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kinda new with sed. I made a script to replace various text in a file. As an example, file test.txt contains:

My name is <Jack>.
My dad calls me <Jack>. My mum calls me <Jack>, too.

I want to replace "<" and ">" with ":". I used this command

sed -re 's/<(.+?)>/:\1:/g' test.txt

It returns

My name is :Jack:.
My dad calls me :Jack>. My mum calls me <Jack:, too.

So, it works well with a single occurence in a line. The result is wrong with multiple occurrences in a line, because sed argument is all the text between the first "<" and the last ">".

Any hints? (And a little explaination, too...)

Thanks!

EDIT:

The same regular expression works correctly using replace in Gedit or other editors.

3

easiest:

kent$  echo "My name is <Jack>.
dquote> My dad calls me <Jack>. My mum calls me <Jack>, too."|sed 's/[<>]/:/g'
My name is :Jack:.
My dad calls me :Jack:. My mum calls me :Jack:, too.

if you want to use group:

kent$  echo "My name is <Jack>.
My dad calls me <Jack>. My mum calls me <Jack>, too."|sed -r 's/<([^>]*)>/:\1:/g'
My name is :Jack:.
My dad calls me :Jack:. My mum calls me :Jack:, too.

In your codes, you want to use non-greedy matching, unfortunately, sed doesn't support that. So the reason why you got your output is:

the whole

<Jack>. My mum calls me <Jack>

is like <....>

the .+ matches Jack>. My mum calls me <Jack

  • 1
    Alternatively, s/<[^>]+>/:\1:/g. – ooga Aug 4 '14 at 20:58
  • Thanks for the "sed doesn't support non-greedy matching" info. That explains why I can use the same regular expression in Gedit and it works (edited my question). I will analyze your code and test it. Can't use it straightforward since the actual replacement is a little more complicated than just replace "<>"; this was a brief example. Well, since I'm here asking... What if "Jack" is sorrounded, say, by an html tag (e.g. <a href="#anchor">Jack</a>) – il_mix Aug 5 '14 at 5:47
0

I update the example.

Here is test.html:

My name is <a href="filename.html#firstAnchor">Jack</a>.
My dad calls me <a href="filename.html#firstAnchor">Jack</a>. My mum calls me <a href="filename.html#secondAnchor">Jack</a>, too.

This command give me the expected result:

sed -re 's/<a href="filename.html#[^>]*>([^<]*)<\/a>/:\1:/g' test.html

Result:

My name is :Jack:.
My dad calls me :Jack:. My mum calls me :Jack:, too.

sed search for the tag that starts with <a href="filename.html# and all following characters but not ">" (option [^>]), than search till ">". The argument is any char but "<" (option [^<]), than the delimiter is "</a>".

Did I get it?

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