6

For x64 I can use this:

 {
   uint64_t hi, lo;
  // hi,lo = 64bit x 64bit multiply of c[0] and b[0]

   __asm__("mulq %3\n\t"
    : "=d" (hi),
  "=a" (lo)
    : "%a" (c[0]),
  "rm" (b[0])
    : "cc" );

   a[0] += hi;
   a[1] += lo;
 }

But I'd like to perform the same calculation portably. For instance to work on x86.

  • What are the types of c[0] and b[0] ? Why not just multiply two uint64_t types? – brian beuning Aug 2 '14 at 13:57
  • 3
    What is the problem? and what is the question? – Nawaz Aug 2 '14 at 14:00
  • mulq is the 64 bit instruction that is the problem and c&b is uint64_t – user3360486 Aug 2 '14 at 14:03
  • 2
    If it is C rather than C++, why did you tag the question C++? Very hard to understand why you would want to use asm to perform trivial multiplication. I also cannot understand your question. I don't know what you are asking. – David Heffernan Aug 2 '14 at 14:28
  • 2
    @DavidHeffernan Kudos on the cleanup! – Potatoswatter Sep 2 '14 at 2:39
13

As I understand the question, you want a portable pure C implementation of 64 bit multiplication, with output to a 128 bit value, stored in two 64 bit values. In which case this article purports to have what you need. That code is written for C++. It doesn't take much to turn it into C code:

void mult64to128(uint64_t op1, uint64_t op2, uint64_t *hi, uint64_t *lo)
{
    uint64_t u1 = (op1 & 0xffffffff);
    uint64_t v1 = (op2 & 0xffffffff);
    uint64_t t = (u1 * v1);
    uint64_t w3 = (t & 0xffffffff);
    uint64_t k = (t >> 32);

    op1 >>= 32;
    t = (op1 * v1) + k;
    k = (t & 0xffffffff);
    uint64_t w1 = (t >> 32);

    op2 >>= 32;
    t = (u1 * op2) + k;
    k = (t >> 32);

    *hi = (op1 * op2) + w1 + k;
    *lo = (t << 32) + w3;
}
  • thanks! while answer is this much complicated why did you give that much negative point – user3360486 Aug 3 '14 at 11:38
  • @user I don't understand that comment. Sorry. – David Heffernan Aug 3 '14 at 14:54
  • @user3360486 David did not downvote your question; that was done by other, anonymous, readers. – Potatoswatter Sep 2 '14 at 2:36
7

Since you have gcc as a tag, note that you can just use gcc's 128-bit integer type:

typedef unsigned __int128 uint128_t;
// ...
uint64_t x, y;
// ...
uint128_t result = (uint128_t)x * y;
uint64_t lo = result;
uint64_t hi = result >> 64;

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