62

I have a variable that initialized as:

lazy var aClient:Clinet = {
    var _aClient = Clinet(ClinetSession.shared())
    _aClient.delegate = self
    return _aClient
}()

The problem is, at some point, I need to reset this aClient variable so it can initialize again when the ClinetSession.shared() changed. But if I set the class to optional Clinet?, LLVM will give me an error when I try to set it to nil. If I just reset it somewhere in the code using aClient = Clinet(ClinetSession.shared()), it will end up with EXEC_BAD_ACCESS.

Is there a way that can use lazy and being allowed to reset itself?

  • Just because I stumbled reading the code: is it Clinet and ClinetSession on purpose or is it a typo? – luk2302 May 27 '16 at 17:10
  • @luk2302 typo, but guess it wasn't stop people from solving my question after all. :) – Cai Sep 12 '17 at 9:20
84

lazy is explicitly for one-time only initialization. The model you want to adopt is probably just an initialize-on-demand model:

var aClient:Client {
    if(_aClient == nil) {
        _aClient = Client(ClientSession.shared())
    }
    return _aClient!
}

var _aClient:Client?

Now whenever _aClient is nil, it will be initialized and returned. It can be reinitialized by setting _aClient = nil

  • This is clever! BTW I think we might needs to use self._aClient in the get{}. Sometimes Swift compiler can find a var in some cases if the self. is missing. – Cai Aug 1 '14 at 12:30
  • 6
    I had hoped for something better in Swift 2. What you really want is a var with a setter that only allows setting to nil, and getter code that is only called when the property is nil. Like var aClient:Client { setnil; getnil { aClient = Client (ClientSession.shared ()) } } getnil would be called if you get the variable after setting it to nil. – gnasher729 Jul 1 '15 at 13:19
  • 1
    @gnasher729 Hooray for Swift 3! See my answer for exactly that :) – Ben Leggiero Nov 30 '16 at 18:25
  • Nice Answer...This method worked nicely for setting the GMSCircle which I created as Lazy var initially..Thank you! – BharathRao Aug 13 at 12:20
42

Because the behavior of lazy changed in Swift 4, I wrote a few structs that give very specific behavior, which should never change between language versions. I put these on GitHub, under the BH-0-PD license: https://github.com/RougeWare/Swift-Lazy-Patterns

ResettableLazy

Here is the one relevant to this question, which gives you a way to lazily-initialize a value, cache that value, and destroy it so it can be lazily-reinitialized later.

Note that this requires Swift 5.1! For the Swift 4 version, see version 1.1.1 of that repo.

The simple usage of this is very straightforward:

@ResettableLazy
var myLazyString = "Hello, lazy!"

print(myLazyString) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value "Hello, lazy!"
print(myLazyString) // Just returns the value "Hello, lazy!"

_myLazyString.clear()
print(myLazyString) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value "Hello, lazy!"
print(myLazyString) // Just returns the value "Hello, lazy!"

myLazyString = "Overwritten"
print(myLazyString) // Just returns the value "Overwritten"
_myLazyString.clear()
print(myLazyString.wrappedValue) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value  "Hello, lazy!"

This will print:

Hello, lazy!
Hello, lazy!
Hello, lazy!
Hello, lazy!
Overwritten
Hello, lazy!

If you have complex initializer logic, you can pass that to the property wrapper:

func makeLazyString() -> String {
    print("Initializer side-effect")
    return "Hello, lazy!"
}

@ResettableLazy(initializer: makeLazyString)
var myLazyString: String

print(myLazyString) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value "Hello, lazy!"
print(myLazyString) // Just returns the value "Hello, lazy!"

_myLazyString.clear()
print(myLazyString) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value "Hello, lazy!"
print(myLazyString) // Just returns the value "Hello, lazy!"

myLazyString = "Overwritten"
print(myLazyString) // Just returns the value "Overwritten"
_myLazyString.clear()
print(myLazyString.wrappedValue) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value  "Hello, lazy!"

