9

This question seems to be asked a lot. I had some legacy production code that was seemingly fine, until it started getting many more connections per day. Each connection kicked off a new thread. Eventually, it would exhaust memory and crash.

I'm going back over pthread (and C sockets) which I've not dealt with in years. The tutorial I had was informative, but I'm seeing the same thing when I use top. All the threads exit, but there's still some virtual memory taken up. Valgrind tells me there is a possible memory loss when calling pthread_create(). The very basic sample code is below.

The scariest part is that pthread_exit( NULL ) seems to leave about 100m in VIRT unaccounted for when all the threads exit. If I comment out this line, it's much more liveable, but there is still some there. On my system it start with about 14k, and ends with 47k.

If I up the thread count to 10,000, VIRT goes up to 70+ gigs, but finishes somewhere around 50k, assuming I comment out pthread_exit( NULL ). If I use pthread_exit( NULL ) it finishes with about 113m still in VIRT. Are these acceptable? Is top not telling me everything?

void* run_thread( void* id )
{
    int thread_id = *(int*)id;
    int count = 0;
    while ( count < 10 ) {
        sleep( 1 );
        printf( "Thread %d at count %d\n", thread_id, count++ );
    }

    pthread_exit( NULL );
    return 0;
}

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    sleep( 5 ); 
    int thread_count    = 0;
    while( thread_count < 10 ) {
        pthread_t my_thread;
        if ( pthread_create( &my_thread, NULL, run_thread, (void*)&thread_count ) < 0 )   {
            perror( "Error making thread...\n" );
            return 1;
        }

        pthread_detach( my_thread );
        thread_count++;
        sleep( 1 );
    }

    pthread_exit( 0 );  // added as per request
    return 0;
}
4
  • I assume you are reporting the valgrind results for your numbers. Can you add pthread_exit(0) before you return 0 in main()?
    – jxh
    Aug 5, 2014 at 2:48
  • Adding that seems to help... with valgrind anyway. 'top' still seems to say there is some virtual memory still in use. The program has 14k of VIRT before kicking off threads, and now 110m after. This seems to be static though. The 100m in VIRT is there whether the thread count is 10 or 1000. I guess I should trust valgrind? Aug 5, 2014 at 3:18
  • 3
    Yes. The reason for the memory problem reported by valgrind was that not all the threads had finished before the main thread ended. Adding the thread_exit() call fixed that.
    – jxh
    Aug 5, 2014 at 3:24
  • 1
    Not related to the memory leaks, but you're passing in the address of the same local thread_count variable to each new thread. Depending on how quickly the thread starts up, it might see the correct value, or it might see a newer, higher value. You need to either allocate on the heap a new variable to pass to each child thread, or use an integer cast to (void*). Aug 5, 2014 at 4:39

2 Answers 2

8

I know this is rather old question, but I hope others wil benefit. This is indeed a memory leak. The thread is created with default attributes. By default the thread is joinable. A joinable threads keeps its underlying bookkeeping until it is finished... and joined. If a thread is never joined, set de Detached attribute. All (thread) resources will be freed once the thread terminates. Here's an example:

pthread_attr_t attr;
pthread_t thread;
pthread_attr_init(&attr);
pthread_attr_setdetachstate(&attr, 1);
pthread_create(&thread, &attr, &threadfunction, NULL);
pthread_attr_destroy(&attr);
1
  • 2
    Very nice -- and thanks for answering an old question for posterity. Of course, I only used std::thread now, which seems to encapsulate all this much better. :) Nov 16, 2017 at 16:04
7

Prior to your edit of adding pthread_exit(0) to the end of main(), your program would finish executing before all the threads had finished running. valgrind thus reported the resources that were still being held by the threads that were still active at the time the program terminated, making it look like your program had a memory leak.

The call to pthread_exit(0) in main() makes the main thread wait for all the other spawned threads to exit before it itself exits. This lets valgrind observe a clean run in terms of memory utilization.

(I am assuming linux is your operating system below, but it seems you are running some variety of UNIX from your comments.)

The extra virtual memory you see is just linux assigning some pages to your program since it was a big memory user. As long as your resident memory utilization is low and constant when you reach the idle state, and the virtual utilization is relatively constant, you can assume your system is well behaved.

By default, each thread gets 2MB of stack space on linux. If each thread stack does not need that much space, you can adjust it by initializing a pthread_attr_t and setting it with a smaller stack size using pthread_attr_setstacksize(). What stack size is appropriate depends on how deep your function call stack grows and how much space the local variables for those functions take.

#define SMALLEST_STACKSZ PTHREAD_STACK_MIN
#define SMALL_STACK (24*1024)
pthread_attr_t attr;
pthread_attr_init(&attr);
pthread_attr_setstacksize(&attr, SMALL_STACK);
/* ... */
pthread_create(&my_thread, &attr, run_thread, (void *)thread_count);
/* ... */
pthread_attr_destroy(&attr);
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  • Thanks so much -- that makes a lot of sense! Aug 5, 2014 at 5:44

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