In a 3-row layout:

  • the top row should be sized according to its contents
  • the bottom row should have a fixed height in pixels
  • the middle row should expand to fill the container

The problem is that as the main content expands, it squishes the header and footer rows:

Flexing Bad

HTML:

<section>
  <header>
    header: sized to content
    <br>(but is it really?)
  </header>
  <div>
    main content: fills remaining space<br>
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    <!-- uncomment to see it break - ->
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    <!-- -->
  </div>
  <footer>
    footer: fixed height in px
  </footer>
</section>

CSS:

section {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: column;
  align-items: stretch;
  height: 300px;
}
header {
  flex: 0 1 auto;
  background: tomato;
}
div {
  flex: 1 1 auto;
  background: gold;
  overflow: auto;
}
footer {
  flex: 0 1 60px;
  background: lightgreen;
  /* fixes the footer: min-height: 60px; */
}

Fiddle:

I'm in the lucky situation that I can use the latest and greatest in CSS, disregarding legacy browsers. I thought I could use the flex layout to finally get rid of the old table-based layouts. For some reason, it's not doing what I want...

For the record, there are many related questions on SO about "filling the remaining height", but nothing that solves the problem I'm having with flex. Refs:

  • Seems to be working as expected on the fiddle. – Dayan Aug 2 '14 at 18:19
  • Yes, you need to uncomment the rest of the <div>'s content to see how it breaks. Maybe I should have linked the broken version. Sorry. – Zilk Aug 2 '14 at 18:20
  • I have added both versions to the question now. – Zilk Aug 2 '14 at 18:24
  • I see what you mean now. – Dayan Aug 2 '14 at 18:31
  • dup of stackoverflow.com/questions/90178/…? – Jonathan Stray Jun 10 '17 at 20:07
up vote 173 down vote accepted

Make it simple : DEMO

section {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: column;
  height: 300px;
}
header {
  background: tomato;
/* no flex rules, it will grow */
}
div {
  flex: 1;/* 1 and it will fill whole space left if no flex value are set to other children*/
  background: gold;
  overflow: auto;
}
footer {
  background: lightgreen;
  min-height: 60px; /* min-height has its purpose :) , unless you meant height*/
}
  • 3
    too much flex kills flex ;) ... you are welcome – G-Cyr Aug 2 '14 at 20:00
  • 12
    What if we want section to have a 100% height? – Paul Totzke Jul 13 '15 at 2:20
  • 3
    @PaulTotzke Then it is morelike another question , you just need to set height to 100%. As usual , parents needs an height set/usable, else we have the classic 100% of 'null' example for code above : html,body,section {height:100%;} where section is direct child of body jsfiddle.net/7yLFL/445 this gives a header and footer fixed. – G-Cyr Feb 22 '16 at 16:01
  • 1
    Thanks for the "min-height has its purpose". I was wondering why it didn't work, using height for fixed elements. – Maciej Krawczyk Jun 8 '16 at 15:58
  • 1
    Had an issue with this solution in firefox. I rectified it by changing flex: 1 to flex-grow: 1. Thanks for the solution! – strange_developer Mar 6 at 7:25

The example below includes scrolling behaviour if the content of the expanded centre component extends past its bounds. Also the centre component takes 100% of remaining space in the viewport.

jsfiddle here

html, body, .r_flex_container{
    height: 100%;
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: column;
    background: red;
    margin: 0;
}
.r_flex_container {
    display:flex;
    flex-flow: column nowrap;
    background-color:blue;
}

.r_flex_fixed_child {
    flex:none;
    background-color:black;
    color:white;

}
.r_flex_expand_child {
    flex:auto;
    background-color:yellow;
    overflow-y:scroll;
}

Example of html that can be used to demonstrate this behaviour

<html>
<body>
    <div class="r_flex_container">
      <div class="r_flex_fixed_child">
        <p> This is the fixed 'header' child of the flex container </p>
      </div>
      <div class="r_flex_expand_child">
            <article>this child container expands to use all of the space given to it -  but could be shared with other expanding childs in which case they would get equal space after the fixed container space is allocated. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo. Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Phasellus viverra nulla ut metus varius laoreet. Quisque rutrum. Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Curabitur ullamcorper ultricies nisi. Nam eget dui. Etiam rhoncus. Maecenas tempus, tellus eget condimentum rhoncus, sem quam semper libero, sit amet adipiscing sem neque sed ipsum. Nam quam nunc, blandit vel, luctus pulvinar, hendrerit id, lorem. Maecenas nec odio et ante tincidunt tempus. Donec vitae sapien ut libero venenatis faucibus. Nullam quis ante. Etiam sit amet orci eget eros faucibus tincidunt. Duis leo. Sed fringilla mauris sit amet nibh. Donec sodales sagittis magna. Sed consequat, leo eget bibendum sodales, augue velit cursus nunc,
            </article>
      </div>
      <div class="r_flex_fixed_child">
        this is the fixed footer child of the flex container
        asdfadsf
        <p> another line</p>
      </div>

    </div>
</body>
</html>
  • 2
    This can be slightly simplified by removing html from the selector and appyling height: 100vh to body specifically: jsfiddle.net/pm6nqcqh/1 – Dai Jan 29 at 2:39
  • I did notice a difference between flex:auto and flex:1 on the expandable child. With flex:auto, other children seem to shrink when needed, with flex:1 they don't (in Chrome) – mvermand Apr 20 at 15:39
  • Further condensed: jsfiddle.net/pm6nqcqh/47 – Garfield Jul 7 at 19:46

A more modern approach would be to use the grid property.

section {
  display: grid;
  align-items: stretch;
  height: 300px;
  grid-template-rows: min-content auto 60px;
}
header {
  background: tomato;
}
div {
  background: gold;
  overflow: auto;
}
footer {
  background: lightgreen;
}
<section>
  <header>
    header: sized to content
    <br>(but is it really?)
  </header>
  <div>
    main content: fills remaining space<br>
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>x<br>
    
  </div>
  <footer>
    footer: fixed height in px
  </footer>
</section>

  • 1
    CSS grid support is fairly new. I wouldn't use it unless you don't have to support old browsers. – adi518 Aug 14 '17 at 14:04
  • 4
    Seeing stuff like this makes me laugh. We've circled all the way around to table based design. Everything you learned back in 1995 is relevant again, just with different syntax. – Chris Sobolewski Sep 5 '17 at 20:43

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