163

Scenario: the size of various files are stored in a database as bytes. What's the best way to format this size info to kilobytes, megabytes and gigabytes? For instance I have an MP3 that Ubuntu displays as "5.2 MB (5445632 bytes)". How would I display this on a web page as "5.2 MB" AND have files less than one megabyte display as KB and files one gigabyte and above display as GB?

  • 2
    I belive you should create a function doing this. Just divide number by 1024 and look at result. If its more then 1024 then divide again. – Ivan Nevostruev Mar 24 '10 at 18:37
  • 14
    There should be a native function for this. – Sophivorus Feb 9 '13 at 5:03

25 Answers 25

290
function formatBytes($bytes, $precision = 2) { 
    $units = array('B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'); 

    $bytes = max($bytes, 0); 
    $pow = floor(($bytes ? log($bytes) : 0) / log(1024)); 
    $pow = min($pow, count($units) - 1); 

    // Uncomment one of the following alternatives
    // $bytes /= pow(1024, $pow);
    // $bytes /= (1 << (10 * $pow)); 

    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $units[$pow]; 
} 

(Taken from php.net, there are many other examples there, but I like this one best :-)

  • 6
    If you used $bytes /= (1 << (10 * $pow)) or the like, I could like it better. :-P – Chris Jester-Young Mar 24 '10 at 18:46
  • 5
    There you go :D (personally, I don't like bitwise arithmetic, because it is hard to understand if you aren't used to it...) – Leo Mar 24 '10 at 18:50
  • 3
    @Justin that's because 9287695 / 1024 / 1024 is indeed 8,857 :) – Mahn Sep 27 '12 at 20:26
  • 18
    Actually, it's KiB, MiB, GiB and TiB since you are dividing by 1024. If you divided by 1000 it would be without the i. – Devator May 16 '13 at 19:41
  • 1
    $bytes /= (1 << (10 * $pow)) does not work well but number above 1 TB – David Bélanger Aug 5 '13 at 16:40
193

This is Chris Jester-Young's implementation, cleanest I've ever seen, combined with php.net's and a precision argument.

function formatBytes($size, $precision = 2)
{
    $base = log($size, 1024);
    $suffixes = array('', 'K', 'M', 'G', 'T');   

    return round(pow(1024, $base - floor($base)), $precision) .' '. $suffixes[floor($base)];
}

echo formatBytes(24962496);
// 23.81M

echo formatBytes(24962496, 0);
// 24M

echo formatBytes(24962496, 4);
// 23.8061M
  • 8
    it has 2 errors - add 1 to (at least small) files size - not working with 0 (return NAN) – maazza Aug 31 '12 at 10:35
  • Nice one. Is there a version of this the other way around? – Luke Jul 4 '13 at 0:43
  • 3
    a lil dreaming : $suffixes = array('B', 'kB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB', 'PB', 'EB', 'ZB', 'YB'); I wants a Yottabyte hard drive! :-P – SpYk3HH Dec 17 '13 at 16:49
  • i had to cast the $size to a double to get it to work. heres what worked for me: function formatBytes($size, $precision = 2){ $base = log(floatval($size)) / log(1024); $suffixes = array('', 'k', 'M', 'G', 'T'); return round(pow(1024, $base - floor($base)), $precision) . $suffixes[floor($base)]; } – Christopher Gray Mar 19 '14 at 17:02
  • formatBytes(259748192, 3) returns 259748192 MB which is not right – Flip Jun 14 '14 at 23:13
95

Pseudocode:

$base = log($size) / log(1024);
$suffix = array("", "k", "M", "G", "T")[floor($base)];
return pow(1024, $base - floor($base)) . $suffix;
  • Google digital-storage-units convertor uses 1000 and not 1024. what a mess.. – vsync Feb 5 '17 at 14:15
  • Microsoft and Apple use 1024, it depends on your use case. – Parsa Yazdani Jun 23 at 6:01
14

This is Kohana's implementation, you could use it:

public static function bytes($bytes, $force_unit = NULL, $format = NULL, $si = TRUE)
{
    // Format string
    $format = ($format === NULL) ? '%01.2f %s' : (string) $format;

    // IEC prefixes (binary)
    if ($si == FALSE OR strpos($force_unit, 'i') !== FALSE)
    {
        $units = array('B', 'KiB', 'MiB', 'GiB', 'TiB', 'PiB');
        $mod   = 1024;
    }
    // SI prefixes (decimal)
    else
    {
        $units = array('B', 'kB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB', 'PB');
        $mod   = 1000;
    }

    // Determine unit to use
    if (($power = array_search((string) $force_unit, $units)) === FALSE)
    {
        $power = ($bytes > 0) ? floor(log($bytes, $mod)) : 0;
    }

    return sprintf($format, $bytes / pow($mod, $power), $units[$power]);
}
  • Their idea of having an option between 1024 and 1000 power is good. But this implementation is really weird. $force_unit and $si seem to do the same thing. You can also pass any string with an "i" in it to $force_unit, because they test for position. The decimal formatting is also overkill. – Gus Neves Dec 1 '16 at 0:43
13

Just divide it by 1024 for kb, 1024^2 for mb and 1024^3 for GB. As simple as that.

