13

I have an n-by-m rectangular matrix (n != m). What's the best way to find out if there are any duplicate rows in it in MATLAB? What's the best way to find the indices of the duplicates?

17

Use unique() to find the distinct row values. If you end up with fewer rows, there are duplicates. It'll also give you indexes of one location of each of the distinct values. All the other row indexes are your duplicates.

x = [
    1 1
    2 2
    3 3
    4 4
    2 2
    3 3
    3 3
    ];
[u,I,J] = unique(x, 'rows', 'first')
hasDuplicates = size(u,1) < size(x,1)
ixDupRows = setdiff(1:size(x,1), I)
dupRowValues = x(ixDupRows,:)
  • +1: Dang, beat me by 49 seconds! – gnovice Mar 24 '10 at 18:02
  • Does anyone know the algorithm Matlab uses to compute this? – Will Apr 7 '12 at 1:45
4

You can use the functions UNIQUE and SETDIFF to accomplish this:

>> mat = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9; 7 8 9; 1 2 3];    %# Sample matrix
>> [newmat,index] = unique(mat,'rows','first');  %# Finds indices of unique rows
>> repeatedIndex = setdiff(1:size(mat,1),index)  %# Finds indices of repeats

repeatedIndex =

     4     5
  • Shouldn't repeatedIndex be [3,4]? – AVB Mar 24 '10 at 18:04
  • @AB: No, the fourth and fifth rows of mat are repeats of earlier rows. – gnovice Mar 24 '10 at 18:06
0

Run through the rows of the matrix, and for each pair, test if

row1 == row2

  • 1
    This works, but is definitely both slower and more verbose than the other basic option (i.e. using 'unique()'). – bnaul Mar 24 '10 at 18:02
0

Say your matrix is M:

[S,idx1] = sortrows(M);
idx2 = find(all(diff(S,1) == 0,2));
out = unique(idx1([idx2;idx2+1]));

out will contain the duplicate row indices if any.

  • This will only work if your duplicated rows are next to one another. – gnovice Mar 24 '10 at 18:17
  • My mistake. Wrong assumption... – upperBound Mar 24 '10 at 18:27
  • Well, technically the OP never explicitly said whether or not the duplicated rows abut one another. Although not as general as using UNIQUE, this solution runs substantially faster in the specific case of neighboring duplicates, so +1. – gnovice Mar 24 '10 at 18:37
  • Removed my false assumption... – upperBound Mar 24 '10 at 19:13
  • Well, your new answer is doing something that I don't think the OP wanted. It is returning the indices of all rows that are not unique. I think the OP just wanted indices of duplicates not counting the first one found. In other words, if rows 2, 4, and 5 are the same, then rows 4 and 5 are considered "duplicates", with row 2 being the "original" (or 2 and 4 could be counted as duplicates, with 5 as the original... there was no order specified by the OP). – gnovice Mar 24 '10 at 19:38

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