Is there an Swift equivalent of NSLocalizedString(...)? In Objective-C, we usually use:

NSString *string = NSLocalizedString(@"key", @"comment");

How can I achieve the same in Swift? I found a function:

func NSLocalizedString(
    key: String,
    tableName: String? = default,
    bundle: NSBundle = default,
    value: String = default,
    #comment: String) -> String

However, it is very long and not convenient at all.

  • 1
    Best is to create shorter version of code snippet: NSLocalizedString("", comment: "") ... I liked the extension solution, but the problem is genstrings will not capture these strings into translation file. – Matej Ukmar Aug 6 '15 at 10:46
  • 2
    In Swift 3 you can just use NSLocalizedString("Cancel", comment: "Cancel button title") taking advantage of the default values. It is convenient I think. – LShi Feb 7 '17 at 1:21
  • This is a very good article about localization (string extension, different strings tables and even pluralization): medium.com/@marcosantadev/… – LightMan Jun 14 at 8:46

14 Answers 14

I use next solution:

1) create extension:

extension String {
    var localized: String {
        return NSLocalizedString(self, tableName: nil, bundle: Bundle.main, value: "", comment: "")
    }
}

2) in Localizable.strings file:

"Hi" = "Привет";

3) example of use:

myLabel.text = "Hi".localized

enjoy! ;)

--upd:--

for case with comments you can use this solution:

1) Extension:

extension String {
    func localized(withComment:String) -> String {
        return NSLocalizedString(self, tableName: nil, bundle: Bundle.main, value: "", comment: withComment)
    }
}

2) in .strings file:

/* with !!! */
"Hi" = "Привет!!!";

3) using:

myLabel.text = "Hi".localized(withComment: "with !!!")
  • 79
    The only issue with this is that you won't be able to use the genstrings utility to generate your .strings files. – Ned May 4 '15 at 22:21
  • 8
    That's a very good idea! I also made it a little bit smarter by changing to func localized(comment: String = "") -> String so it becomes smaller and with optional comments :) – Guilherme Sprint Jul 1 '15 at 17:58
  • 1
    Any idea how to use genstrings with this? – Chris Sep 29 '15 at 8:46
  • 37
    Everybody is very excited about this answer, but the BIG problem (for any serious project with several languages) is that this completely messes up your management of your translated messages, because genstrings only works on literal strings passed in to NSLocalizedString. With this clever workaround, you lose the ability to update your .strings files using the genstrings tool, and at least for me that means I will not be able to use this simplified approach. – Erik van der Neut Mar 2 '16 at 10:30
  • 10
    I found this great solution implemented in github.com/marmelroy/Localize-Swift. Problem of genstrings is also resolved by custom python script included by the author. I am not an author. – Tomek Cejner Apr 30 '16 at 15:01
up vote 260 down vote accepted

The NSLocalizedString exists also in the Swift's world.

func NSLocalizedString(
    key: String,
    tableName: String? = default,
    bundle: NSBundle = default,
    value: String = default,
    #comment: String) -> String

The tableName, bundle, and value parameters are marked with a default keyword which means we can omit these parameters while calling the function. In this case, their default values will be used.

This leads to a conclusion that the method call can be simplified to:

NSLocalizedString("key", comment: "comment")
  • 40
    it's only difference that comment can't be nil, and autocompletion is far from intuitive for short version. – Marcin Sep 29 '14 at 7:41
  • 1
    this is not working any more I get error saying that not enough arguments are used. – Apps 4 U Nov 14 '14 at 10:59
  • 4
    The example works for me in Xcode 6.1.1. – BastiBen Nov 28 '14 at 10:19
  • 2
    Not that the above is correct in Xcode 6.3, Swift 1.2 with the specific change from objective-c, the comment (as Marcin stated) cannot be nil, but it can be "" (empty). – Neil Apr 13 '15 at 14:34
  • 1
    A nil/empty comment makes it hard to relocate the string later in the string file; if nothing else add class/file name where it's used as the comment. – Johan Oct 26 '15 at 8:34

By using this way its possible to create a different implementation for different types (i.e. Int or custom classes like CurrencyUnit, ...). Its also possible to scan for this method invoke using the genstrings utility. Simply add the routine flag to the command

genstrings MyCoolApp/Views/SomeView.swift -s localize -o .

extension:

import UIKit

extension String {
    public static func localize(key: String, comment: String) -> String {
        return NSLocalizedString(key, comment: comment)
    }
}

usage:

String.localize("foo.bar", comment: "Foo Bar Comment :)")

A variation of the existing answers:

Swift 4:

extension String {

    func localized(withComment comment: String? = nil) -> String {
        return NSLocalizedString(self, comment: comment ?? "")
    }

}

You can then simply use it with or without comment:

"Goodbye".localized()
"Hello".localized(withComment: "Simple greeting")

Please note though that genstrings wont't work with this solution.

