1506

I was looking for the fastest way to popcount large arrays of data. I encountered a very weird effect: Changing the loop variable from unsigned to uint64_t made the performance drop by 50% on my PC.

The Benchmark

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <x86intrin.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {

    using namespace std;
    if (argc != 2) {
       cerr << "usage: array_size in MB" << endl;
       return -1;
    }

    uint64_t size = atol(argv[1])<<20;
    uint64_t* buffer = new uint64_t[size/8];
    char* charbuffer = reinterpret_cast<char*>(buffer);
    for (unsigned i=0; i<size; ++i)
        charbuffer[i] = rand()%256;

    uint64_t count,duration;
    chrono::time_point<chrono::system_clock> startP,endP;
    {
        startP = chrono::system_clock::now();
        count = 0;
        for( unsigned k = 0; k < 10000; k++){
            // Tight unrolled loop with unsigned
            for (unsigned i=0; i<size/8; i+=4) {
                count += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i]);
                count += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+1]);
                count += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+2]);
                count += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+3]);
            }
        }
        endP = chrono::system_clock::now();
        duration = chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(endP-startP).count();
        cout << "unsigned\t" << count << '\t' << (duration/1.0E9) << " sec \t"
             << (10000.0*size)/(duration) << " GB/s" << endl;
    }
    {
        startP = chrono::system_clock::now();
        count=0;
        for( unsigned k = 0; k < 10000; k++){
            // Tight unrolled loop with uint64_t
            for (uint64_t i=0;i<size/8;i+=4) {
                count += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i]);
                count += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+1]);
                count += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+2]);
                count += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+3]);
            }
        }
        endP = chrono::system_clock::now();
        duration = chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(endP-startP).count();
        cout << "uint64_t\t"  << count << '\t' << (duration/1.0E9) << " sec \t"
             << (10000.0*size)/(duration) << " GB/s" << endl;
    }

    free(charbuffer);
}

As you see, we create a buffer of random data, with the size being x megabytes where x is read from the command line. Afterwards, we iterate over the buffer and use an unrolled version of the x86 popcount intrinsic to perform the popcount. To get a more precise result, we do the popcount 10,000 times. We measure the times for the popcount. In the upper case, the inner loop variable is unsigned, in the lower case, the inner loop variable is uint64_t. I thought that this should make no difference, but the opposite is the case.

The (absolutely crazy) results

I compile it like this (g++ version: Ubuntu 4.8.2-19ubuntu1):

g++ -O3 -march=native -std=c++11 test.cpp -o test

Here are the results on my Haswell Core i7-4770K CPU @ 3.50 GHz, running test 1 (so 1 MB random data):

  • unsigned 41959360000 0.401554 sec 26.113 GB/s
  • uint64_t 41959360000 0.759822 sec 13.8003 GB/s

As you see, the throughput of the uint64_t version is only half the one of the unsigned version! The problem seems to be that different assembly gets generated, but why? First, I thought of a compiler bug, so I tried clang++ (Ubuntu Clang version 3.4-1ubuntu3):

clang++ -O3 -march=native -std=c++11 teest.cpp -o test

Result: test 1

  • unsigned 41959360000 0.398293 sec 26.3267 GB/s
  • uint64_t 41959360000 0.680954 sec 15.3986 GB/s

So, it is almost the same result and is still strange. But now it gets super strange. I replace the buffer size that was read from input with a constant 1, so I change:

uint64_t size = atol(argv[1]) << 20;

to

uint64_t size = 1 << 20;

Thus, the compiler now knows the buffer size at compile time. Maybe it can add some optimizations! Here are the numbers for g++:

  • unsigned 41959360000 0.509156 sec 20.5944 GB/s
  • uint64_t 41959360000 0.508673 sec 20.6139 GB/s

Now, both versions are equally fast. However, the unsigned got even slower! It dropped from 26 to 20 GB/s, thus replacing a non-constant by a constant value lead to a deoptimization. Seriously, I have no clue what is going on here! But now to clang++ with the new version:

  • unsigned 41959360000 0.677009 sec 15.4884 GB/s
  • uint64_t 41959360000 0.676909 sec 15.4906 GB/s

Wait, what? Now, both versions dropped to the slow number of 15 GB/s. Thus, replacing a non-constant by a constant value even lead to slow code in both cases for Clang!

I asked a colleague with an Ivy Bridge CPU to compile my benchmark. He got similar results, so it does not seem to be Haswell. Because two compilers produce strange results here, it also does not seem to be a compiler bug. We do not have an AMD CPU here, so we could only test with Intel.

More madness, please!

Take the first example (the one with atol(argv[1])) and put a static before the variable, i.e.:

static uint64_t size=atol(argv[1])<<20;

Here are my results in g++:

  • unsigned 41959360000 0.396728 sec 26.4306 GB/s
  • uint64_t 41959360000 0.509484 sec 20.5811 GB/s

Yay, yet another alternative. We still have the fast 26 GB/s with u32, but we managed to get u64 at least from the 13 GB/s to the 20 GB/s version! On my collegue's PC, the u64 version became even faster than the u32 version, yielding the fastest result of all. Sadly, this only works for g++, clang++ does not seem to care about static.

My question

Can you explain these results? Especially:

  • How can there be such a difference between u32 and u64?
  • How can replacing a non-constant by a constant buffer size trigger less optimal code?
  • How can the insertion of the static keyword make the u64 loop faster? Even faster than the original code on my collegue's computer!

I know that optimization is a tricky territory, however, I never thought that such small changes can lead to a 100% difference in execution time and that small factors like a constant buffer size can again mix results totally. Of course, I always want to have the version that is able to popcount 26 GB/s. The only reliable way I can think of is copy paste the assembly for this case and use inline assembly. This is the only way I can get rid of compilers that seem to go mad on small changes. What do you think? Is there another way to reliably get the code with most performance?

The Disassembly

Here is the disassembly for the various results:

26 GB/s version from g++ / u32 / non-const bufsize:

0x400af8:
lea 0x1(%rdx),%eax
popcnt (%rbx,%rax,8),%r9
lea 0x2(%rdx),%edi
popcnt (%rbx,%rcx,8),%rax
lea 0x3(%rdx),%esi
add %r9,%rax
popcnt (%rbx,%rdi,8),%rcx
add $0x4,%edx
add %rcx,%rax
popcnt (%rbx,%rsi,8),%rcx
add %rcx,%rax
mov %edx,%ecx
add %rax,%r14
cmp %rbp,%rcx
jb 0x400af8

13 GB/s version from g++ / u64 / non-const bufsize:

0x400c00:
popcnt 0x8(%rbx,%rdx,8),%rcx
popcnt (%rbx,%rdx,8),%rax
add %rcx,%rax
popcnt 0x10(%rbx,%rdx,8),%rcx
add %rcx,%rax
popcnt 0x18(%rbx,%rdx,8),%rcx
add $0x4,%rdx
add %rcx,%rax
add %rax,%r12
cmp %rbp,%rdx
jb 0x400c00

15 GB/s version from clang++ / u64 / non-const bufsize:

0x400e50:
popcnt (%r15,%rcx,8),%rdx
add %rbx,%rdx
popcnt 0x8(%r15,%rcx,8),%rsi
add %rdx,%rsi
popcnt 0x10(%r15,%rcx,8),%rdx
add %rsi,%rdx
popcnt 0x18(%r15,%rcx,8),%rbx
add %rdx,%rbx
add $0x4,%rcx
cmp %rbp,%rcx
jb 0x400e50

20 GB/s version from g++ / u32&u64 / const bufsize:

0x400a68:
popcnt (%rbx,%rdx,1),%rax
popcnt 0x8(%rbx,%rdx,1),%rcx
add %rax,%rcx
popcnt 0x10(%rbx,%rdx,1),%rax
add %rax,%rcx
popcnt 0x18(%rbx,%rdx,1),%rsi
add $0x20,%rdx
add %rsi,%rcx
add %rcx,%rbp
cmp $0x100000,%rdx
jne 0x400a68

15 GB/s version from clang++ / u32&u64 / const bufsize:

0x400dd0:
popcnt (%r14,%rcx,8),%rdx
add %rbx,%rdx
popcnt 0x8(%r14,%rcx,8),%rsi
add %rdx,%rsi
popcnt 0x10(%r14,%rcx,8),%rdx
add %rsi,%rdx
popcnt 0x18(%r14,%rcx,8),%rbx
add %rdx,%rbx
add $0x4,%rcx
cmp $0x20000,%rcx
jb 0x400dd0

Interestingly, the fastest (26 GB/s) version is also the longest! It seems to be the only solution that uses lea. Some versions use jb to jump, others use jne. But apart from that, all versions seem to be comparable. I don't see where a 100% performance gap could originate from, but I am not too adept at deciphering assembly. The slowest (13 GB/s) version looks even very short and good. Can anyone explain this?

Lessons learned

No matter what the answer to this question will be; I have learned that in really hot loops every detail can matter, even details that do not seem to have any association to the hot code. I have never thought about what type to use for a loop variable, but as you see such a minor change can make a 100% difference! Even the storage type of a buffer can make a huge difference, as we saw with the insertion of the static keyword in front of the size variable! In the future, I will always test various alternatives on various compilers when writing really tight and hot loops that are crucial for system performance.

The interesting thing is also that the performance difference is still so high although I have already unrolled the loop four times. So even if you unroll, you can still get hit by major performance deviations. Quite interesting.

