4

I have a CSV file containing more than 200'000 rows. I need to save it to MongoDB.

If I try a for loop, Node will run out of memory.

fs.readFile('data.txt', function(err, data) {
  if (err) throw err;

  data.split('\n');

  for (var i = 0; i < data.length, i += 1) {
    var row = data[i].split(',');

    var obj = { /* The object to save */ }

    var entry = new Entry(obj);
    entry.save(function(err) {
      if (err) throw err;
    }
  } 
}

How can I avoid running out of memony?

  • Do you absolutely have to do this with mongoose? Mongo has a csv import option... – Alex Jul 31 '14 at 9:34
  • @Alex the problem is, that I need to apply some changes to the structure and data meamnwhile – Alberto Jul 31 '14 at 9:36
  • Ok, you could try the mongoose writeable streams - npmjs.org/package/mongoose-write-stream – Alex Jul 31 '14 at 9:38
  • That last comment would be useful in your question rather than a comment. Just for future reference. – Neil Lunn Jul 31 '14 at 9:38
  • possible duplicate of Read a file one line at a time in node.js? – Jay Kumar Jul 31 '14 at 9:43
9

Welcome to streaming. What you really want is an "evented stream" that processes your input "one chunk at a time", and of course ideally by a common delimiter such as the "newline" character you are currently using.

For really efficient stuff, you can add usage of MongoDB "Bulk API" inserts to make your loading as fast as possible without eating up all of the machine memory or CPU cycles.

Not advocating as there are various solutions available, but here is a listing that utilizes the line-input-stream package to make the "line terminator" part simple.

Schema definitions by "example" only:

var LineInputStream = require("line-input-stream"),
    fs = require("fs"),
    async = require("async"),
    mongoose = require("mongoose"),
    Schema = mongoose.Schema;

var entrySchema = new Schema({},{ strict: false })

var Entry = mongoose.model( "Schema", entrySchema );

var stream = LineInputStream(fs.createReadStream("data.txt",{ flags: "r" }));

stream.setDelimiter("\n");

mongoose.connection.on("open",function(err,conn) { 

    // lower level method, needs connection
    var bulk = Entry.collection.initializeOrderedBulkOp();
    var counter = 0;

    stream.on("error",function(err) {
        console.log(err); // or otherwise deal with it
    });

    stream.on("line",function(line) {

        async.series(
            [
                function(callback) {
                    var row = line.split(",");     // split the lines on delimiter
                    var obj = {};             
                    // other manipulation

                    bulk.insert(obj);  // Bulk is okay if you don't need schema
                                       // defaults. Or can just set them.

                    counter++;

                    if ( counter % 1000 == 0 ) {
                        stream.pause();
                        bulk.execute(function(err,result) {
                            if (err) callback(err);
                            // possibly do something with result
                            bulk = Entry.collection.initializeOrderedBulkOp();
                            stream.resume();
                            callback();
                        });
                    } else {
                        callback();
                    }
               }
           ],
           function (err) {
               // each iteration is done
           }
       );

    });

    stream.on("end",function() {

        if ( counter % 1000 != 0 )
            bulk.execute(function(err,result) {
                if (err) throw err;   // or something
                // maybe look at result
            });
    });

});

So generally the "stream" interface there "breaks the input down" in order to process "one line at a time". That stops you from loading everything at once.

The main parts are the "Bulk Operations API" from MongoDB. This allows you to "queue up" many operations at a time before actually sending to the server. So in this case with the use of a "modulo", writes are only sent per 1000 entries processed. You can really do anything up to the 16MB BSON limit, but keep it manageable.

In addition to the operations being processed in bulk, there is an additional "limiter" in place from the async library. It's not really required, but this ensures that essentially no more than the "modulo limit" of documents are in process at any time. The general batch "inserts" come at no IO cost other than memory, but the "execute" calls mean IO is processing. So we wait rather than queuing up more things.

There are surely better solutions you can find for "stream processing" CSV type data which this appears to be. But in general this gives you the concepts to how to do this in a memory efficient manner without eating CPU cycles as well.