7

use this function if you want a short code

bcdiv()

$size = 11485760;
echo bcdiv($size, 1048576, 0); // return: 10

echo bcdiv($size, 1048576, 2); // return: 10,9

echo bcdiv($size, 1048576, 2); // return: 10,95

echo bcdiv($size, 1048576, 3); // return: 10,953
7

Just my alternative, short and clean:

/**
 * @param int $bytes Number of bytes (eg. 25907)
 * @param int $precision [optional] Number of digits after the decimal point (eg. 1)
 * @return string Value converted with unit (eg. 25.3KB)
 */
function formatBytes($bytes, $precision = 2) {
    $unit = ["B", "KB", "MB", "GB"];
    $exp = floor(log($bytes, 1024)) | 0;
    return round($bytes / (pow(1024, $exp)), $precision).$unit[$exp];
}

or, more stupid and efficent:

function formatBytes($bytes, $precision = 2) {
    if ($bytes > pow(1024,3)) return round($bytes / pow(1024,3), $precision)."GB";
    else if ($bytes > pow(1024,2)) return round($bytes / pow(1024,2), $precision)."MB";
    else if ($bytes > 1024) return round($bytes / 1024, $precision)."KB";
    else return ($bytes)."B";
}
6

I know it's maybe a little late to answer this question but, more data is not going to kill someone. Here's a very fast function :

function format_filesize($B, $D=2){
    $S = 'BkMGTPEZY';
    $F = floor((strlen($B) - 1) / 3);
    return sprintf("%.{$D}f", $B/pow(1024, $F)).' '.@$S[$F].'B';
}

EDIT: I updated my post to include the fix proposed by camomileCase:

function format_filesize($B, $D=2){
    $S = 'kMGTPEZY';
    $F = floor((strlen($B) - 1) / 3);
    return sprintf("%.{$D}f", $B/pow(1024, $F)).' '.@$S[$F-1].'B';
}
  • 1
    You get a double B (BB) for small values of $B, as a work around you could make "$S = 'kMGTPEZY'", and instead of "@$S[$F]" do "@$S[$F-1]". – camomileCase Jun 16 '14 at 16:29
  • @camomileCase Two years and half later - I updated my answer. Thanks. – David Bélanger Dec 14 '16 at 14:05
4

Simple function

function formatBytes($size, $precision = 0){
    $unit = ['Byte','KiB','MiB','GiB','TiB','PiB','EiB','ZiB','YiB'];

    for($i = 0; $size >= 1024 && $i < count($unit)-1; $i++){
        $size /= 1024;
    }

    return round($size, $precision).' '.$unit[$i];
}

echo formatBytes('1876144', 2);
//returns 1.79 MiB
2

My approach

    function file_format_size($bytes, $decimals = 2) {
  $unit_list = array('B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'PB');

  if ($bytes == 0) {
    return $bytes . ' ' . $unit_list[0];
  }

  $unit_count = count($unit_list);
  for ($i = $unit_count - 1; $i >= 0; $i--) {
    $power = $i * 10;
    if (($bytes >> $power) >= 1)
      return round($bytes / (1 << $power), $decimals) . ' ' . $unit_list[$i];
  }
}
1

I succeeded with following function,

    function format_size($size) {
        $mod = 1024;
        $units = explode(' ','B KB MB GB TB PB');
        for ($i = 0; $size > $mod; $i++) {
            $size /= $mod;
        }
        return round($size, 2) . ' ' . $units[$i];
    }
  • 2
    Beware: K is for Kelvin and k is for kilos. – ZeWaren Dec 16 '13 at 17:57
1

try this ;)

function bytesToSize($bytes) {
                $sizes = ['Bytes', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'];
                if ($bytes == 0) return 'n/a';
                $i = intval(floor(log($bytes) / log(1024)));
                if ($i == 0) return $bytes . ' ' . $sizes[$i]; 
                return round(($bytes / pow(1024, $i)),1,PHP_ROUND_HALF_UP). ' ' . $sizes[$i];
            }
echo bytesToSize(10000050300);
1
function changeType($size, $type, $end){
    $arr = ['B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'];
    $tSayi = array_search($type, $arr);
    $eSayi = array_search($end, $arr);
    $pow = $eSayi - $tSayi;
    return $size * pow(1024 * $pow) . ' ' . $end;
}

echo changeType(500, 'B', 'KB');
1

I don't know why you should make it so complicated as the others.