3

11 Answers 11

1625
+50

Culprit: False Data Dependency (and the compiler isn't even aware of it)

On Sandy/Ivy Bridge and Haswell processors, the instruction:

popcnt  src, dest

appears to have a false dependency on the destination register dest. Even though the instruction only writes to it, the instruction will wait until dest is ready before executing. This false dependency is (now) documented by Intel as erratum HSD146 (Haswell) and SKL029 (Skylake)

Skylake fixed this for lzcnt and tzcnt.
Cannon Lake (and Ice Lake) fixed this for popcnt.
bsf/bsr have a true output dependency: output unmodified for input=0. (But no way to take advantage of that with intrinsics - only AMD documents it and compilers don't expose it.)

(Yes, these instructions all run on the same execution unit).


This dependency doesn't just hold up the 4 popcnts from a single loop iteration. It can carry across loop iterations making it impossible for the processor to parallelize different loop iterations.

The unsigned vs. uint64_t and other tweaks don't directly affect the problem. But they influence the register allocator which assigns the registers to the variables.

In your case, the speeds are a direct result of what is stuck to the (false) dependency chain depending on what the register allocator decided to do.

  • 13 GB/s has a chain: popcnt-add-popcnt-popcnt → next iteration
  • 15 GB/s has a chain: popcnt-add-popcnt-add → next iteration
  • 20 GB/s has a chain: popcnt-popcnt → next iteration
  • 26 GB/s has a chain: popcnt-popcnt → next iteration

The difference between 20 GB/s and 26 GB/s seems to be a minor artifact of the indirect addressing. Either way, the processor starts to hit other bottlenecks once you reach this speed.


To test this, I used inline assembly to bypass the compiler and get exactly the assembly I want. I also split up the count variable to break all other dependencies that might mess with the benchmarks.

Here are the results:

Sandy Bridge Xeon @ 3.5 GHz: (full test code can be found at the bottom)

  • GCC 4.6.3: g++ popcnt.cpp -std=c++0x -O3 -save-temps -march=native
  • Ubuntu 12

Different Registers: 18.6195 GB/s

.L4:
    movq    (%rbx,%rax,8), %r8
    movq    8(%rbx,%rax,8), %r9
    movq    16(%rbx,%rax,8), %r10
    movq    24(%rbx,%rax,8), %r11
    addq    $4, %rax

    popcnt %r8, %r8
    add    %r8, %rdx
    popcnt %r9, %r9
    add    %r9, %rcx
    popcnt %r10, %r10
    add    %r10, %rdi
    popcnt %r11, %r11
    add    %r11, %rsi

    cmpq    $131072, %rax
    jne .L4

Same Register: 8.49272 GB/s

.L9:
    movq    (%rbx,%rdx,8), %r9
    movq    8(%rbx,%rdx,8), %r10
    movq    16(%rbx,%rdx,8), %r11
    movq    24(%rbx,%rdx,8), %rbp
    addq    $4, %rdx

    # This time reuse "rax" for all the popcnts.
    popcnt %r9, %rax
    add    %rax, %rcx
    popcnt %r10, %rax
    add    %rax, %rsi
    popcnt %r11, %rax
    add    %rax, %r8
    popcnt %rbp, %rax
    add    %rax, %rdi

    cmpq    $131072, %rdx
    jne .L9

Same Register with broken chain: 17.8869 GB/s

.L14:
    movq    (%rbx,%rdx,8), %r9
    movq    8(%rbx,%rdx,8), %r10
    movq    16(%rbx,%rdx,8), %r11
    movq    24(%rbx,%rdx,8), %rbp
    addq    $4, %rdx

    # Reuse "rax" for all the popcnts.
    xor    %rax, %rax    # Break the cross-iteration dependency by zeroing "rax".
    popcnt %r9, %rax
    add    %rax, %rcx
    popcnt %r10, %rax
    add    %rax, %rsi
    popcnt %r11, %rax
    add    %rax, %r8
    popcnt %rbp, %rax
    add    %rax, %rdi

    cmpq    $131072, %rdx
    jne .L14

So what went wrong with the compiler?

It seems that neither GCC nor Visual Studio are aware that popcnt has such a false dependency. Nevertheless, these false dependencies aren't uncommon. It's just a matter of whether the compiler is aware of it.

popcnt isn't exactly the most used instruction. So it's not really a surprise that a major compiler could miss something like this. There also appears to be no documentation anywhere that mentions this problem. If Intel doesn't disclose it, then nobody outside will know until someone runs into it by chance.

(Update: As of version 4.9.2, GCC is aware of this false-dependency and generates code to compensate it when optimizations are enabled. Major compilers from other vendors, including Clang, MSVC, and even Intel's own ICC are not yet aware of this microarchitectural erratum and will not emit code that compensates for it.)

Why does the CPU have such a false dependency?

We can speculate: it runs on the same execution unit as bsf / bsr which do have an output dependency. (How is POPCNT implemented in hardware?). For those instructions, Intel documents the integer result for input=0 as "undefined" (with ZF=1), but Intel hardware actually gives a stronger guarantee to avoid breaking old software: output unmodified. AMD documents this behaviour.

Presumably it was somehow inconvenient to make some uops for this execution unit dependent on the output but others not.

AMD processors do not appear to have this false dependency.


The full test code is below for reference:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <x86intrin.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {

   using namespace std;
   uint64_t size=1<<20;

   uint64_t* buffer = new uint64_t[size/8];
   char* charbuffer=reinterpret_cast<char*>(buffer);
   for (unsigned i=0;i<size;++i) charbuffer[i]=rand()%256;

   uint64_t count,duration;
   chrono::time_point<chrono::system_clock> startP,endP;
   {
      uint64_t c0 = 0;
      uint64_t c1 = 0;
      uint64_t c2 = 0;
      uint64_t c3 = 0;
      startP = chrono::system_clock::now();
      for( unsigned k = 0; k < 10000; k++){
         for (uint64_t i=0;i<size/8;i+=4) {
            uint64_t r0 = buffer[i + 0];
            uint64_t r1 = buffer[i + 1];
            uint64_t r2 = buffer[i + 2];
            uint64_t r3 = buffer[i + 3];
            __asm__(
                "popcnt %4, %4  \n\t"
                "add %4, %0     \n\t"
                "popcnt %5, %5  \n\t"
                "add %5, %1     \n\t"
                "popcnt %6, %6  \n\t"
                "add %6, %2     \n\t"
                "popcnt %7, %7  \n\t"
                "add %7, %3     \n\t"
                : "+r" (c0), "+r" (c1), "+r" (c2), "+r" (c3)
                : "r"  (r0), "r"  (r1), "r"  (r2), "r"  (r3)
            );
         }
      }
      count = c0 + c1 + c2 + c3;
      endP = chrono::system_clock::now();
      duration=chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(endP-startP).count();
      cout << "No Chain\t" << count << '\t' << (duration/1.0E9) << " sec \t"
            << (10000.0*size)/(duration) << " GB/s" << endl;
   }
   {
      uint64_t c0 = 0;
      uint64_t c1 = 0;
      uint64_t c2 = 0;
      uint64_t c3 = 0;
      startP = chrono::system_clock::now();
      for( unsigned k = 0; k < 10000; k++){
         for (uint64_t i=0;i<size/8;i+=4) {
            uint64_t r0 = buffer[i + 0];
            uint64_t r1 = buffer[i + 1];
            uint64_t r2 = buffer[i + 2];
            uint64_t r3 = buffer[i + 3];
            __asm__(
                "popcnt %4, %%rax   \n\t"
                "add %%rax, %0      \n\t"
                "popcnt %5, %%rax   \n\t"
                "add %%rax, %1      \n\t"
                "popcnt %6, %%rax   \n\t"
                "add %%rax, %2      \n\t"
                "popcnt %7, %%rax   \n\t"
                "add %%rax, %3      \n\t"
                : "+r" (c0), "+r" (c1), "+r" (c2), "+r" (c3)
                : "r"  (r0), "r"  (r1), "r"  (r2), "r"  (r3)
                : "rax"
            );
         }
      }
      count = c0 + c1 + c2 + c3;
      endP = chrono::system_clock::now();
      duration=chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(endP-startP).count();
      cout << "Chain 4   \t"  << count << '\t' << (duration/1.0E9) << " sec \t"
            << (10000.0*size)/(duration) << " GB/s" << endl;
   }
   {
      uint64_t c0 = 0;
      uint64_t c1 = 0;
      uint64_t c2 = 0;
      uint64_t c3 = 0;
      startP = chrono::system_clock::now();
      for( unsigned k = 0; k < 10000; k++){
         for (uint64_t i=0;i<size/8;i+=4) {
            uint64_t r0 = buffer[i + 0];
            uint64_t r1 = buffer[i + 1];
            uint64_t r2 = buffer[i + 2];
            uint64_t r3 = buffer[i + 3];
            __asm__(
                "xor %%rax, %%rax   \n\t"   // <--- Break the chain.
                "popcnt %4, %%rax   \n\t"
                "add %%rax, %0      \n\t"
                "popcnt %5, %%rax   \n\t"
                "add %%rax, %1      \n\t"
                "popcnt %6, %%rax   \n\t"
                "add %%rax, %2      \n\t"
                "popcnt %7, %%rax   \n\t"
                "add %%rax, %3      \n\t"
                : "+r" (c0), "+r" (c1), "+r" (c2), "+r" (c3)
                : "r"  (r0), "r"  (r1), "r"  (r2), "r"  (r3)
                : "rax"
            );
         }
      }
      count = c0 + c1 + c2 + c3;
      endP = chrono::system_clock::now();
      duration=chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(endP-startP).count();
      cout << "Broken Chain\t"  << count << '\t' << (duration/1.0E9) << " sec \t"
            << (10000.0*size)/(duration) << " GB/s" << endl;
   }

   free(charbuffer);
}

An equally interesting benchmark can be found here: http://pastebin.com/kbzgL8si
This benchmark varies the number of popcnts that are in the (false) dependency chain.