You can also use it directly (instaed of as a property wrapper):

var myLazyString = ResettableLazy<String>() {
    print("Initializer side-effect")
    return "Hello, lazy!"
}

print(myLazyString.wrappedValue) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value "Hello, lazy!"
print(myLazyString.wrappedValue) // Just returns the value "Hello, lazy!"

myLazyString.clear()
print(myLazyString.wrappedValue) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value "Hello, lazy!"
print(myLazyString.wrappedValue) // Just returns the value "Hello, lazy!"

myLazyString.wrappedValue = "Overwritten"
print(myLazyString.wrappedValue) // Just returns the value "Overwritten"
_myLazyString.clear()
print(myLazyString.wrappedValue) // Initializes, caches, and returns the value  "Hello, lazy!"

These will both print:

Initializer side-effect
Hello, lazy!
Hello, lazy!
Initializer side-effect
Hello, lazy!
Hello, lazy!
Overwritten
Initializer side-effect
Hello, lazy!

The below solution no longer works in Swift 4 and newer!

Instead, I recommend you use one of the solutions listed above, or @PBosman's solution

The below behavior was a bug, described in Swift bug SR-5172 (which has been resolved as of 2017-07-14 with PR #10,911), and it's clear that this behavior was never intentional.

The solution for Swift 3 is below for historical reasons, but because it's a bug exploit that doesn't work in Swift 3.2+ I recommend you do not do this:


I'm not sure exactly when this was added, but as of Swift 3, you can simply make the property nil-able: lazy var aClient:Client! = { var _aClient = Client(ClinetSession.shared()) _aClient.delegate = self return _aClient }()
// ...
aClient = nil
Now, next time you call aClient after setting it to nil, it will be reinitialized. --- Note that, although it is now technically optional, every single time you try to read it, it is guaranteed to have a runtime value. That's why I use !, here, because it is always a safe call and will never be read as nil, but it can be set to nil.

  • 2
    IMHO, this is a cleaner way to achieve this than the accepted answer. – timgcarlson Dec 7 '16 at 19:09
  • 1
    +1 for the usage of !, however, if one were to utilize this pattern, every caller of this variable would still have to unwrap the Optional. E.g., print(aClient) // prints "Optional(Clinet)\n" – pxpgraphics Dec 14 '16 at 19:56
  • 1
    I just tried it in a playground this morning, uploaded here: gist.github.com/pxpgraphics/4cfb7e02b6be7a583bf5f8a3ccbcd29a So maybe this is related to the string interpolation :] – pxpgraphics Dec 14 '16 at 21:21
  • 1
    I think I accidentally used this bug exploit... Thought it was very odd that long standing code only recently began causing crashes (recently updated to Swift 4). Are there strong advantages to the solution you linked to in your edit vs the accepted solution? Accepted solution seems to fit my needs, the one you linked to seems overly complex and I don't see the advantage of it. – Jake T. May 2 '18 at 16:14
  • 1
    @Ben Leggiero I appreciate the endorsement :) although, as I mentioned in my answer, I'm not totally happy with my version. I'd be interested to see what you got if you'd be willing to share it? – Phlippie Bosman May 3 '18 at 6:35
6

EDIT: As per Ben Leggiero's answer, lazy vars can be nilable in Swift 3. EDIT 2: Seems like nilable lazy vars are no more.

Very late to the party, and not even sure if this will be relevant in Swift 3, but here goes. David's answer is good, but if you want to create many lazy nil-able vars, you will have to write a pretty hefty block of code. I'm trying to create an ADT that encapsulates this behaviour. Here's what I've got so far:

struct ClearableLazy<T> {
    private var t: T!
    private var constructor: () -> T
    init(_ constructor: () -> T) {
        self.constructor = constructor
    }
    mutating func get() -> T {
        if t == nil {
            t = constructor()
        }
        return t
    }
    mutating func clear() { t = nil }
}

You would then declare and use properties like this:

var aClient = ClearableLazy(Client.init)
aClient.get().delegate = self
aClient.clear()

There are things I don't like about this yet, but don't know how to improve:

  • You have to pass a constructor to the initializer, which looks ugly. It has the advantage, though, that you can specify exactly how new objects are to be created.
  • Calling get() on a property every time you want to use it is terrible. It would be slightly better if this was a computed property, not a function, but computed properties cannot be mutating.
  • To eliminate the need to call get(), you have to extend every type you want to use this for with initializers for ClearableLazy.