  • How async.series ensures no more than the "modulo limit" of documents are in process at any time? What I see here is that objects gets queued up and written to db in 1000's. And if the next 1000 objects gets ready before the previous bulk.execute() completes, it will fire another bulk.execute(). Am I missing something here? – Jay Kumar Jul 31 '14 at 11:16
  • @JayyVis Apparently yes you are missing something. As I said the "series" is a little contrived, but the actual execution has a point. With the modulo you cannot "queue" more than 1000 operations at a time. The "series" callback makes sure of this as the "inner" execution requires that there is completion. This is either the "batch insert" or it is the actual "execute" that effectively drains the queue. This is generally the pattern you want for avoiding memory consumption. Plus everything processes on event ticks. – Neil Lunn Jul 31 '14 at 11:25
  • @JayyVis No you do not. The "async" point is putting a "hold" on further processing until that completes. So this can be handled a a different level. Maybe you should try the code first before posting a "constructive criticism" – Neil Lunn Jul 31 '14 at 12:01
  • Indeed @JayKumar is right on his answer. The execute command is asynchronous and more lines events could come before the execute operation finishes, ending up on using the same bulk object, which is executing. When the execution finishes and if there were any insert operations on the previous bulk object that were not there before starting the execution, all of those documents would get lost when starting a new bulk object. And this assuming that inserting documents into a bulk object that is executing wouldn't throw any exceptions. – Gian Franco Zabarino Sep 10 '16 at 21:20
7

The accepted answer is great and attempted to cover all the important aspects of this problem.

  1. Reading the CSV file as a stream of lines
  2. Writing the documents in batches to MongoDB
  3. Synchronization between reading and writing

While it did well with first two aspects, the approach taken to address the synchronization using async.series() won't work as expected.

stream.on("line",function(line) {
    async.series(
        [
            function(callback) {
                var row = line.split(",");     // split the lines on delimiter
                var obj = {};             
                // other manipulation

                bulk.insert(obj);  // Bulk is okay if you don't need schema
                                   // defaults. Or can just set them.

                counter++;

                if ( counter % 1000 == 0 ) {
                    bulk.execute(function(err,result) {
                        if (err) throw err;   // or do something
                        // possibly do something with result
                        bulk = Entry.collection.initializeOrderedBulkOp();
                        callback();
                    });
                } else {
                    callback();
                }
           }
       ],
       function (err) {
           // each iteration is done
       }
   );
});

Here bulk.execute() is a mongodb write operation and its an asynchronous IO call. This allows node.js to proceed with the event loop before bulk.execute() is done with its db writes and calls back.

So it may go on to receive more 'line' events from the stream and queue more documents bulk.insert(obj) and can hit next modulo to trigger bulk.execute() again.

Lets have a look at this example.

var async = require('async');

var bulk = {
    execute: function(callback) {
        setTimeout(callback, 1000);
    }
};

async.series(
    [
       function (callback) {
           bulk.execute(function() {
              console.log('completed bulk.execute');
              callback(); 
           });
       },
    ], 
    function(err) {

    }
);

console.log("!!! proceeding to read more from stream");

It's output

!!! proceeding to read more from stream
completed bulk.execute

To really ensure that we are processing one batch of N documents at any given time, we need to enforce flow control on the file stream using stream.pause() & stream.resume()

var LineInputStream = require("line-input-stream"),
    fs = require("fs"),
    mongoose = require("mongoose"),
    Schema = mongoose.Schema;

var entrySchema = new Schema({},{ strict: false });
var Entry = mongoose.model( "Entry", entrySchema );

var stream = LineInputStream(fs.createReadStream("data.txt",{ flags: "r" }));

stream.setDelimiter("\n");

mongoose.connection.on("open",function(err,conn) { 

    // lower level method, needs connection
    var bulk = Entry.collection.initializeOrderedBulkOp();
    var counter = 0;

    stream.on("error",function(err) {
        console.log(err); // or otherwise deal with it
    });

    stream.on("line",function(line) {
        var row = line.split(",");     // split the lines on delimiter
        var obj = {};             
        // other manipulation

        bulk.insert(obj);  // Bulk is okay if you don't need schema
                           // defaults. Or can just set them.

        counter++;

        if ( counter % 1000 === 0 ) {
            stream.pause(); //lets stop reading from file until we finish writing this batch to db

            bulk.execute(function(err,result) {
                if (err) throw err;   // or do something
                // possibly do something with result
                bulk = Entry.collection.initializeOrderedBulkOp();

                stream.resume(); //continue to read from file
            });
        }
    });

    stream.on("end",function() {
        if ( counter % 1000 != 0 ) {
            bulk.execute(function(err,result) {
                if (err) throw err;   // or something
                // maybe look at result
            });
        }
    });

});

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