False Chain 0:  41959360000 0.57748 sec     18.1578 GB/s
False Chain 1:  41959360000 0.585398 sec    17.9122 GB/s
False Chain 2:  41959360000 0.645483 sec    16.2448 GB/s
False Chain 3:  41959360000 0.929718 sec    11.2784 GB/s
False Chain 4:  41959360000 1.23572 sec     8.48557 GB/s
12
  • 4
    Hi folks! Lots of past comments here; before leaving a new one, please review the archive. – Shog9 Dec 14 '16 at 22:07
  • 1
    @JustinL.it looks like this particular issue is fixed in Clang as of 7.0 – Dan M. Sep 25 '18 at 11:51
  • @PeterCordes I don't think it's the execution unit as much as it is the scheduler. It's the scheduler that tracks dependencies. And to do that, instructions are grouped into a number of "instruction classes" each of which are treated identically by the scheduler. Thus all the 3-cycle "slow-int" instructions were thrown into the same "class" for the purpose of instruction scheduling. – Mysticial Nov 27 '19 at 18:17
  • 1
    @Noah complex addressing also causes unlamination, which could explain the difference, or just an alignment adjustment which can always affect things. – BeeOnRope Mar 2 at 7:37
  • 1
    @Noah, I didn't look at the assembly, just these comments, but it seems all the versions use indexed addressing? I may have misread "indirect" as "indexed", also. I am not quite sure what the OP meant by indirect addressing. Still, to answer your question, a common way unlamination might matter is that it causes extra 1 hop per access, while setting up the address beforehand might only be 1 uop total. E.g. in a 4x unrolled loop, you might net a 3 uop savings by using 1 uop to calc the address, and then use base + offset addressing 4 times instead of indexed. – BeeOnRope Mar 3 at 2:38
54

I coded up an equivalent C program to experiment, and I can confirm this strange behaviour. What's more, gcc believes the 64-bit integer (which should probably be a size_t anyway...) to be better, as using uint_fast32_t causes gcc to use a 64-bit uint.

I did a bit of mucking around with the assembly:
Simply take the 32-bit version, replace all 32-bit instructions/registers with the 64-bit version in the inner popcount-loop of the program. Observation: the code is just as fast as the 32-bit version!

This is obviously a hack, as the size of the variable isn't really 64 bit, as other parts of the program still use the 32-bit version, but as long as the inner popcount-loop dominates performance, this is a good start.

I then copied the inner loop code from the 32-bit version of the program, hacked it up to be 64 bit, fiddled with the registers to make it a replacement for the inner loop of the 64-bit version. This code also runs as fast as the 32-bit version.

My conclusion is that this is bad instruction scheduling by the compiler, not actual speed/latency advantage of 32-bit instructions.

(Caveat: I hacked up assembly, could have broken something without noticing. I don't think so.)

2
  • 2
    “What's more, gcc believes the 64-bit integer […] to be better, as using uint_fast32_t causes gcc to use a 64-bit uint.” Unfortunately, and to my regret, there is no magic and no deep code introspection behind these types. I’ve yet to see them provided any other way than as single typedefs for every possible place and every program on the whole platform. There has likely been put quite some thought behind the exact choice of types, but the one definition for each of them cannot possibly fit to every application there will ever be. Some further reading: stackoverflow.com/q/4116297. – Keno Oct 18 '18 at 13:15
  • 2
    @Keno That's because sizeof(uint_fast32_t) has to be defined. If you allow it not to be, you can do that trickery, but that can only be accomplished with a compiler extension. – wizzwizz4 Nov 13 '18 at 18:03
28

This is not an answer, but it's hard to read if I put results in comment.

I get these results with a Mac Pro (Westmere 6-Cores Xeon 3.33 GHz). I compiled it with clang -O3 -msse4 -lstdc++ a.cpp -o a (-O2 get same result).

clang with uint64_t size=atol(argv[1])<<20;

unsigned    41950110000 0.811198 sec    12.9263 GB/s
uint64_t    41950110000 0.622884 sec    16.8342 GB/s

clang with uint64_t size=1<<20;

unsigned    41950110000 0.623406 sec    16.8201 GB/s
uint64_t    41950110000 0.623685 sec    16.8126 GB/s

I also tried to:

  1. Reverse the test order, the result is the same so it rules out the cache factor.
  2. Have the for statement in reverse: for (uint64_t i=size/8;i>0;i-=4). This gives the same result and proves the compile is smart enough to not divide size by 8 every iteration (as expected).

Here is my wild guess:

The speed factor comes in three parts:

  • code cache: uint64_t version has larger code size, but this does not have an effect on my Xeon CPU. This makes the 64-bit version slower.

  • Instructions used. Note not only the loop count, but the buffer is accessed with a 32-bit and 64-bit index on the two versions. Accessing a pointer with a 64-bit offset requests a dedicated 64-bit register and addressing, while you can use immediate for a 32-bit offset. This may make the 32-bit version faster.

  • Instructions are only emitted on the 64-bit compile (that is, prefetch). This makes 64-bit faster.

The three factors together match with the observed seemingly conflicting results.

7
  • 4
    Interesting, can you add compiler version and compiler flags? The best thing is that on your machine, the results are turned around, i.e., using u64 is faster. Until now, I have never thought about which type my loop variable has, but it seems I have to think twice next time :). – gexicide Aug 1 '14 at 11:05
  • 2
    @gexicide: I wouldn't call a jump from 16.8201 to 16.8126 making it "faster". – user541686 Aug 1 '14 at 11:11
  • 2
    @Mehrdad: The jump I mean is the one between 12.9 and 16.8, so unsigned is faster here. In my benchmark, the opposite was the case, i.e. 26 for unsigned, 15 for uint64_t – gexicide Aug 1 '14 at 11:13
  • @gexicide Have you notice the difference in addressing buffer[i]? – Non-maskable Interrupt Aug 1 '14 at 11:32
  • @Calvin: No, what do you mean? – gexicide Aug 1 '14 at 12:04
10

I can't give an authoritative answer, but provide an overview of a likely cause. This reference shows pretty clearly that for the instructions in the body of your loop there is a 3:1 ratio between latency and throughput. It also shows the effects of multiple dispatch. Since there are (give-or-take) three integer units in modern x86 processors, it's generally possible to dispatch three instructions per cycle.

So between peak pipeline and multiple dispatch performance and failure of these mechanisms, we have a factor of six in performance. It's pretty well known that the complexity of the x86 instruction set makes it quite easy for quirky breakage to occur. The document above has a great example:

The Pentium 4 performance for 64-bit right shifts is really poor. 64-bit left shift as well as all 32-bit shifts have acceptable performance. It appears that the data path from the upper 32 bits to the lower 32 bit of the ALU is not well designed.

I personally ran into a strange case where a hot loop ran considerably slower on a specific core of a four-core chip (AMD if I recall). We actually got better performance on a map-reduce calculation by turning that core off.

Here my guess is contention for integer units: that the popcnt, loop counter, and address calculations can all just barely run at full speed with the 32-bit wide counter, but the 64-bit counter causes contention and pipeline stalls. Since there are only about 12 cycles total, potentially 4 cycles with multiple dispatch, per loop body execution, a single stall could reasonably affect run time by a factor of 2.

The change induced by using a static variable, which I'm guessing just causes a minor reordering of instructions, is another clue that the 32-bit code is at some tipping point for contention.

I know this is not a rigorous analysis, but it is a plausible explanation.

5
  • 2
    Unfortunately, ever since (Core 2?) there are virtually no performance differences between 32-bit and 64-bit integer operations except for multiply/divide - which aren't present in this code. – Mysticial Aug 1 '14 at 20:20
  • @Gene: Note that all versions store the size in a register and never read it from stack in the loop. Thus, address calculation cannot be in the mix, at least not inside the loop. – gexicide Aug 1 '14 at 20:45
  • @Gene: Interesting explanation indeed! But it does not explain the main WTF points: That 64bit is slower than 32bit due to pipeline stalls is one thing. But if this is the case, shouldn't the 64bit version be reliably slower than the 32bit one? Instead, three different compilers emit slow code even for the 32bit version when using compile-time-constant buffer size; changing the buffer size to static again changes things completely. There was even a case on my colleagues machine (and in Calvin's answer) where the 64bit version is considerably faster! It seems to be absolutely unpredictable.. – gexicide Aug 1 '14 at 21:13
  • @Mysticial That's my point. There is no peak performance difference when there's zero contention for IU, bus time, etc. The reference clearly shows that. Contention makes everything different. Here's an example from the Intel Core literature: "One new technology included in the design is Macro-Ops Fusion, which combines two x86 instructions into a single micro-operation. For example, a common code sequence like a compare followed by a conditional jump would become a single micro-op. Unfortunately, this technology does not work in 64-bit mode." So we have a 2:1 ratio in execution speed. – Gene Aug 1 '14 at 21:21
  • @gexicide I see what you're saying, but you're inferring more than I meant. I'm saying the code that's running the fastest is keeping the pipeline and dispatch queues full. This condition is fragile. Minor changes like adding 32 bits to the total data flow and instruction reordering are enough to break it. In short, the OP assertion that fiddling and testing is the only way forward is correct. – Gene Aug 1 '14 at 21:25
10

I tried this with Visual Studio 2013 Express, using a pointer instead of an index, which sped up the process a bit. I suspect this is because the addressing is offset + register, instead of offset + register + (register<<3). C++ code.

   uint64_t* bfrend = buffer+(size/8);
   uint64_t* bfrptr;

// ...