If someone feels like picking it up from here, that would be awesome.

  • 1
    This is essentially what I do in Swift 4, now – Ben Leggiero Jul 10 '17 at 13:34
3

This allows setting the property to nil to force reinitialization:

private var _recordedFileURL: NSURL!

/// Location of the recorded file
private var recordedFileURL: NSURL! {
    if _recordedFileURL == nil {
        let file = "recording\(arc4random()).caf"
        let url = NSURL(fileURLWithPath: NSTemporaryDirectory()).URLByAppendingPathComponent(file)
        NSLog("FDSoundActivatedRecorder opened recording file: %@", url)
        _recordedFileURL = url
    }
    return _recordedFileURL
}
1

There are some good answers here.
Resetting a lazy var is indeed, desirable in a lot of cases.

I think, you can also define a closure to create client and reset lazy var with this closure. Something like this:

class ClientSession {
    class func shared() -> ClientSession {
        return ClientSession()
    }
}

class Client {
    let session:ClientSession
    init(_ session:ClientSession) {
        self.session = session
    }
}

class Test {
    private let createClient = {()->(Client) in
        var _aClient = Client(ClientSession.shared())
        print("creating client")
        return _aClient
    }

    lazy var aClient:Client = createClient()
    func resetClient() {
        self.aClient = createClient()
    }
}

let test = Test()
test.aClient // creating client
test.aClient

// reset client
test.resetClient() // creating client
test.aClient
0

If the objective is to re-initialize a lazy property but not necessarily set it to nil, Building from Phlippie Bosman and Ben Leggiero, here is something that avoids conditional checks every time the value is read:

public struct RLazy<T> {
    public var value: T
    private var block: () -> T
    public init(_ block: @escaping () -> T) {
        self.block = block
        self.value = block()
    }
    public mutating func reset() {
        value = block()
    }
}

To test:

var prefix = "a"
var test = RLazy { () -> String in
    return "\(prefix)b"
}

test.value         // "ab"
test.value = "c"   // Changing value
test.value         // "c"
prefix = "d"
test.reset()       // Resetting value by executing block again
test.value         // "db"
0

Swift 5.1:

class Game {
    private var _scores: [Double]? = nil

    var scores: [Double] {
        if _scores == nil {
            print("Computing scores...")
            _scores = [Double](repeating: 0, count: 3)
        }
        return _scores!
    }

    func resetScores() {
        _scores = nil
    }
}

Here is how to use:

var game = Game()
print(game.scores)
print(game.scores)
game.resetScores()
print(game.scores)
print(game.scores)

This produces the following output:

Computing scores...
[0.0, 0.0, 0.0]
[0.0, 0.0, 0.0]
Computing scores...
[0.0, 0.0, 0.0]
[0.0, 0.0, 0.0]

Swift 5.1 and Property Wrapper

@propertyWrapper
class Cached<Value: Codable> : Codable {
    var cachedValue: Value?
    var setter: (() -> Value)?

    // Remove if you don't need your Value to be Codable    
    enum CodingKeys: String, CodingKey {
        case cachedValue
    }

    init(setter: @escaping () -> Value) {
        self.setter = setter
    }

    var wrappedValue: Value {
        get {
            if cachedValue == nil {
                cachedValue = setter!()
            }
            return cachedValue!
        }
        set { cachedValue = nil }
    }

}

class Game {
    @Cached(setter: {
        print("Computing scores...")
        return [Double](repeating: 0, count: 3)
    })
    var scores: [Double]
}

We reset the cache by setting it to any value:

var game = Game()
print(game.scores)
print(game.scores)
game.scores = []
print(game.scores)
print(game.scores)
  • How does this improve over the accepted answer? – Roland Weber Jul 21 at 14:45
  • Look at the property wrapper alternative. The syntax is now much cleaner. – caram Jul 21 at 17:15

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