4

I have a problem understanding the output of the code. Any explanation please...

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
     int x=2,y=5;
     x*=y+1;
     printf("%d",x);
}

The output is as 12. But as per my understanding x*=y+1;is x=x*y+1; but as per operator precedence x*y should be evaluated followed by adding 1 so it should be 10+1=11. But it is 12 — can anyone explain please?

8
  • which compiler r u using ? Use GCC. – Aashu Aug 1 '14 at 6:05
  • 4
    It's int main(void), not void main(). – Keith Thompson Aug 1 '14 at 6:06
  • @Aashu: It doesn't matter which compiler he's using. The code is behaving correctly, and no compiler will get this wrong. – Keith Thompson Aug 1 '14 at 6:06
  • 2
    @KeithThompson: except on Windows, and given the lack of newline at the end of the printf(), that's probably where it is being run. Yes, it should be int main(void), but MS does allow void main(). – Jonathan Leffler Aug 1 '14 at 6:07
  • 2
    This is a duplicate question; the difficulty is finding the (best) duplicate. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 1 '14 at 6:07
10

What's going on here is how the order of operations happens in programming.

Yes, if you were to have this equation x*y+1 it would be (x * y ) + 1 and result in eleven.

But in programming, the equation to the right of the = sign is solved for prior to being modified by the symbol proceeding the = sign. In this equation it is multiplied.

So x *= y + 1 is actually x = x * ( y + 1 ) which would be 12.
^ In this case, the asterisk(*) is multiplying the entire equation on the right hand side by x and then assigning that outcome to x.

1
  • 1
    +1 This should be the answer. Because it explain reason for evaluation order. – Jayesh Bhoi Aug 1 '14 at 6:14
13

It will be evaluated as

x = x * (y + 1);

so

x = 2 * ( 5 + 1 )
x = 12
1
  • Thank You for the Explanation – shashank Aug 1 '14 at 6:08
2

It is translated into : x = x*(y+1);

So very obviously it prints out 12.

0
1

Your understanding is correct but it's somthing like this:

x*=y+1;  =>  x = x * (y + 1);

Now apply BODMAS

3
  • BO=Brackets Open, D=Divide, M=Multiple, A=Add, S=Subtract. It's a order to solve the statements. – AmanVirdi Aug 1 '14 at 6:17
  • I doubt that programming languages follow bodmas everytime – nobalG Aug 1 '14 at 6:20
  • It helps the beginners like me, to0 understand in a simple way. – AmanVirdi Aug 1 '14 at 6:28
1

x *= y + 1 is x = x * (y + 1)

Operator + has higher precedence than operator *=.

1

x*=y; works like x=x*y; and here x*=(y+1) is getting expanded like x = x * (y + 1);

0

*= and similar ones are a type of C assignment operators, i.e. these operators are different from * and alike.

Now from C operator precedence, these operators have lowest precedence (higher than ,) hence y + 1 will be evaluated first, then *= will be evaluated and result will be assigned to x.

0

It evaluates as

x = x * (y + 1);

so

x = 2 * (5 + 1) = 12

Take a look at Operators order, you will see why in this case it is evaluated like that.

0

Here from operator procedure in c you can see

Addition/subtraction assignment has lower procedure than simply add operation.

so here

x*=y+1;

+ get executed first.

so

x = x * (6)

so x = 2 * 6

x = 12;

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