   {
      startP = chrono::system_clock::now();
      count = 0;
      for (unsigned k = 0; k < 10000; k++){
         // Tight unrolled loop with uint64_t
         for (bfrptr = buffer; bfrptr < bfrend;){
            count += __popcnt64(*bfrptr++);
            count += __popcnt64(*bfrptr++);
            count += __popcnt64(*bfrptr++);
            count += __popcnt64(*bfrptr++);
         }
      }
      endP = chrono::system_clock::now();
      duration = chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(endP-startP).count();
      cout << "uint64_t\t"  << count << '\t' << (duration/1.0E9) << " sec \t"
           << (10000.0*size)/(duration) << " GB/s" << endl;
   }

assembly code: r10 = bfrptr, r15 = bfrend, rsi = count, rdi = buffer, r13 = k :

$LL5@main:
        mov     r10, rdi
        cmp     rdi, r15
        jae     SHORT $LN4@main
        npad    4
$LL2@main:
        mov     rax, QWORD PTR [r10+24]
        mov     rcx, QWORD PTR [r10+16]
        mov     r8, QWORD PTR [r10+8]
        mov     r9, QWORD PTR [r10]
        popcnt  rdx, rax
        popcnt  rax, rcx
        add     rdx, rax
        popcnt  rax, r8
        add     r10, 32
        add     rdx, rax
        popcnt  rax, r9
        add     rsi, rax
        add     rsi, rdx
        cmp     r10, r15
        jb      SHORT $LL2@main
$LN4@main:
        dec     r13
        jne     SHORT $LL5@main
9

Have you tried passing -funroll-loops -fprefetch-loop-arrays to GCC?

I get the following results with these additional optimizations:

[1829] /tmp/so_25078285 $ cat /proc/cpuinfo |grep CPU|head -n1
model name      : Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-3225 CPU @ 3.30GHz
[1829] /tmp/so_25078285 $ g++ --version|head -n1
g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.3-1ubuntu1) 4.7.3

[1829] /tmp/so_25078285 $ g++ -O3 -march=native -std=c++11 test.cpp -o test_o3
[1829] /tmp/so_25078285 $ g++ -O3 -march=native -funroll-loops -fprefetch-loop-arrays -std=c++11     test.cpp -o test_o3_unroll_loops__and__prefetch_loop_arrays

[1829] /tmp/so_25078285 $ ./test_o3 1
unsigned        41959360000     0.595 sec       17.6231 GB/s
uint64_t        41959360000     0.898626 sec    11.6687 GB/s

[1829] /tmp/so_25078285 $ ./test_o3_unroll_loops__and__prefetch_loop_arrays 1
unsigned        41959360000     0.618222 sec    16.9612 GB/s
uint64_t        41959360000     0.407304 sec    25.7443 GB/s
1
  • 3
    But still, your results are totally strange (first unsigned faster, then uint64_t faster) as unrolling does not fix the main problem of the false dependency. – gexicide Aug 4 '14 at 16:23
8

Have you tried moving the reduction step outside the loop? Right now you have a data dependency that really isn't needed.

Try:

  uint64_t subset_counts[4] = {};
  for( unsigned k = 0; k < 10000; k++){
     // Tight unrolled loop with unsigned
     unsigned i=0;
     while (i < size/8) {
        subset_counts[0] += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i]);
        subset_counts[1] += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+1]);
        subset_counts[2] += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+2]);
        subset_counts[3] += _mm_popcnt_u64(buffer[i+3]);
        i += 4;
     }
  }
  count = subset_counts[0] + subset_counts[1] + subset_counts[2] + subset_counts[3];

You also have some weird aliasing going on, that I'm not sure is conformant to the strict aliasing rules.

10
  • 2
    That was the first thing I've did after I've read the question. Break the dependency chain. As it turned out the performance difference does not change (on my computer at least - Intel Haswell with GCC 4.7.3). – Nils Pipenbrinck Aug 1 '14 at 18:42
  • 1
    @BenVoigt: It is conformant to strict aliasing. void* and char* are the two types which may be aliased, as they are esentially considered "pointers into some chunk of memory"! Your idea concerning the data dependency removal is nice for optimization, but it does not answer the question. And, as @NilsPipenbrinck says, it does not seem to change anything. – gexicide Aug 1 '14 at 19:24
  • @gexicide: The strict aliasing rule is not symmetric. You can use char* to access a T[]. You cannot safely use a T* to access a char[], and your code appears to do the latter. – Ben Voigt Aug 1 '14 at 19:29
  • @BenVoigt: Then you could never savely malloc an array of anything, as malloc returns void* and you interpret it as T[]. And I am pretty sure that void* and char* had the same semantics concerning strict aliasing. However, I guess this is quite offtopic here:) – gexicide Aug 1 '14 at 19:34
  • 1
    Personally I think the right way is uint64_t* buffer = new uint64_t[size/8]; /* type is clearly uint64_t[] */ char* charbuffer=reinterpret_cast<char*>(buffer); /* aliasing a uint64_t[] with char* is safe */ – Ben Voigt Aug 1 '14 at 20:28
7

TL;DR: Use __builtin intrinsics instead; they might happen to help.

I was able to make gcc 4.8.4 (and even 4.7.3 on gcc.godbolt.org) generate optimal code for this by using __builtin_popcountll which uses the same assembly instruction, but gets lucky and happens to make code that doesn't have an unexpectedly long loop-carried dependency because of the false dependency bug.

I am not 100% sure of my benchmarking code, but objdump output seems to share my views. I use some other tricks (++i vs i++) to make the compiler unroll loop for me without any movl instruction (strange behaviour, I must say).

Results:

Count: 20318230000  Elapsed: 0.411156 seconds   Speed: 25.503118 GB/s

Benchmarking code:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stddef.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

uint64_t builtin_popcnt(const uint64_t* buf, size_t len){
  uint64_t cnt = 0;
  for(size_t i = 0; i < len; ++i){
    cnt += __builtin_popcountll(buf[i]);
  }
  return cnt;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv){
  if(argc != 2){
    printf("Usage: %s <buffer size in MB>\n", argv[0]);
    return -1;
  }
  uint64_t size = atol(argv[1]) << 20;
  uint64_t* buffer = (uint64_t*)malloc((size/8)*sizeof(*buffer));

  // Spoil copy-on-write memory allocation on *nix
  for (size_t i = 0; i < (size / 8); i++) {
    buffer[i] = random();
  }
  uint64_t count = 0;
  clock_t tic = clock();
  for(size_t i = 0; i < 10000; ++i){
    count += builtin_popcnt(buffer, size/8);
  }
  clock_t toc = clock();
  printf("Count: %lu\tElapsed: %f seconds\tSpeed: %f GB/s\n", count, (double)(toc - tic) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC, ((10000.0*size)/(((double)(toc - tic)*1e+9) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC)));
  return 0;
}

Compile options:

gcc --std=gnu99 -mpopcnt -O3 -funroll-loops -march=native bench.c -o bench

GCC version:

gcc (Ubuntu 4.8.4-2ubuntu1~14.04.1) 4.8.4

Linux kernel version:

3.19.0-58-generic

CPU information:

processor   : 0
vendor_id   : GenuineIntel
cpu family  : 6
model       : 70
model name  : Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4870HQ CPU @ 2.50 GHz
stepping    : 1
microcode   : 0xf
cpu MHz     : 2494.226
cache size  : 6144 KB
physical id : 0
siblings    : 1
core id     : 0
cpu cores   : 1
apicid      : 0
initial apicid  : 0
fpu     : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level : 13
wp      : yes
flags       : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht syscall nx rdtscp lm constant_tsc nopl xtopology nonstop_tsc eagerfpu pni pclmulqdq ssse3 fma cx16 pcid sse4_1 sse4_2 x2apic movbe popcnt tsc_deadline_timer aes xsave avx f16c rdrand hypervisor lahf_lm abm arat pln pts dtherm fsgsbase tsc_adjust bmi1 hle avx2 smep bmi2 invpcid xsaveopt
bugs        :
bogomips    : 4988.45
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 36 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:
3
  • 3
    It's just good luck that -funroll-loops happens to make code that doesn't bottleneck on a loop-carried dependency chain created by popcnt's false dep. Using an old compiler version that doesn't know about the false dependency is a risk. Without -funroll-loops, gcc 4.8.5's loop will bottleneck on popcnt latency instead of throughput, because it counts into rdx. The same code, compiled by gcc 4.9.3 adds an xor edx,edx to break the dependency chain. – Peter Cordes May 4 '16 at 18:17
  • 3
    With old compilers, your code would still be vulnerable to exactly the same performance variation the OP experienced: seemingly-trivial changes could make gcc something slow because it had no idea it would cause a problem. Finding something that happens to work in one case on an old compiler is not the question. – Peter Cordes May 4 '16 at 18:19
  • 2
    For the record, x86intrin.h's _mm_popcnt_* functions on GCC are forcibly inlined wrappers around the __builtin_popcount*; the inlining should make one exactly equivalent to the other. I highly doubt you'd see any difference that could be caused by switching between them. – ShadowRanger Dec 2 '16 at 15:57
4

This is not an answer but a feedback with few compilers of 2021. On Intel CoffeeLake 9900k.