Created a small helper method for cases, where "comment" is always ignored. Less code is easier to read:

public func NSLocalizedString(key: String) -> String {
    return NSLocalizedString(key, comment: "")
}

Just put it anywhere (outside a class) and Xcode will find this global method.

  • 10
    This is bad practice. Comments are recommended and helpful unless you are doing all of the translation yourself. – Jeremiah Jul 1 '16 at 18:27

Swift 3 version :)...

import Foundation

extension String {
    var localized: String {
        return NSLocalizedString(self, tableName: nil, bundle: Bundle.main, value: "", comment: "")
    }
}

Probably the best way is this one here.

fileprivate func NSLocalizedString(_ key: String) -> String {
    return NSLocalizedString(key, comment: "")
}

and

import Foundation
extension String {
    static let Hello = NSLocalizedString("Hello")
    static let ThisApplicationIsCreated = NSLocalizedString("This application is created by the swifting.io team")
    static let OpsNoFeature = NSLocalizedString("Ops! It looks like this feature haven't been implemented yet :(!")
}

you can then use it like this

let message: String = .ThisApplicationIsCreated
print(message)

to me this is the best because

  • The hardcoded strings are in one specific file, so the day you want to change it it's really easy
  • Easier to use than manually typing the strings in your file every time
  • genstrings will still work
  • you can add more extensions, like one per view controller to keep things neat
  • 2
    The thing to note is that Strings defined in the described way are static strings. The app should be relaunched after changing language in iOS Settings app. If not, relaunch it by yourself in order to see changes. It can also have a memory overhead, since we initialize all strings at once, not at the time they’re needed. – iDevAmit May 25 '17 at 6:18
  • 2
    I think it's better to use computed properties here, like this static var Hello: String = { return NSLocalizedString("Hello") } – art-of-dreams Aug 26 '17 at 8:50

Actually, you can use two phases to translate your texts in Swift projects:

1) The first phase is using the old way to create all your translatable strings:

NSLocalisedString("Text to translate", comment: "Comment to comment")

1.1) Then you should use genstrings to generate Localizable.strings:

$ genstrings *swift

2) Afterwards, you should use this answer.

2.1) Use your XCode "Find and Replace" option based on the regular expression. As for the given example (if you have no comments) the regular expression will be:

NSLocalizedString\((.*)\, comment:\ \"\"\) 

and replace it with

$1.localized

or (if you have comments)

NSLocalizedString\((.*)\, comment:\ (.*)\)

and replace it with

$1.localizedWithComment(comment: $2)

You are free to play with regex and different extension combinations as you wish. The general way is splitting the whole process in two phases. Hope that helps.

  • Sorry I don't get the point of many answers here. What's the benefit of the method over using NSLocalizedString("Cancel", comment: "Cancel button title") ? – LShi Feb 7 '17 at 1:19
  • 1
    @LShi some people were complaining, that NSLocalizedString looks less Swiftier, than it should look. String.localized on the other hand looks more Swifty but you are unable to use gesntrings utility with it which is commonly used to ease your work with internationalization. My point is that it`s pretty easy to mix both approaches. So mainly it is a question of readability. – GYFK Feb 7 '17 at 15:17

When you are developing an SDK. You need some extra operation.

1) create Localizable.strings as usual in YourLocalizeDemoSDK.

2) create the same Localizable.strings in YourLocalizeDemo.

3) find your Bundle Path of YourLocalizeDemoSDK.

Swift4:

// if you use NSLocalizeString in NSObject, you can use it like this
let value = NSLocalizedString("key", tableName: nil, bundle: Bundle(for: type(of: self)), value: "", comment: "")

Bundle(for: type(of: self)) helps you to find the bundle in YourLocalizeDemoSDK. If you use Bundle.main instead, you will get a wrong value(in fact it will be the same string with the key).

