1

I have a table which keeps the status and created_timestamp corresponding to a process_id. One row is inserted as soon as the process status changes. So, there are as many rows with same process_id as there are statuses associated with it. I want to create another table/view using this data which has one single row corresponding to a process_id, its current status and its previous status. I need to make a Informatica job for this, but a SQL query will be just as helpful.
Sample Input:

Process_id | Status     | Created 
         1 | In_queue   | 2014-08-01 00:01:01 
         1 | Started    | 2014-08-01 01:03:01 
         1 | In_process | 2014-08-01 01:50:20 
         1 | Complete   | 2014-08-01 03:10:20 

Sample Output: 
Process_id | Previous_status | Current_status | Updated 
         1 | In_process      | Complete       | 2014-08-01 03:10:20
1
SELECT Process_id, Previous_status, Current_status, Updated 
FROM (
    SELECT
    Process_id, 
    Status AS Current_status, 
    Created AS Updated,
    @prev_state AS Previous_status,
    @prev_state := Status 
    FROM
    your_table t
    , (select @prev_state := null) var_init
    WHERE Process_id = 1
    ORDER BY Created
) sq

UPDATE:

To do it for all Process_ids and just get the latest record for each Process_id you can use this:

SELECT sq.Process_id, sq.Previous_status, sq.Current_status, sq.Updated 
FROM (
    SELECT
    Process_id, 
    Status AS Current_status, 
    Created AS Updated,
    @prev_state := if(@prev_process != Process_id, null, @prev_state),
    @prev_state AS Previous_status,
    @prev_state := Status,
    @prev_process := Process_id
    FROM
    your_table t
    , (select @prev_state := null, @prev_process := null) var_init
    ORDER BY Process_id, Created
) sq
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT Process_id, MAX(Created) AS max_created
    FROM your_table
    GROUP BY Process_id
) max_c
ON sq.Process_id = max_c.Process_id AND sq.Updated = max_c.max_created
  • This works perfectly. Since, the data volume is significant, I'd rather go with this method only. Two questions though: 1. How can we do it for all process_ids instead of mentioning only 1? 2. I have one more columns like status..... Update on that also need to be captured. Is it possible in the same query? – Drunk Knight Aug 1 '14 at 9:17
  • Updated my answer to reflect your first question. For second question just add more variables as needed. – fancyPants Aug 1 '14 at 9:32
  • Hey... its for process_id=1 only... you can slightly edit the filter to correct it. Other than that, it's the right word for this solution is "cool" :) Thanks a lot.! – Drunk Knight Aug 1 '14 at 9:45
  • Yes, copy&paste error. I also added Process_id to the ORDER BY clause. This is important! – fancyPants Aug 1 '14 at 9:48
0

Performance aside, here's how I'd do it...

SELECT a.process_id
     , a.status
     , a.created
     , b.status prev_status
     , b.created prev_created
  FROM 
     ( SELECT x.*
            , COUNT(*) rank
         FROM my_table x
         JOIN my_table y
           ON y.process_id = x.process_id
          AND y.created >= x.created
        GROUP
           BY x.process_id
            , x.created
     ) a
  LEFT
  JOIN
     ( SELECT x.*
            , COUNT(*) rank
         FROM my_table x
         JOIN my_table y
           ON y.process_id = x.process_id
          AND y.created >= x.created
        GROUP
           BY x.process_id
            , x.created
     ) b
    ON b.process_id = a.process_id
 WHERE b.rank = a.rank + 1
   AND a.rank = 1;

On a larger dataset, I'd probably go with a more fancyPantsy solution

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