With Microsoft compiler (VS2019), toolset v142:

unsigned        209695540000    1.8322 sec      28.6152 GB/s
uint64_t        209695540000    3.08764 sec     16.9802 GB/s

With Intel compiler 2021:

unsigned        209695540000    1.70845 sec     30.688 GB/s
uint64_t        209695540000    1.57956 sec     33.1921 GB/s

According to Mysticial's answer, Intel compiler is aware of False Data Dependency, but not Microsoft compiler.

For intel compiler, I used /QxHost (optimize of CPU's architecture which is that of the host) /Oi (enable intrinsic functions) and #include <nmmintrin.h> instead of #include <immintrin.h>.

Full compile command: /GS /W3 /QxHost /Gy /Zi /O2 /D "NDEBUG" /D "_CONSOLE" /D "_UNICODE" /D "UNICODE" /Qipo /Zc:forScope /Oi /MD /Fa"x64\Release\" /EHsc /nologo /Fo"x64\Release\" //fprofile-instr-use "x64\Release\" /Fp"x64\Release\Benchmark.pch" .

The decompiled (by IDA 7.5) assembly from ICC:

int __cdecl main(int argc, const char **argv, const char **envp)
{
  int v6; // er13
  _BYTE *v8; // rsi
  unsigned int v9; // edi
  unsigned __int64 i; // rbx
  unsigned __int64 v11; // rdi
  int v12; // ebp
  __int64 v13; // r14
  __int64 v14; // rbx
  unsigned int v15; // eax
  unsigned __int64 v16; // rcx
  unsigned int v17; // eax
  unsigned __int64 v18; // rcx
  __int64 v19; // rdx
  unsigned int v20; // eax
  int result; // eax
  std::ostream *v23; // rbx
  char v24; // dl
  std::ostream *v33; // rbx
  std::ostream *v41; // rbx
  __int64 v42; // rdx
  unsigned int v43; // eax
  int v44; // ebp
  __int64 v45; // r14
  __int64 v46; // rbx
  unsigned __int64 v47; // rax
  unsigned __int64 v48; // rax
  std::ostream *v50; // rdi
  char v51; // dl
  std::ostream *v58; // rdi
  std::ostream *v60; // rdi
  __int64 v61; // rdx
  unsigned int v62; // eax

  __asm
  {
    vmovdqa [rsp+98h+var_58], xmm8
    vmovapd [rsp+98h+var_68], xmm7
    vmovapd [rsp+98h+var_78], xmm6
  }
  if ( argc == 2 )
  {
    v6 = atol(argv[1]) << 20;
    _R15 = v6;
    v8 = operator new[](v6);
    if ( v6 )
    {
      v9 = 1;
      for ( i = 0i64; i < v6; i = v9++ )
        v8[i] = rand();
    }
    v11 = (unsigned __int64)v6 >> 3;
    v12 = 0;
    v13 = Xtime_get_ticks_0();
    v14 = 0i64;
    do
    {
      if ( v6 )
      {
        v15 = 4;
        v16 = 0i64;
        do
        {
          v14 += __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v16])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v15 - 24])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v15 - 16])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v15 - 8]);
          v16 = v15;
          v15 += 4;
        }
        while ( v11 > v16 );
        v17 = 4;
        v18 = 0i64;
        do
        {
          v14 += __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v18])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v17 - 24])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v17 - 16])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v17 - 8]);
          v18 = v17;
          v17 += 4;
        }
        while ( v11 > v18 );
      }
      v12 += 2;
    }
    while ( v12 != 10000 );
    _RBP = 100 * (Xtime_get_ticks_0() - v13);
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char___(std::cout, "unsigned\t");
    v23 = (std::ostream *)std::ostream::operator<<(std::cout, v14);
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char____0(v23, v24);
    __asm
    {
      vmovq   xmm0, rbp
      vmovdqa xmm8, cs:__xmm@00000000000000004530000043300000
      vpunpckldq xmm0, xmm0, xmm8
      vmovapd xmm7, cs:__xmm@45300000000000004330000000000000
      vsubpd  xmm0, xmm0, xmm7
      vpermilpd xmm1, xmm0, 1
      vaddsd  xmm6, xmm1, xmm0
      vdivsd  xmm1, xmm6, cs:__real@41cdcd6500000000
    }
    v33 = (std::ostream *)std::ostream::operator<<(v23);
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char___(v33, " sec \t");
    __asm
    {
      vmovq   xmm0, r15
      vpunpckldq xmm0, xmm0, xmm8
      vsubpd  xmm0, xmm0, xmm7
      vpermilpd xmm1, xmm0, 1
      vaddsd  xmm0, xmm1, xmm0
      vmulsd  xmm7, xmm0, cs:__real@40c3880000000000
      vdivsd  xmm1, xmm7, xmm6
    }
    v41 = (std::ostream *)std::ostream::operator<<(v33);
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char___(v41, " GB/s");
    LOBYTE(v42) = 10;
    v43 = std::ios::widen((char *)v41 + *(int *)(*(_QWORD *)v41 + 4i64), v42);
    std::ostream::put(v41, v43);
    std::ostream::flush(v41);
    v44 = 0;
    v45 = Xtime_get_ticks_0();
    v46 = 0i64;
    do
    {
      if ( v6 )
      {
        v47 = 0i64;
        do
        {
          v46 += __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v47])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v47 + 8])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v47 + 16])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v47 + 24]);
          v47 += 4i64;
        }
        while ( v47 < v11 );
        v48 = 0i64;
        do
        {
          v46 += __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v48])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v48 + 8])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v48 + 16])
               + __popcnt(*(_QWORD *)&v8[8 * v48 + 24]);
          v48 += 4i64;
        }
        while ( v48 < v11 );
      }
      v44 += 2;
    }
    while ( v44 != 10000 );
    _RBP = 100 * (Xtime_get_ticks_0() - v45);
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char___(std::cout, "uint64_t\t");
    v50 = (std::ostream *)std::ostream::operator<<(std::cout, v46);
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char____0(v50, v51);
    __asm
    {
      vmovq   xmm0, rbp
      vpunpckldq xmm0, xmm0, cs:__xmm@00000000000000004530000043300000
      vsubpd  xmm0, xmm0, cs:__xmm@45300000000000004330000000000000
      vpermilpd xmm1, xmm0, 1
      vaddsd  xmm6, xmm1, xmm0
      vdivsd  xmm1, xmm6, cs:__real@41cdcd6500000000
    }
    v58 = (std::ostream *)std::ostream::operator<<(v50);
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char___(v58, " sec \t");
    __asm { vdivsd  xmm1, xmm7, xmm6 }
    v60 = (std::ostream *)std::ostream::operator<<(v58);
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char___(v60, " GB/s");
    LOBYTE(v61) = 10;
    v62 = std::ios::widen((char *)v60 + *(int *)(*(_QWORD *)v60 + 4i64), v61);
    std::ostream::put(v60, v62);
    std::ostream::flush(v60);
    free(v8);
    result = 0;
  }
  else
  {
    std::operator___std::char_traits_char___(std::cerr, "usage: array_size in MB");
    LOBYTE(v19) = 10;
    v20 = std::ios::widen((char *)&std::cerr + *((int *)std::cerr + 1), v19);
    std::ostream::put(std::cerr, v20);
    std::ostream::flush(std::cerr);
    result = -1;
  }
  __asm
  {
    vmovaps xmm6, [rsp+98h+var_78]
    vmovaps xmm7, [rsp+98h+var_68]
    vmovaps xmm8, [rsp+98h+var_58]
  }
  return result;
}

and disassembly of main:

.text:0140001000    .686p
.text:0140001000    .mmx
.text:0140001000    .model flat
.text:0140001000
.text:0140001000 ; ===========================================================================
.text:0140001000
.text:0140001000 ; Segment type: Pure code
.text:0140001000 ; Segment permissions: Read/Execute
.text:0140001000 _text           segment para public 'CODE' use64
.text:0140001000    assume cs:_text
.text:0140001000    ;org 140001000h
.text:0140001000    assume es:nothing, ss:nothing, ds:_data, fs:nothing, gs:nothing
.text:0140001000
.text:0140001000 ; =============== S U B R O U T I N E =======================================
.text:0140001000
.text:0140001000
.text:0140001000 ; int __cdecl main(int argc, const char **argv, const char **envp)
.text:0140001000 main            proc near      ; CODE XREF: __scrt_common_main_seh+107↓p
.text:0140001000      ; DATA XREF: .pdata:ExceptionDir↓o
.text:0140001000
.text:0140001000 var_78          = xmmword ptr -78h
.text:0140001000 var_68          = xmmword ptr -68h
.text:0140001000 var_58          = xmmword ptr -58h
.text:0140001000
.text:0140001000    push    r15
.text:0140001002    push    r14
.text:0140001004    push    r13
.text:0140001006    push    r12
.text:0140001008    push    rsi
.text:0140001009    push    rdi
.text:014000100A    push    rbp
.text:014000100B    push    rbx
.text:014000100C    sub     rsp, 58h
.text:0140001010    vmovdqa [rsp+98h+var_58], xmm8
.text:0140001016    vmovapd [rsp+98h+var_68], xmm7
.text:014000101C    vmovapd [rsp+98h+var_78], xmm6
.text:0140001022    cmp     ecx, 2
.text:0140001025    jnz     loc_14000113E
.text:014000102B    mov     rcx, [rdx+8]    ; String
.text:014000102F    call    cs:__imp_atol
.text:0140001035    mov     r13d, eax
.text:0140001038    shl     r13d, 14h
.text:014000103C    movsxd  r15, r13d
.text:014000103F    mov     rcx, r15        ; size
.text:0140001042    call    ??_U@YAPEAX_K@Z ; operator new[](unsigned __int64)
.text:0140001047    mov     rsi, rax
.text:014000104A    test    r15d, r15d
.text:014000104D    jz      short loc_14000106E
.text:014000104F    mov     edi, 1
.text:0140001054    xor     ebx, ebx
.text:0140001056    mov     rbp, cs:__imp_rand
.text:014000105D    nop     dword ptr [rax]
.text:0140001060
.text:0140001060 loc_140001060:    ; CODE XREF: main+6C↓j
.text:0140001060    call    rbp ; __imp_rand
.text:0140001062    mov     [rsi+rbx], al
.text:0140001065    mov     ebx, edi
.text:0140001067    inc     edi
.text:0140001069    cmp     rbx, r15
.text:014000106C    jb      short loc_140001060
.text:014000106E
.text:014000106E loc_14000106E:    ; CODE XREF: main+4D↑j
.text:014000106E    mov     rdi, r15
.text:0140001071    shr     rdi, 3
.text:0140001075    xor     ebp, ebp
.text:0140001077    call    _Xtime_get_ticks_0
.text:014000107C    mov     r14, rax
.text:014000107F    xor     ebx, ebx
.text:0140001081    jmp     short loc_14000109F
.text:0140001081 ; ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
.text:0140001083    align 10h
.text:0140001090
.text:0140001090 loc_140001090:    ; CODE XREF: main+A2↓j
.text:0140001090      ; main+EC↓j ...
.text:0140001090    add     ebp, 2
.text:0140001093    cmp     ebp, 2710h
.text:0140001099    jz      loc_140001184
.text:014000109F
.text:014000109F loc_14000109F:    ; CODE XREF: main+81↑j
.text:014000109F    test    r13d, r13d
.text:01400010A2    jz      short loc_140001090
.text:01400010A4    mov     eax, 4
.text:01400010A9    xor     ecx, ecx
.text:01400010AB    nop     dword ptr [rax+rax+00h]
.text:01400010B0
.text:01400010B0 loc_1400010B0:    ; CODE XREF: main+E7↓j
.text:01400010B0    popcnt  rcx, qword ptr [rsi+rcx*8]
.text:01400010B6    add     rcx, rbx
.text:01400010B9    lea     edx, [rax-3]
.text:01400010BC    popcnt  rdx, qword ptr [rsi+rdx*8]
.text:01400010C2    add     rdx, rcx
.text:01400010C5    lea     ecx, [rax-2]
.text:01400010C8    popcnt  rcx, qword ptr [rsi+rcx*8]
.text:01400010CE    add     rcx, rdx
.text:01400010D1    lea     edx, [rax-1]
.text:01400010D4    xor     ebx, ebx
.text:01400010D6    popcnt  rbx, qword ptr [rsi+rdx*8]
.text:01400010DC    add     rbx, rcx
.text:01400010DF    mov     ecx, eax
.text:01400010E1    add     eax, 4
.text:01400010E4    cmp     rdi, rcx
.text:01400010E7    ja      short loc_1400010B0
.text:01400010E9    test    r13d, r13d
.text:01400010EC    jz      short loc_140001090
.text:01400010EE    mov     eax, 4
.text:01400010F3    xor     ecx, ecx
.text:01400010F5    db      2Eh
.text:01400010F5    nop     word ptr [rax+rax+00000000h]
.text:01400010FF    nop
.text:0140001100
.text:0140001100 loc_140001100:    ; CODE XREF: main+137↓j
.text:0140001100    popcnt  rcx, qword ptr [rsi+rcx*8]
.text:0140001106    add     rcx, rbx
.text:0140001109    lea     edx, [rax-3]
.text:014000110C    popcnt  rdx, qword ptr [rsi+rdx*8]
.text:0140001112    add     rdx, rcx
.text:0140001115    lea     ecx, [rax-2]
.text:0140001118    popcnt  rcx, qword ptr [rsi+rcx*8]
.text:014000111E    add     rcx, rdx
.text:0140001121    lea     edx, [rax-1]
.text:0140001124    xor     ebx, ebx
.text:0140001126    popcnt  rbx, qword ptr [rsi+rdx*8]
.text:014000112C    add     rbx, rcx
.text:014000112F    mov     ecx, eax
.text:0140001131    add     eax, 4
.text:0140001134    cmp     rdi, rcx
.text:0140001137    ja      short loc_140001100
.text:0140001139    jmp     loc_140001090
.text:014000113E ; ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
.text:014000113E
.text:014000113E loc_14000113E:    ; CODE XREF: main+25↑j
.text:014000113E    mov     rsi, cs:__imp_?cerr@std@@3V?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@1@A ; std::ostream std::cerr
.text:0140001145    lea     rdx, aUsageArraySize ; "usage: array_size in MB"
.text:014000114C    mov     rcx, rsi        ; std::ostream *
.text:014000114F    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char___
.text:0140001154    mov     rax, [rsi]
.text:0140001157    movsxd  rcx, dword ptr [rax+4]
.text:014000115B    add     rcx, rsi
.text:014000115E    mov     dl, 0Ah
.text:0140001160    call    cs:__imp_?widen@?$basic_ios@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEBADD@Z ; std::ios::widen(char)
.text:0140001166    mov     rcx, rsi
.text:0140001169    mov     edx, eax
.text:014000116B    call    cs:__imp_?put@?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV12@D@Z ; std::ostream::put(char)
.text:0140001171    mov     rcx, rsi
.text:0140001174    call    cs:__imp_?flush@?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV12@XZ ; std::ostream::flush(void)
.text:014000117A    mov     eax, 0FFFFFFFFh
.text:014000117F    jmp     loc_1400013E2
.text:0140001184 ; ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
.text:0140001184
.text:0140001184 loc_140001184:    ; CODE XREF: main+99↑j
.text:0140001184    call    _Xtime_get_ticks_0
.text:0140001189    sub     rax, r14
.text:014000118C    imul    rbp, rax, 64h ; 'd'
.text:0140001190    mov     r14, cs:__imp_?cout@std@@3V?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@1@A ; std::ostream std::cout
.text:0140001197    lea     rdx, aUnsigned  ; "unsigned\t"
.text:014000119E    mov     rcx, r14        ; std::ostream *
.text:01400011A1    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char___
.text:01400011A6    mov     rcx, r14
.text:01400011A9    mov     rdx, rbx
.text:01400011AC    call    cs:__imp_??6?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV01@_K@Z ; std::ostream::operator<<(unsigned __int64)
.text:01400011B2    mov     rbx, rax
.text:01400011B5    mov     rcx, rax        ; std::ostream *
.text:01400011B8    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char____0
.text:01400011BD    vmovq   xmm0, rbp
.text:01400011C2    vmovdqa xmm8, cs:__xmm@00000000000000004530000043300000
.text:01400011CA    vpunpckldq xmm0, xmm0, xmm8
.text:01400011CF    vmovapd xmm7, cs:__xmm@45300000000000004330000000000000
.text:01400011D7    vsubpd  xmm0, xmm0, xmm7
.text:01400011DB    vpermilpd xmm1, xmm0, 1
.text:01400011E1    vaddsd  xmm6, xmm1, xmm0
.text:01400011E5    vdivsd  xmm1, xmm6, cs:__real@41cdcd6500000000
.text:01400011ED    mov     r12, cs:__imp_??6?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV01@N@Z ; std::ostream::operator<<(double)
.text:01400011F4    mov     rcx, rbx
.text:01400011F7    call    r12 ; std::ostream::operator<<(double) ; std::ostream::operator<<(double)
.text:01400011FA    mov     rbx, rax
.text:01400011FD    lea     rdx, aSec       ; " sec \t"
.text:0140001204    mov     rcx, rax        ; std::ostream *
.text:0140001207    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char___
.text:014000120C    vmovq   xmm0, r15
.text:0140001211    vpunpckldq xmm0, xmm0, xmm8
.text:0140001216    vsubpd  xmm0, xmm0, xmm7
.text:014000121A    vpermilpd xmm1, xmm0, 1
.text:0140001220    vaddsd  xmm0, xmm1, xmm0
.text:0140001224    vmulsd  xmm7, xmm0, cs:__real@40c3880000000000
.text:014000122C    vdivsd  xmm1, xmm7, xmm6
.text:0140001230    mov     rcx, rbx
.text:0140001233    call    r12 ; std::ostream::operator<<(double) ; std::ostream::operator<<(double)
.text:0140001236    mov     rbx, rax
.text:0140001239    lea     rdx, aGbS       ; " GB/s"
.text:0140001240    mov     rcx, rax        ; std::ostream *
.text:0140001243    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char___
.text:0140001248    mov     rax, [rbx]
.text:014000124B    movsxd  rcx, dword ptr [rax+4]
.text:014000124F    add     rcx, rbx
.text:0140001252    mov     dl, 0Ah
.text:0140001254    call    cs:__imp_?widen@?$basic_ios@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEBADD@Z ; std::ios::widen(char)
.text:014000125A    mov     rcx, rbx
.text:014000125D    mov     edx, eax
.text:014000125F    call    cs:__imp_?put@?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV12@D@Z ; std::ostream::put(char)
.text:0140001265    mov     rcx, rbx
.text:0140001268    call    cs:__imp_?flush@?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV12@XZ ; std::ostream::flush(void)
.text:014000126E    xor     ebp, ebp
.text:0140001270    call    _Xtime_get_ticks_0
.text:0140001275    mov     r14, rax
.text:0140001278    xor     ebx, ebx
.text:014000127A    jmp     short loc_14000128F
.text:014000127A ; ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
.text:014000127C    align 20h
.text:0140001280
.text:0140001280 loc_140001280:    ; CODE XREF: main+292↓j
.text:0140001280      ; main+2DB↓j ...
.text:0140001280    add     ebp, 2
.text:0140001283    cmp     ebp, 2710h
.text:0140001289    jz      loc_14000131D
.text:014000128F
.text:014000128F loc_14000128F:    ; CODE XREF: main+27A↑j
.text:014000128F    test    r13d, r13d
.text:0140001292    jz      short loc_140001280
.text:0140001294    xor     eax, eax
.text:0140001296    db      2Eh
.text:0140001296    nop     word ptr [rax+rax+00000000h]
.text:01400012A0
.text:01400012A0 loc_1400012A0:    ; CODE XREF: main+2D6↓j
.text:01400012A0    xor     ecx, ecx
.text:01400012A2    popcnt  rcx, qword ptr [rsi+rax*8]
.text:01400012A8    add     rcx, rbx
.text:01400012AB    xor     edx, edx
.text:01400012AD    popcnt  rdx, qword ptr [rsi+rax*8+8]
.text:01400012B4    add     rdx, rcx
.text:01400012B7    xor     ecx, ecx
.text:01400012B9    popcnt  rcx, qword ptr [rsi+rax*8+10h]
.text:01400012C0    add     rcx, rdx
.text:01400012C3    xor     ebx, ebx
.text:01400012C5    popcnt  rbx, qword ptr [rsi+rax*8+18h]
.text:01400012CC    add     rbx, rcx
.text:01400012CF    add     rax, 4
.text:01400012D3    cmp     rax, rdi
.text:01400012D6    jb      short loc_1400012A0
.text:01400012D8    test    r13d, r13d
.text:01400012DB    jz      short loc_140001280
.text:01400012DD    xor     eax, eax
.text:01400012DF    nop
.text:01400012E0
.text:01400012E0 loc_1400012E0:    ; CODE XREF: main+316↓j
.text:01400012E0    xor     ecx, ecx
.text:01400012E2    popcnt  rcx, qword ptr [rsi+rax*8]
.text:01400012E8    add     rcx, rbx
.text:01400012EB    xor     edx, edx
.text:01400012ED    popcnt  rdx, qword ptr [rsi+rax*8+8]
.text:01400012F4    add     rdx, rcx
.text:01400012F7    xor     ecx, ecx
.text:01400012F9    popcnt  rcx, qword ptr [rsi+rax*8+10h]
.text:0140001300    add     rcx, rdx
.text:0140001303    xor     ebx, ebx
.text:0140001305    popcnt  rbx, qword ptr [rsi+rax*8+18h]
.text:014000130C    add     rbx, rcx
.text:014000130F    add     rax, 4
.text:0140001313    cmp     rax, rdi
.text:0140001316    jb      short loc_1400012E0
.text:0140001318    jmp     loc_140001280
.text:014000131D ; ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
.text:014000131D
.text:014000131D loc_14000131D:    ; CODE XREF: main+289↑j
.text:014000131D    call    _Xtime_get_ticks_0
.text:0140001322    sub     rax, r14
.text:0140001325    imul    rbp, rax, 64h ; 'd'
.text:0140001329    mov     rdi, cs:__imp_?cout@std@@3V?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@1@A ; std::ostream std::cout
.text:0140001330    lea     rdx, aUint64T   ; "uint64_t\t"
.text:0140001337    mov     rcx, rdi        ; std::ostream *
.text:014000133A    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char___
.text:014000133F    mov     rcx, rdi
.text:0140001342    mov     rdx, rbx
.text:0140001345    call    cs:__imp_??6?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV01@_K@Z ; std::ostream::operator<<(unsigned __int64)
.text:014000134B    mov     rdi, rax
.text:014000134E    mov     rcx, rax        ; std::ostream *
.text:0140001351    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char____0
.text:0140001356    vmovq   xmm0, rbp
.text:014000135B    vpunpckldq xmm0, xmm0, cs:__xmm@00000000000000004530000043300000
.text:0140001363    vsubpd  xmm0, xmm0, cs:__xmm@45300000000000004330000000000000
.text:014000136B    vpermilpd xmm1, xmm0, 1
.text:0140001371    vaddsd  xmm6, xmm1, xmm0
.text:0140001375    vdivsd  xmm1, xmm6, cs:__real@41cdcd6500000000
.text:014000137D    mov     rcx, rdi
.text:0140001380    call    r12 ; std::ostream::operator<<(double) ; std::ostream::operator<<(double)
.text:0140001383    mov     rdi, rax
.text:0140001386    lea     rdx, aSec       ; " sec \t"
.text:014000138D    mov     rcx, rax        ; std::ostream *
.text:0140001390    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char___
.text:0140001395    vdivsd  xmm1, xmm7, xmm6
.text:0140001399    mov     rcx, rdi
.text:014000139C    call    r12 ; std::ostream::operator<<(double) ; std::ostream::operator<<(double)
.text:014000139F    mov     rdi, rax
.text:01400013A2    lea     rdx, aGbS       ; " GB/s"
.text:01400013A9    mov     rcx, rax        ; std::ostream *
.text:01400013AC    call    std__operator___std__char_traits_char___
.text:01400013B1    mov     rax, [rdi]
.text:01400013B4    movsxd  rcx, dword ptr [rax+4]
.text:01400013B8    add     rcx, rdi
.text:01400013BB    mov     dl, 0Ah
.text:01400013BD    call    cs:__imp_?widen@?$basic_ios@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEBADD@Z ; std::ios::widen(char)
.text:01400013C3    mov     rcx, rdi
.text:01400013C6    mov     edx, eax
.text:01400013C8    call    cs:__imp_?put@?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV12@D@Z ; std::ostream::put(char)
.text:01400013CE    mov     rcx, rdi
.text:01400013D1    call    cs:__imp_?flush@?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@QEAAAEAV12@XZ ; std::ostream::flush(void)
.text:01400013D7    mov     rcx, rsi        ; Block
.text:01400013DA    call    cs:__imp_free
.text:01400013E0    xor     eax, eax
.text:01400013E2
.text:01400013E2 loc_1400013E2:    ; CODE XREF: main+17F↑j
.text:01400013E2    vmovaps xmm6, [rsp+98h+var_78]
.text:01400013E8    vmovaps xmm7, [rsp+98h+var_68]
.text:01400013EE    vmovaps xmm8, [rsp+98h+var_58]
.text:01400013F4    add     rsp, 58h
.text:01400013F8    pop     rbx
.text:01400013F9    pop     rbp
.text:01400013FA    pop     rdi
.text:01400013FB    pop     rsi
.text:01400013FC    pop     r12
.text:01400013FE    pop     r13
.text:0140001400    pop     r14
.text:0140001402    pop     r15
.text:0140001404    retn
.text:0140001404 main            endp