But if you want to use the String extension mentioned by dr OX. You need to do some more. The origin extension looks like this.

extension String {
    var localized: String {
        return NSLocalizedString(self, tableName: nil, bundle: Bundle.main, value: "", comment: "")
    }
}

As we know, we are developing an SDK, Bundle.main will get the bundle of YourLocalizeDemo's bundle. That's not what we want. We need the bundle in YourLocalizeDemoSDK. This is a trick to find it quickly.

Run the code below in a NSObject instance in YourLocalizeDemoSDK. And you will get the URL of YourLocalizeDemoSDK.

let bundleURLOfSDK = Bundle(for: type(of: self)).bundleURL
let mainBundleURL = Bundle.main.bundleURL

Print both of the two url, you will find that we can build bundleURLofSDK base on mainBundleURL. In this case, it will be:

let bundle = Bundle(url: Bundle.main.bundleURL.appendingPathComponent("Frameworks").appendingPathComponent("YourLocalizeDemoSDK.framework")) ?? Bundle.main

And the String extension will be:

extension String {
    var localized: String {
        let bundle = Bundle(url: Bundle.main.bundleURL.appendingPathComponent("Frameworks").appendingPathComponent("YourLocalizeDemoSDK.framework")) ?? Bundle.main
        return NSLocalizedString(self, tableName: nil, bundle: bundle, value: "", comment: "")
    }
}

Hope it helps.

I've created my own genstrings sort of tool for extracting strings using a custom translation function

extension String {

    func localizedWith(comment:String) -> String {
        return NSLocalizedString(self, tableName: nil, bundle: Bundle.main, value: "", comment: comment)
    }

}

https://gist.github.com/Maxdw/e9e89af731ae6c6b8d85f5fa60ba848c

It will parse all your swift files and exports the strings and comments in your code to a .strings file.

Probably not the easiest way to do it, but it is possible.

  • Max, I like the swift code you wrote for generating strings. It's impressive. Cheers! – abhinavroy23 May 17 at 11:35

Though this doesnt answer to the shortening problem, but this helped me to organize the messages, I created a structure for error messages like below

struct Constants {
    // Error Messages
    struct ErrorMessages {
        static let unKnownError = NSLocalizedString("Unknown Error", comment: "Unknown Error Occured")
        static let downloadError = NSLocalizedString("Error in Download", comment: "Error in Download")
    }
}

let error = Constants.ErrorMessages.unKnownError

This way you can organize the messages and make genstrings work.

And this is the genstrings command used

find ./ -name \*.swift -print0 | xargs -0 genstrings -o .en.lproj

Helpfull for usage in unit tests:

This is a simple version which can be extended to different use cases (e.g. with the use of tableNames).

public func NSLocalizedString(key: String, referenceClass: AnyClass, comment: String = "") -> String 
{
    let bundle = NSBundle(forClass: referenceClass)
    return NSLocalizedString(key, tableName:nil, bundle: bundle, comment: comment)
}

Use it like this:

NSLocalizedString("YOUR-KEY", referenceClass: self)

Or like this with a comment:

NSLocalizedString("YOUR-KEY", referenceClass: self, comment: "usage description")
  • 1
    It is bad practice to leave out the comments. – José Apr 19 at 9:39
  • @José Thanks for your comment. The code was meant as an idea, not as template for copy and paste. But I added the option to add comments if you want ;) – GatoCurioso Apr 20 at 6:38

Localization with default language:

extension String {
func localized() -> String {
       let defaultLanguage = "en"
       let path = Bundle.main.path(forResource: defaultLanguage, ofType: "lproj")
       let bundle = Bundle(path: path!)

       return NSLocalizedString(self, tableName: nil, bundle: bundle!, value: "", comment: "")
    }
}

When you to translate, say from English, where a phrase is the same, to another language where it is different (because of the gender, verb conjugations or declension) the simplest NSString form in Swift that works in all cases is the three arguments one. For example, the English phrase "previous was", is translated differently to Russian for the case of "weight" ("предыдущий был") and for "waist" ("предыдущая была").

In this case you need two different translation for one Source (in terms of XLIFF tool recommended in WWDC 2018). You cannot achieve it with two argument NSLocalizedString, where "previous was" will be the same both for the "key" and the English translation (i.e. for the value). The only way is to use the three argument form

NSLocalizedString("previousWasFeminine", value: "previous was", comment: "previousWasFeminine")

NSLocalizedString("previousWasMasculine", value: "previous was", comment: "previousWasMasculine")

where keys ("previousWasFeminine" and "previousWasMasculine") are different.

I know that the general advice is to translate the phrase as the whole, however, sometimes it too time consuming and inconvenient.

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