The following code is much simpler to understand and about 25% faster than the other solutions who uses the log function (called the function 20 Mio. times with different parameters)

function formatBytes($bytes, $precision = 2) {
    $units = ['Byte', 'Kilobyte', 'Megabyte', 'Gigabyte', 'Terabyte'];
    $i = 0;

    while($bytes > 1024) {
        $bytes /= 1024;
        $i++;
    }
    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $units[$i];
}
1

This work with the last PHP

function formatBytes($bytes, $precision = 2) { 
    $units = array('B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'); 

    $bytes = max($bytes, 0); 
    $pow = floor(($bytes ? log($bytes) : 0) / log(1024)); 
    $pow = min($pow, count($units) - 1); 

    $bytes /= pow(1024, $pow); 

    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $units[$pow]; 
} 
1

Flexible solution:

function size($size, array $options=null) {

    $o = [
        'binary' => false,
        'decimalPlaces' => 2,
        'decimalSeparator' => '.',
        'thausandsSeparator' => '',
        'maxThreshold' => false, // or thresholds key
        'sufix' => [
            'thresholds' => ['', 'K', 'M', 'G', 'T', 'P', 'E', 'Z', 'Y'],
            'decimal' => ' {threshold}B',
            'binary' => ' {threshold}iB',
            'bytes' => ' B'
        ]
    ];

    if ($options !== null)
        $o = array_replace_recursive($o, $options);

    $base = $o['binary'] ? 1024 : 1000;
    $exp = $size ? floor(log($size) / log($base)) : 0;

    if (($o['maxThreshold'] !== false) &&
        ($o['maxThreshold'] < $exp)
    )
        $exp = $o['maxThreshold'];

    return !$exp
        ? (round($size) . $o['sufix']['bytes'])
        : (
            number_format(
                $size / pow($base, $exp),
                $o['decimalPlaces'],
                $o['decimalSeparator'],
                $o['thausandsSeparator']
            ) .
            str_replace(
                '{threshold}',
                $o['sufix']['thresholds'][$exp],
                $o['sufix'][$o['binary'] ? 'binary' : 'decimal']
            )
        );
}

var_dump(size(disk_free_space('/')));
// string(8) "14.63 GB"
var_dump(size(disk_free_space('/'), ['binary' => true]));
// string(9) "13.63 GiB"
var_dump(size(disk_free_space('/'), ['maxThreshold' => 2]));
// string(11) "14631.90 MB"
var_dump(size(disk_free_space('/'), ['binary' => true, 'maxThreshold' => 2]));
// string(12) "13954.07 MiB"
0
function byte_format($size) {
    $bytes = array( ' KB', ' MB', ' GB', ' TB' );
    foreach ($bytes as $val) {
        if (1024 <= $size) {
            $size = $size / 1024;
            continue;
        }
        break;
    }
    return round( $size, 1 ) . $val;
}
0

Here is simplified implementation of the Drupal format_size function:

/**
 * Generates a string representation for the given byte count.
 *
 * @param $size
 *   A size in bytes.
 *
 * @return
 *   A string representation of the size.
 */
function format_size($size) {
  if ($size < 1024) {
    return $size . ' B';
  }
  else {
    $size = $size / 1024;
    $units = ['KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'];
    foreach ($units as $unit) {
      if (round($size, 2) >= 1024) {
        $size = $size / 1024;
      }
      else {
        break;
      }
    }
    return round($size, 2) . ' ' . $unit;
  }
}
0

It's a little late but a slightly faster version of the accepted answer is below:

function formatBytes($bytes, $precision)
{
    $unit_list = array
    (
        'B',
        'KB',
        'MB',
        'GB',
        'TB',
    );

    $bytes = max($bytes, 0);
    $index = floor(log($bytes, 2) / 10);
    $index = min($index, count($unit_list) - 1);
    $bytes /= pow(1024, $index);

    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $unit_list[$index];
}

It's more efficient, due to performing a single log-2 operation instead of two log-e operations.

It's actually faster to do the more obvious solution below, however:

function formatBytes($bytes, $precision)
{
    $unit_list = array
    (
        'B',
        'KB',
        'MB',
        'GB',
        'TB',
    );

    $index_max = count($unit_list) - 1;
    $bytes = max($bytes, 0);

    for ($index = 0; $bytes >= 1024 && $index < $index_max; $index++)
    {
        $bytes /= 1024;
    }

    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $unit_list[$index];
}

This is because as the index is calculated at the same time as the value of the number of bytes in the appropriate unit. This cut the execution time by about 35% (a 55% speed increase).