Coffee lake specification update "POPCNT instruction may take longer to execute than expected".

8
  • How did you actually compile with ICC? godbolt.org/z/aWxr95 shows ICC -O3 -march=skylake inverts the k = 0 .. 10000 repeat loop, summing 4 popcnt results and then for some insane reason broadcasting into YMM registers and adding 10k times (instead of multiplying once) into a vector accumulator (ymm2) which it then horizontally sums. This should produce results that are artificially higher than one 8-byte popcnt per clock cycle. (I think; unless that SIMD loop is actually not doing 4 useful things in parallel.) – Peter Cordes Jan 30 at 3:09
  • Anyway, ICC is careful to do popcnt same,same to avoid the false dep, but it looks like it's defeating this actual benchmark and not running popcnt every repeat count, only 1/10000th as much as that. – Peter Cordes Jan 30 at 3:09
  • @PeterCordes I added the disassembly produced by ICC and its pseudocode, and compilation details. – Soleil Jan 30 at 3:24
  • 1
    @gexicide For Coffee lake: "POPCNT instruction may take longer to execute than expected" intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/… – Soleil Feb 1 at 17:26
  • 1
    @gexicide: The false dep for lzcnt/tzcnt was fixed on Skylake. The false dep for popcnt wasn't fixed until CannonLake / IceLake. (Why does breaking the "output dependency" of LZCNT matter? covers both). They're related because they all run on the same execution unit. – Peter Cordes Feb 1 at 21:18
-2

First of all, try to estimate peak performance - examine https://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/manuals/64-ia-32-architectures-optimization-manual.pdf, in particular, Appendix C.

In your case, it's table C-10 that shows POPCNT instruction has latency = 3 clocks and throughput = 1 clock. Throughput shows your maximal rate in clocks (multiply by core frequency and 8 bytes in case of popcnt64 to get your best possible bandwidth number).

