i;
  for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    work(obj[keys[i]]);
  }
}

function testForInLoop(obj) {
  for (key in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      work(obj[key]);
    }
  }
}

//Run the Tests
var data = createTestObj(50)
testTimer('testObjKeyWhileDecrement', testObjKeyWhileDecrement, data, 1000);
testTimer('testObjKeyForLoop', testObjKeyForLoop, data, 1000);
testTimer('testForInLoop', testForInLoop, data, 1000);
  • 1
    I just tested Object.keys(obj).forEach(work) and it fits squarely between forIn and Object.keys with numerical for and while loops. – baetheus Nov 25 '16 at 5:12
  • 1
    I put together a jsperf for this here: jsperf.com/object-property-iteration – baetheus Nov 25 '16 at 5:41
1

For anyone viewing still concerned with iterating object properties in JS, the absolute fastest method is:

var keys = Object.keys(obj), i = keys.length;

while(--i) {
   //
}

http://jsperf.com/object-keys-foreach-vs-for-in-hasownproperty/8

You can save a bit on large objects by not having to recompute the length value of the key array (mostly negligible with modern browser optimizations), which is also true for the case of a simple for loop. The decremented while loop is still faster than the for loop or the incremented while loop with length upper limit comparison, by a fair margin.

0

I tested this today. For my purposes, getting the Object keys and then doing a plain old for loop was faster than doing a decrementing while or a for in loop. Feel free to change this template to test the different loops out for your individual case:

//Helper functions
function work(value) {
  //do some work on this value
}

function createTestObj(count) {
  var obj = {}
  while (count--) {
    obj["key" + count] = "test";
  }
  return obj;
}

//Tests
function test_ObjKeyWhileDecrement(obj) {
  console.log("Time Started: ", new Date().getTime());
  var keys = Object.keys(obj),
    i = keys.length;
  while (i--) {
    work(obj[keys[i]]);
  }
  console.log("Time Finished: ", new Date().getTime());
}

function test_ObjKeyForLoop(obj) {
  console.log("Time Started: ", new Date().getTime());
  for (var i = 0, keys = Object.keys(obj); i < keys.length; i++) {
    work(obj[keys[i]]);
  }
  console.log("Time Finished: ", new Date().getTime());
}

function test_ForInLoop(obj) {
  console.log("Time Started: ", new Date().getTime());
  for (key in obj) {
    work(obj[key]);
  }
  console.log("Time Finished: ", new Date().getTime());
}

//Run the Tests
var data = createTestObj(1000 * 100)
console.log("Test Obj Key While Decrement Loop")
test_ObjKeyWhileDecrement(data);
console.log("Test Obj Key For Loop")
test_ObjKeyForLoop(data);
console.log("Test For In Loop")
test_ForInLoop(data);

You may want to run that in your actual environment to test instead of in a jsfiddle. Try multiple browsers also.

  • 1
    You should use console.time and console.timeEnd for such cases. – Rajesh Oct 14 '16 at 7:46
0

And for the ES6 fans out there, looks like

Object.keys(obj).reduce((a,k) => {a += obj[k]; return a}, res)

is by far the fastest.

https://jsperf.com/for-in-vs-for-of-keys-vs-keys-reduce

  • 2018: keys-reduce is only 0.5% faster on V8, but 2% slower on FireFox. – dube Aug 17 '18 at 13:35

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