0

Another condensed implementation which can translate to the base 1024 (binary) or base 1000 (decimal) and also works with incredibly large numbers hence of the use of the bc library:

function renderSize($byte,$precision=2,$mibi=true)
{
    $base = (string)($mibi?1024:1000);
    $labels = array('K','M','G','T','P','E','Z','Y');
    for($i=8;$i>=1;$i--)
        if(bccomp($byte,bcpow($base, $i))>=0)
            return bcdiv($byte,bcpow($base, $i), $precision).' '.$labels[$i-1].($mibi?'iB':'B');
    return $byte.' Byte';
}
  • Just a little side note; bcpow() will throw TypeError exception if $base and $i are not string values. Tested on PHP version 7.0.11. – David Cery Jan 6 '17 at 18:34
  • Thanks! I added the string caster and fixed an offset bug :) – Christian Jan 6 '17 at 21:53
0

I figured I would add a meshing of two submitters code (Using John Himmelman's code, which is in this thread, and using Eugene Kuzmenko's code) that I'm using.

function swissConverter($value, $format = true, $precision = 2) {
    //Below converts value into bytes depending on input (specify mb, for 
    //example)
    $bytes = preg_replace_callback('/^\s*(\d+)\s*(?:([kmgt]?)b?)?\s*$/i', 
    function ($m) {
        switch (strtolower($m[2])) {
          case 't': $m[1] *= 1024;
          case 'g': $m[1] *= 1024;
          case 'm': $m[1] *= 1024;
          case 'k': $m[1] *= 1024;
        }
        return $m[1];
        }, $value);
    if(is_numeric($bytes)) {
        if($format === true) {
            //Below converts bytes into proper formatting (human readable 
            //basically)
            $base = log($bytes, 1024);
            $suffixes = array('', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB');   

            return round(pow(1024, $base - floor($base)), $precision) .' '. 
                     $suffixes[floor($base)];
        } else {
            return $bytes;
        }
    } else {
        return NULL; //Change to prefered response
    }
}

This uses Eugene's code to format the $value into bytes (I keep my data in MB, so it converts my data: 10485760 MB into 10995116277760) - it then uses John's code to convert it into the proper display value (10995116277760 into 10 TB).

I've found this really helpful - so my thanks to the two submitters!

0

Extremely simple function to get human file size.

Original source: http://php.net/manual/de/function.filesize.php#106569

Copy/paste code:

<?php
function human_filesize($bytes, $decimals = 2) {
  $sz = 'BKMGTP';
  $factor = floor((strlen($bytes) - 1) / 3);
  return sprintf("%.{$decimals}f", $bytes / pow(1024, $factor)) . @$sz[$factor];
}
?>
0

I developed my own function that convert human readable memory size to different sizes.

function convertMemorySize($strval, string $to_unit = 'b')
{
    $strval    = strtolower(str_replace(' ', '', $strval));
    $val       = floatval($strval);
    $to_unit   = strtolower(trim($to_unit))[0];
    $from_unit = str_replace($val, '', $strval);
    $from_unit = empty($from_unit) ? 'b' : trim($from_unit)[0];
    $units     = 'kmgtph';  // (k)ilobyte, (m)egabyte, (g)igabyte and so on...


    // Convert to bytes
    if ($from_unit !== 'b')
        $val *= 1024 ** (strpos($units, $from_unit) + 1);


    // Convert to unit
    if ($to_unit !== 'b')
        $val /= 1024 ** (strpos($units, $to_unit) + 1);


    return $val;
}


convertMemorySize('1024Kb', 'Mb');  // 1
convertMemorySize('1024', 'k')      // 1
convertMemorySize('5.2Mb', 'b')     // 5452595.2
convertMemorySize('10 kilobytes', 'bytes') // 10240
convertMemorySize(2048, 'k')        // By default convert from bytes, result is 2

This function accepts any memory size abbreviation like "Megabyte, MB, Mb, mb, m, kilobyte, K, KB, b, Terabyte, T...." so it is typo safe.

0
function convertToReadableSize($size)
{
  $base = log($size) / log(1024);
  $suffix = array("B", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB");
  $f_base = floor($base);
  return round(pow(1024, $base - floor($base)), 1) . $suffix[$f_base];
}

Just call the function

echo convertToReadableSize(1024); // Outputs '1KB'
echo convertToReadableSize(1024 * 1024); // Outputs '1MB'
0

Base on Leo's answer, add

  • Support for negative
  • Support 0 < value < 1 ( Ex: 0.2, will cause log(value) = negative number )

If you want max unit to Mega, change to $units = explode(' ', ' K M');


function formatUnit($value, $precision = 2) {
    $units = explode(' ', ' K M G T P E Z Y');

    if ($value < 0) {
        return '-' . formatUnit(abs($value));
    }

    if ($value < 1) {
        return $value . $units[0];
    }

    $power = min(
        floor(log($value, 1024)),
        count($units) - 1
    );

    return round($value / pow(1024, $power), $precision) . $units[$power];
}

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