Now examine what compiler did and sum up throughputs of all other instructions in the loop. This will give best possible estimate for generated code.

At last, look at data dependencies between instructions in the loop as they will force latency-large delay instead of throughput - so split instructions of single iteration on data flow chains and calculate latency across them then naively pick up maximal from them. it will give rough estimate taking into account data flow dependencies.

However, in your case, just writing code the right way would eliminate all these complexities. Instead of accumulating to the same count variable, just accumulate to different ones (like count0, count1, ... count8) and sum them up at the end. Or even create an array of counts[8] and accumulate to its elements - perhaps, it will be vectorized even and you will get much better throughput.

P.S. and never run benchmark for a second, first warm up the core then run loop for at least 10 seconds or better 100 seconds. otherwise, you will test power management firmware and DVFS implementation in hardware :)

P.P.S. I heard endless debates on how much time should benchmark really run. Most smartest folks are even asking why 10 seconds not 11 or 12. I should admit this is funny in theory. In practice, you just go and run benchmark hundred times in a row and record deviations. That IS funny. Most people do change source and run bench after that exactly ONCE to capture new performance record. Do the right things right.

Not convinced still? Just use above C-version of benchmark by assp1r1n3 (https://stackoverflow.com/a/37026212/9706746) and try 100 instead of 10000 in retry loop.

My 7960X shows, with RETRY=100:

Count: 203182300 Elapsed: 0.008385 seconds Speed: 12.505379 GB/s

Count: 203182300 Elapsed: 0.011063 seconds Speed: 9.478225 GB/s

Count: 203182300 Elapsed: 0.011188 seconds Speed: 9.372327 GB/s

Count: 203182300 Elapsed: 0.010393 seconds Speed: 10.089252 GB/s

Count: 203182300 Elapsed: 0.009076 seconds Speed: 11.553283 GB/s

with RETRY=10000:

Count: 20318230000 Elapsed: 0.661791 seconds Speed: 15.844519 GB/s

Count: 20318230000 Elapsed: 0.665422 seconds Speed: 15.758060 GB/s

Count: 20318230000 Elapsed: 0.660983 seconds Speed: 15.863888 GB/s

Count: 20318230000 Elapsed: 0.665337 seconds Speed: 15.760073 GB/s

Count: 20318230000 Elapsed: 0.662138 seconds Speed: 15.836215 GB/s

P.P.P.S. Finally, on "accepted answer" and other mistery ;-)

Let's use assp1r1n3's answer - he has 2.5Ghz core. POPCNT has 1 clock throuhgput, his code is using 64-bit popcnt. So math is 2.5Ghz * 1 clock * 8 bytes = 20 GB/s for his setup. He is seeing 25Gb/s, perhaps due to turbo boost to around 3Ghz.

Thus go to ark.intel.com and look for i7-4870HQ: https://ark.intel.com/products/83504/Intel-Core-i7-4870HQ-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3-70-GHz-?q=i7-4870HQ

That core could run up to 3.7Ghz and real maximal rate is 29.6 GB/s for his hardware. So where is another 4GB/s? Perhaps, it's spent on loop logic and other surrounding code within each iteration.

Now where is this false dependency? hardware runs at almost peak rate. Maybe my math is bad, it happens sometimes :)

P.P.P.P.P.S. Still people suggesting HW errata is culprit, so I follow suggestion and created inline asm example, see below.

On my 7960X, first version (with single output to cnt0) runs at 11MB/s, second version (with output to cnt0, cnt1, cnt2 and cnt3) runs at 33MB/s. And one could say - voila! it's output dependency.

OK, maybe, the point I made is that it does not make sense to write code like this and it's not output dependency problem but dumb code generation. We are not testing hardware, we are writing code to unleash maximal performance. You could expect that HW OOO should rename and hide those "output-dependencies" but, gash, just do the right things right and you will never face any mystery.

uint64_t builtin_popcnt1a(const uint64_t* buf, size_t len) 
{
    uint64_t cnt0, cnt1, cnt2, cnt3;
    cnt0 = cnt1 = cnt2 = cnt3 = 0;
    uint64_t val = buf[0];
    #if 0
        __asm__ __volatile__ (
            "1:\n\t"
            "popcnt %2, %1\n\t"
            "popcnt %2, %1\n\t"
            "popcnt %2, %1\n\t"
            "popcnt %2, %1\n\t"
            "subq $4, %0\n\t"
            "jnz 1b\n\t"
        : "+q" (len), "=q" (cnt0)
        : "q" (val)
        :
        );
    #else
        __asm__ __volatile__ (
            "1:\n\t"
            "popcnt %5, %1\n\t"
            "popcnt %5, %2\n\t"
            "popcnt %5, %3\n\t"
            "popcnt %5, %4\n\t"
            "subq $4, %0\n\t"
            "jnz 1b\n\t"
        : "+q" (len), "=q" (cnt0), "=q" (cnt1), "=q" (cnt2), "=q" (cnt3)
        : "q" (val)
        :
        );
    #endif
    return cnt0;
}
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    If you're timing in core clock cycles (instead of seconds), 1 second is plenty of time for a tiny CPU-bound loop. Even 100ms is fine for finding major differences or checking perf counters for uop counts. Especially on a Skylake, where hardware P-state management lets it ramp up to max clock speed in microseconds after load starts. – Peter Cordes Oct 23 '18 at 21:32
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    clang can auto-vectorize __builtin_popcountl with AVX2 vpshufb, and doesn't need multiple accumulators in the C source to do so. I'm not sure about _mm_popcnt_u64; that might only auto-vectorize with AVX512-VPOPCNT. (See Counting 1 bits (population count) on large data using AVX-512 or AVX-2/) – Peter Cordes Oct 23 '18 at 21:36
  • But anyway, looking at Intel's optimization manual won't help: as the accepted answer shows, the problem is an unexpected output dependency for popcnt. This is documented in Intel's errata for some of their recent microarchitectures, but I think wasn't at the time. Your dep-chain analysis will fail if there are unexpected false dependencies, so this answer is good generic advice but not applicable here. – Peter Cordes Oct 23 '18 at 21:37
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    Are you kidding me? I don't have to "believe" in things I can measure experimentally with performance counters in a hand-written asm loop. They're just facts. I have tested, and Skylake fixed the false dependency for lzcnt / tzcnt, but not for popcnt. See Intel's erratum SKL029 in intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/…. Also, gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=62011 is "resolved fixed", not "invalid". There's no basis for your claim that there's no output dependency in the HW. – Peter Cordes Oct 24 '18 at 11:29
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    If you make a simple loop like popcnt eax, edx / dec ecx / jnz, you'd expect it to run at 1 per clock, bottlenecked on popcnt throughput and taken-branch throughput. But it actually only runs at 1 per 3 clocks bottlenecked on popcnt latency for repeatedly overwriting EAX, even though you'd expect it to be write-only. You have a Skylake, so you can try it yourself. – Peter Cordes Oct 24 '18 at 11:33
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Ok, I want to provide a small answer to one of the sub-questions that the OP asked that don't seem to be addressed in the existing questions. Caveat, I have not done any testing or code generation, or disassembly, just wanted to share a thought for others to possibly expound upon.

Why does the static change the performance?

The line in question: uint64_t size = atol(argv[1])<<20;

Short Answer

I would look at the assembly generated for accessing size and see if there are extra steps of pointer indirection involved for the non-static version.

Long Answer

Since there is only one copy of the variable whether it was declared static or not, and the size doesn't change, I theorize that the difference is the location of the memory used to back the variable along with where it is used in the code further down.

Ok, to start with the obvious, remember that all local variables (along with parameters) of a function are provided space on the stack for use as storage. Now, obviously, the stack frame for main() never cleans up and is only generated once. Ok, what about making it static? Well, in that case the compiler knows to reserve space in the global data space of the process so the location can not be cleared by the removal of a stack frame. But still, we only have one location so what is the difference? I suspect it has to do with how memory locations on the stack are referenced.

When the compiler is generating the symbol table, it just makes an entry for a label along with relevant attributes, like size, etc. It knows that it must reserve the appropriate space in memory but doesn't actually pick that location until somewhat later in process after doing liveness analysis and possibly register allocation. How then does the linker know what address to provide to the machine code for the final assembly code? It either knows the final location or knows how to arrive at the location. With a stack, it is pretty simple to refer to a location based one two elements, the pointer to the stackframe and then an offset into the frame. This is basically because the linker can't know the location of the stackframe before runtime.

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    It seems much more likely to me that using static happened to change register allocation for the function in a way that affected the false output dependency of popcnt on the Intel CPUs the OP was testing on, with a compiler that didn't know to avoid them. (Because this performance pothole in Intel CPUs hadn't been discovered yet.) A compiler can keep a static local variable in a register, just like an automatic storage variable, but if they don't optimize assuming main only runs once, then it will affect code-gen (because the value is set by the first call only.) – Peter Cordes Jan 29 '19 at 20:48
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    Anyway, the performance difference between [RIP + rel32] and [rsp + 42] addressing modes is pretty negligible for most cases. cmp dword [RIP+rel32], immediate can't micro-fuse into a single load+cmp uop, but I don't think that's going to be a factor. Like I said, inside loops it probably stays in a register anyway, but tweaking the C++ can mean different compiler choices. – Peter Cordes Jan 29 '19 at 20:52

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